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The 



Manors of Suffolk 



Notes 



on 



Their History and Devolution 

The Hundreds of Thingoe, Thredling, 
Wangford, and Wilford 

Including a General Index to the Holders of the Manors 
With some Illustrations of the Old Manor Houses 



BY 



W. A. COPINGER, M.A., LL.D., F.S.A., F.R.S.A. 

Of the Middle Temple, Barrister-at-law, Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Law in the 

Victoria University of Manchester, Sometime President of the Bibliographical Society, Author of 

"County of Suffolk : Its History as Disclosed by Existing Records," &c. 



VOL. 7. /s"i_ i 



Privately Printed 
and obtainable only by Subscriber 

from 

TAYLOR, GARNETT. EVANS, 6t CO.. LTD. 
MANCHESTER 
1911 



TAYLOR. CARNETT. EVANS 

AND COMPANY. LIMITED. 

54. FLEET STREET. LONDON. 

Abo Maochctter and Rrdd.sh. 




PREFACE. 

IHE Author, on completing the task he undertook of writing 
the History of the Manors of Suffolk, desires to thank his 
subscribers for the support they have extended to him. 
The whole of the seven volumes were written before the 
first was sent to Press, or the author would not have ven- 
tured to promise what he had not already performed ! 

To this volume is added what might be termed a " Working 
Index." In order to obviate dealing with the various families many 
times over, it became necessary to make such an Index while the work 
was yet in manuscript, and it has occurred to the writer that the Index 
might have some value now the work is in type. He would, however, 
point out that it is quite possible that as the work passed through 
the Press, additions or alterations have been made which are not noted in 
the Index. He is not aware of any, but thinks it but right to state that he 
could not undertake the task of verifying this Index from the printed copies 
of the seven volumes. Some of the subscribers have suggested that a 
portrait of the author should be given in this last volume, and the author 
has had the weakness to fall in with the suggestion, which was no doubt a 
conservative survival of the old county history feature. It only remains 
to point out what may not be known to all the subscribers that the 
result that the six volumes of the " Records " and the seven volumes of the 
" Manors " which would leave the author's contribution to the County 
of Suffolk at the unfortunate number of thirteen, is nullified by the fact 
that his " History of the Parish of Buxhall " makes a fourteenth volume, 
which he has had the pleasure and the privilege of contributing to his 
much-loved County of Suffolk. 

W. A. COPINGER. 



[N.B. The above Preface was written by the late author shortly before his decease, 
which occurred in March last. It has been thought better to leave it as he had written it 
rather than to make any alteration. H. B. C.] 



THINGOE AND THREDLING HUNDREDS. 



TH I NOjOW , 
vA HV. * 




SAXTON. 
1576. 



TREDLINGE | 

^^.;; 

HV._ 




BOWEN, 
1777. 



THE 



MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



THINGOE HUNDRED. 




HINGOE is variously spelled in Domesday Survey Tinchon, 
Tingolio, Thingehow, Thingohon, and Thinhoge, and it 
derives its name from the spot within its limits where the 
placita for the whole jurisdiction of the Liberty of St. 
Edmunds were held ; Thinghow signifying the hill of the 
council or assembly. The Hundred is of an irregular oval 
figure about nine miles in its greatest breadth and n in 
length, including the borough of Bury St. Edmunds, which lies within 
its limits, but is a separate jurisdiction. It is in the Franchise of St. 
Edmund, in the Deanery of Thingoe, Archdeaconry of Sudbury, and 
Diocese of Ely. It is bounded on the north by the Hundreds of Lackford 
and Blackbourn ; on the east by Thedwestry with the river Lark, on the 
south by Babergh and Risbridge, and on the west by Risbridge and 
Lackford. 

The soil of those parishes bordering on the Hundreds of Lackford, 
Blackbourn, Thedwestry, and the northern extremity of Risbridge is often 
light with heaths more or less extensive, and the country is open, excepting 
where the Lark runs in its course northward. A deeper soil, woody 
enclosures, and a more diversified surface are to be found towards Babergh 
and Risbridge Hundreds on the south. 

The fee of this Hundred was till the dissolution of the monasteries in 
the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and was farmed by the bailiffs of the abbey ; 
but it has since been in the Crown. In 1575 Sir Thomas Kytson, Knt., 
and in 1595, Sir Nicholas Bacon, 1 held in lease from the Crown this Hundred. 
In 1629 it was granted to Henry, Earl of Holland, 2 and others for 99 years 
in trust for the Queen Consort, and in 1672 was vested in Henry, Earl of 
St. Albans, and others in trust for Queen Katharine. It continues to 
belong to the Crown. 

The Hundred contains 31, 114 acres, in 19 parishes and 39 manors, as 
follows : 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 




I Barrow. 


Chevington . . 


Chevington. 


Barrow .... 


Felton. 
Wolf Hall or 


Flempton . . 


j Flempton or Ged- 
( dings. 




Mundeford's. 


Fornham All 


{ Fornham All Saints. 




[ Brockley Hall. 


Saints . . 


( Aldred's. 


Brockley 


Talmages and Wy- 
folds. 


Hardwick . . 


Hardwick. 




( Ingham's. 


Hargrave . . 


Hargrave. 



1 Pat. Rolls, 37 Eliz. pt. 5. 



"Pat. Rolls, 5 Car. I. 15 n. 6. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Manors 



Haw-stead 



Hengrave 

Hornings- 
heath 

Ickworth. 
Lac k ford . . 
Nowton 



Rede 



Risby 



Saxham 
(Great) 



Haw-stead. 

Bokenham al. Tal- 
mashe. 

Fylets. 

Henerave. 

Gt. Horningsherth. 

Little Hornings- 
herth. 

Ickworth. 

Lackford. 

Nowton. 

Rede. 

Rede Hall. 

Picard's al. Pic- 
kard's al. Cres- 
sener's. 

Risby al. Risby Sex- 
tons al. Westley. 

Charmans. 

Cold Hall. 
l Saxham -Magna. 
I Wodethorpe Hall. 



Saxham 
(Little) 



NVestley .. 



Whepstead 



Saxham Hall Parva 
al. Grace's. 

Geddyng's or Topes- 
fields. 

Large's. 

Westley al. Sextens 
or Sextens in 
Westley. 

Loe's Hall or Luce's 
Hall. 

Westley al. Pem- 
broke al. Dunham 
Hall. 
Fresel's Manor. 

Whepstead Hall. 

Doveton Hall or 
Dorrington Hall,or 
Duffin Hall. 

Cage's or Over Cage 
Hall. 

Manston Hall. 




BARROW MANOR. 



BARROW MANOR. 

ARROW Manor belonged to Edward the Confessor. It 
was held with 7 carucates of land, and there were 6 villeins, 
4 bordars, 2 slaves, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 5 plough- 
teams belonging to the men, wood for 8 hogs, 3 acres of 
meadow, and i mill. There was also a church with 17 
acres of free land, also 15 hogs. Also a socman with 30 
acres, having a ploughteam. The whole was valued at 

10, but by the time of the Domesday Survey the value had risen to 

20 by weight. 

There had been a general increase in prosperity all round in this 
extensive manor, the villeins had increased to 15, the bordars to 10, while 
i slave had been enfranchised or disappeared. 

There was an extra ploughteam in demesne and 9 more belonging to 
the men. The hogs were 40, and there were 100 sheep and 60 goats. The 
manor was a league in length and 8 quarentenes in breadth, and paid in 
a gelt jd. 1 

The manor was among the demesne lands of the Crown at the time 
of the Domesday Survey, and was part of the fee of Richard, son of Gilbert, 
Earl of Clare, on the marriage of whose daughter and heir Isabella with 
William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke, Rich. I. gave all the lands which had 
belonged to her father. Thomas de Barewe, son of Bertram, held the 
manor of Earl William. Bertram was son of Thieri, mentioned in the Pipe 
Rolls of 1130 as son of Derman, of London, who held half a hide hi Islington, 
1086. Thomas de Barwe or Barrow, Lord of Barrow, and of Newington 
' Barrow," in Islington, was living in the time of King John. He had 
two daughters and coheirs Maud, married to Hamon Passelewe, and Alice, 
married to William de St. Albans. This manor, with the advowson, was 
taken by Hamon Passelewe, while the Islington property was taken by the 
other coheir Alice. 

There is a notice of an action this year by Hamon Passelewe and 
Matilda his wife against William de St. Albans and Alice his wife, claiming 
the right to present to Barrow church, and an order was made to attach 
the defendants for non-appearance notwithstanding the Liberty of Bury. 2 

The next year Haman Passelewe had a grant of free warren for the 
manor. 3 He was Sheriff of Suffolk during several years of this reign, an 
office which his ancestor, Ralph de Passelewe, had held in the time of 
Hen. I. Hen. III. granted by charter nth Feb. 1267, to Maud Passelewe 
and her heirs a market every week on Saturdays at her Manor of Barewe, 
and a fair every year for three days to commence the day before the Feast 
of St. John the Baptist, unless it were to the injury of the neighbouring 
markets and fairs ; but from the contiguity of this parish to Bury it is 
doubtful whether this privilege was ever exercised. 4 

Maud shortly after this settled the estate upon her daughter and sole 
heir Katherine, wife of Sir William Giffard, of Weston, co. Gloucester, 
brother of Walter, Archbishop of York, which William was Sheriff of 

'Dom. ii. 2896. 3 Chart. Rolls, 26 Hen. III. 6. 

'Abbr. of Pleas, 25 Hen. III. 24 in dorso. 4 Chart. Rolls, 51 Hen. III. 8. 



4 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Suffolk in 1272 and 1275, and he and his wife Katherine obtained from 
the Crown in 1291 a confirmation of the right of free warren in the manor.' 

John Giffard, of Weston, and Hugh Giffard, parson of this parish 
church, sons of William and Katherine, in 1319 released to Bartholomew, 
Lord Badlesmere, all claim to the manor and advowson, 1 and the same year 
Hugh released Matilda de Clare, Countess of Gloucester, from all actions 
against her by reason of expenses of defending the manor. 5 

Lord Badlesmere (then Sir Bartholomew de Badlesmere) granted Hugh 
Giffard an annuity of 10 and two robes out of the profits of the manor, 
until Hugh should be provided with a yearly benefice or place of profit 
of 100.* 

Katherine, the heiress of the Passelewes, and widow of Sir Will. Giffard, 
was still living when her sons released their interests in the manor and 
advowson, and in 1321 she again executed a release of her right in the 
same to Sir Bartholomew de Badlesmere.* 

Lord Badlesmere's wife Margaret was daughter and coheir of Thomas, 
3rd son of Thomas, 2nd son of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester. Lord 
Badlesmere being in the insurrection of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster, he was 
taken prisoner and afterwards executed in 1321. The manor was, of course, 
forfeited, and the King in 1322 gave the estate to Hugh le Despencer, the 
younger. 6 The same year, however, the King committed to John de 
Bereton the custody of the manor which belonged to Hugh le Despencer 
the younger during pleasure, 7 and there is an order to extend the manor 
on the Close Rolls of 1326, no doubt on the death of the Royal favourite 
this year, when on impeachment before Parliament he received sentence 
" to be drawn upon a hurdle with trumps and trumpets throughout all the 
city of Hereford and there to be hanged and quartered," which sentence 
was executed on a gallows 50 feet high upon St. Andrew's Eve, 1326.* 

On the accession of Edw. III. the attainder of Lord Badlesmere was 
reversed, and the manor restored to Margaret his widow, 9 and at her death 
in 1332 passed to Giles de Badlesmere, her only son, a minor in custody of 
the King, who by special favour had livery on doing homage of such lands 
as were the inheritance of his mother. In 1335 he was summoned to 
Parliament and married Elizabeth, daughter of William de Montacute, 
Earl of Salisbury, but died without issue in 1338, when the manor passed 
to Elizabeth his widow for life. She survived till 1339." 

There is a mandate to the escheator on the Close Rolls of 1341 to assign 
to William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton, and to Elizabeth his wife, 
sister and coheir of Giles de Badlesmere, the third part of a fee which Edward 
de Cretyng held extended at 13. 6s. 8d. yearly in Barrow and Fornham 
after the death of Elizabeth, late wife of Giles." 

On the death of Elizabeth, the widow of Giles, Lord Badlesmere, in 
I 359 the property was divided between her ist husband's four sisters, 
this manor falling to Margaret, wife of John Tibetot, or rather to her son, 
John de Tibetot. He was the son of Pain de Tibetot, who had been 

'Chart. Rolls, 19 Edw. I. 61. 'Close Rolls, 20 Edw. II. 4, Extent. Thos. 

'Close Rolls, 12 Edw. II. 8d. id. Roscelyn for Tho. de Kardeston 

'Close Rolls, 12 Edw. II. jd. late Archdeacon of Norf. ; I.Q.D. 20 

4 Ib. Edw. II. 33- 

'Close Rolls, 14 Edw. II. ijd. 'Close Rolls, i Edw. Ill, pt. i. 4. 

Chart. Rolls, 15 Edw. II. 9 and 10. '"I.P.M., 12 Edw. III. (2nd nos.) 548(1. 

7 Originalia, 15 Edw. II. 9. "Close Rolls, 15 Edw. III. pt. ii. 45. 



BARROW MANOR. 5 

summoned to Parliament as a baron upon the accession of Edw II bv 
Agnes his wife, daughter of William de Roos, of Hamlake. Sir John 'was 
in the wars of France and Scotland, and was constituted Governor of 
Berwick-upon-Tweed in 1346. He was summoned to Parliament from 1335 
to 1366, and died in 1367,' and the manor will not be found mentioned in 
his mquis. p.m., which shows that his wife, in whose right alone he could 
have held, had died in the lifetime of her brother's widow, who had taken as 
a 2nd husband Hugh, Lord le Despenser, and as a 3rd Guy de Bryan. The 
manor on her death evidently went to his sister's heir John, who also died 
in I 359, an d we find accordingly the manor mentioned in his inquis. p.m. 2 
even in the lifetime of his father. This explains the entry on the Originalia 
Rolls, otherwise unaccountable, of the King having committed to William 
Deyncourt the custody of the manor during the minority of the heir. 3 

On John Tibetot's (the son) death the manor passed to his brother, 
Sir Robert de Tibetot, 3rd Baron, on the death of his father in 1367. He 
was born on the Feast of St. Barnabas the Apostle, 15 Edw. III., and conse- 
quently was 26 years of age at the death of his father. He was summoned 
to Parliament from 24th Feb. 1368, to 8th Jan. 1371, and died I3th April, 
1372, seised of the lordship, 4 leaving his widow Margaret, 5 daughter of 
William, Lord Deincourt, entitled to dower, and three daughters and coheirs - 
Margaret, married to Roger, 2nd Lord Scrope, of Bolton ; Milicent, married 
to Stephen le Scrope, brother of the above Roger ; and Elizabeth, married 
to Philip le Despenser the younger ; and the King committed to Richard 
le Scrope the custody of the manor and advowson during the minority of 
the heir, with what advantage is obvious, as he married two of these coheirs 
to two of his own sons. 6 

In 1385 partition was made of the estates amongst the three daughters 
of Sir Robert de Tibetot, this manor being allotted to Sir Philip le Despencer 
the younger aad Elizabeth his wife, youngest daughter of Sir Robert Tibetot, 
Sir Philip le Despencer surviving his wife became tenant by the curtesy. 
He died in I434/ when the manor devolved upon Margery his only child, 
wife of Sir Roger Went worth, of Nettlestead, and from this time to the time 
of Thomas, 2nd Lord Wentworth, the manor devolved in the same course 
as the Manor of Nettlestead, in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 

Thomas, 2nd Lord Wentworth, had a fine levied against him of the 
manor and advowson by Sir William Waldegrave and others in 1539, and 
in 1540 sold 8 the manor and advowson to Sir Clement Heigham, Knt., 
to whom he was distantly connected by marriage. Sir Clement was a 
member of the family of Heigham, taking their name from Heigham, a hamlet 
of the adjoining parish of Gazeley, where they held lands of the Honor of 
Clare. Sir Clement was the son and heir of Clement Heigham, of Lavenham, 
and Matilda, daughter of Lawrence Cooke, of Lavenham, which Clement 
was the 4th son of Thomas Heigham, of Heigham, by Catherine, daughter 
of William Cotton, of Lanwade. 9 He was twice reader of the Society of 
Lincoln's Inn, and rose to be the Chief Baron of the Exchequer. 

'I.P.M., 41 Edw. III. 39. 7 I.P.M., 2 Hen. VI. 31. 

1 1. P.M., 33 Edw. III. 39. "Davy makes Thomas, 2nd Lord Went- 
3O. 34 Edw. III. 3. worth, to be succeeded in the lord- 

Extent, I.P.M., 46 Edw. III. 62, 64. ship by his son and heir Henry, but 

5 So called by Hunter, in his Deanery of this is a mistake. 

Doncaster (1325), and Burke, but 9 For earlier pedigree see Gifford Hall 
Maud by Banks (Baron. Angl. Manor, Wickhambrooke, Risbridge 

Con.) 433. Hundred. 

6 O. 47 Edw. III. 5- 



6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In his early days, for his services to the monastery of Bury, he was 
rewarded in 1528 by being made chief bailiff of the Liberty of St. Edmunds 
(after the death of Sir Robert Drury") with a yearly rent of j issuing out 
of the Manor of Old Hall, together with other profits belonging thereto, and 
had granted to him various leases of different parts of the monastic property. 
The monastery after granted to Sir Clement and Thomas Mounninge the 
office of Keeper of the Park of Chevington, with a ground rent of 455. 6d. 

Upon the accession of Queen Mary Sir Clement joined the Royal 
Standard, and was later chosen Speaker of the House of Commons. The 
Parliament in which Sir Clement presided was a somewhat memorable 
one, for it repealed all the laws of Hen. VIII. and Edw. VI. relating to the 
reformed religion, and reunion with the Church of Rome was effected. The 
day before the dissolution a solemn procession of both houses passed through 
London to give thanks to God for their conversion to the Catholic Church. 
In this procession there were borne 90 crosses, and no less than 116 priests 
in their copes and vestments, with eight bishops in pontificalibus, took part. 
Bonner, Bishop of London, carried the pix under a splendid canopy, attended 
by the House of Lords and the House of Commons, headed by their Speaker, 
and followed by the Lord Mayor, aldermen, and city companies in their 
several liveries. 1 

Sir Clement was knighted by King Philip in his chamber at Westminster 
on Sunday, 27th Jan. 1554-5. He represented Rye, Ipswich, Westloa, and 
Lancaster successively in the House, but retired from public life on the 
accession of Queen Elizabeth, and settled in his manor house at Barrow, 
which he had himself erected. He married ist Anne, daughter of John de 
Moonies, of Semer Hall, by Margaret, daughter of Henry Woodwoorde, 
and 2ndly Anne, daughter of George Waldegrave, of Smallbridge, by Anne, 
daughter of Sir Robert Drury, of Hawstead, sister of Philis, wife of Thomas 
Heigham, of Heigham, and widow of Henry Buers, of Acton, and he left 
issue by both marriages. Sir Clement Heigham died gth March, 1570-1, 
and was buried at Barrow, where on the pavement of the church against 
the south wall of the chancel stands his tomb. It consists of a low canopy 
of Petworth marble, with a flat arched roof enriched with quatrefoils and 
Tudor flowers. The effigies of the knight, his two wives, and their children 
are represented upon brasses at the back of the tomb. He Is represented 
in armour, except the head, which is bare, kneeling before a desk, 
on which is an open book. His helmet rests against the desk, and his 
gauntlets hang in front of it ; the other figures are all kneeling. Above 
his head hangs his shield, bearing the arms of Heigham, quarterly, ist 
and 4th Heigham ; 2nd and 3rd Francys. Crest : a horse's head erased, 
Argent. 

To the right of this shield is another, with his arms quarterly as before 
impaled with those of Anne, his 2nd wife, viz. : quarterly, ist Waldegrave, 
quarterly : - 

1. Waldegrave, per fesse Argent and Gules. 

2. Montchency, barruly of 12. Argent and Azure. 

3. Creke, Or, a fess waire Sable and Gules. 

4. Vauney, Gules, an eagle displayed Ermine. 

5. Moyne, Argent, 2 bars in chief, 3 mullets Sable. 

6. Waldegrave. 

'Howard, Vist. of Stiff, ii. 297. 



BARROW MANOR. 7 

2nd and 3rd Fray ; Ermine, a fess Sable, between three fig-frays Or 
4th Waldegrave, quarterly as ist. 

To the left, a shield with the arms of Waldegrave, and quarterings as 
before, quarterry, with Fray. 

Beneath the effigies the following inscription, in old English characters : 

I. 

Berefte of worldly lyfe, in hope to ryse to endlesse light, 

By Christ's deserts, here rests the corse of Clement Heighm, Knight, 

Whom Suffolk soyle did brede, bring up, and chiefly foster, ay, 

In Barrowe, where his dwelling was until his dying day, 

Which was the nynth of March, since God a mortal man became, 

The thousanth and five hundreth yeare, with seventy to the same. 

What tyme our soverane Lady deere, Elizabeth, our Queene, 

Of her most milde and gracius reigne, did recken yeares thirteen 

He was a man whom God had given great pregnacie of wit, 

And therewith all such utterance as for the same was fytte ; 

The feare of God he alwais had just fixt in holy hearte, 

And from his prynce in loyalty no iote would he departe ; 

A faithful frind to all goode men, in worde and eke in deede, 

And lyke a parent to the pore w th almose at their nede ; 

His study and profession were the laws of this our lande, 

The ground whereof he deemed was ryght well to understand, 

And for his proof of learned skyll, by study got theryn ; 

In house of Courte called Lyncoln's Inn, twice reader he hade been ; 

By thys his knowledge in those lawes he did still peace preserve, 

When quarells caus'd his neyghbors ofte from unitye to swerve, 

His country may full well bewaile the losse of such a guyde, 

Who ready was as ryghtfull judge their stryfe for to decyde. 

II. 

He duely did correct all vice and favoured virtue mylde, 

And in his judgment would not be with bryberye defy led, 

In punishment with the pore, which did their cryme lament, 

He would with pyty mercifull from rigour soon relent, 

But unto them which wilfully contynuede in offence, 

A terror unto them he was in justice true defence, 

Through which good gift so manifest such favor he obtained 

With Philippe and with Marye late our soveraynes when they reigned, 

That he by sage and good advyce was chosen for to bee, 

The speaker of the Parliamente, and furthered to degree. 

To be of Privy Counsayle with his Prynce, and afterward 

To Lord Chief Baron of the Queene's eschecker was preferd, 

The wh ch advancement ended by Queene Maries death, and he 

Returning into private state, contynued in degree, 

Of worshippe in his country, still a justicer of peace ; 

And from his virtues here rehirst till death he did not cease, 

Wh ch then from care dischardging him and of ech worldlye thynge, 

Was unto him a direct meane his lastinge life to bringe, 

Then (as he usde alwais much time in prayer for to spende) 

Then soe with prayer at the last his earthly life did end. 

God grant that this (a true record) of him here left behind, 

May cause ech man remember one and bear his life in mind. 



8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Sir Clement's will is dated loth Nov. 1570,' and in it he refers to this 
manor as follows : " Item ; whereas the xviii" daye of December, in 
the xxxj yere of the Raigne of our Late Soveraigne-Lorde King' Henry 
the eighth, S r Will'm WaTgrave, S r Will'm Drewery, S r Thomas Jermin, 
Knight, and others by theire dede indented baring date the daye and yere 
abovesaide, did demise, infeofe, and by their sayde deede confirm unto me 
Clement Heigh'm, and Anne, nowe my Wief, the Mann r of Barrowe, with 
the app"tenn** w* the advowson of the Churche, w h the libertie of the folde w h 
all and singular the apptatenances, and all other theire meases, landes, tene- 
ments, medowes, pastures, woodes, rents, and syrvices, with all and singular 
app'ten'nce in the saide Towne of Barrowghe, and other townes adioyninge 
To have and to holde the saide manner and thatdvowson, with all and 
singuler thapp'tenance, and all other their meases, landes, and ten'te in 
the saide Deede contayned and specified unto me the saide Clement 
Heigh'm, and Anne my Wief, and to the heires males of the bodie of me, 
the saide Clement lawfully begotten, with remaynders, and as by the saide 
deede indented more playnely doth and may appere, my Will and full 
mynde and ys that the saide Anne, my lawfull Wief shall have, holde, 
possesse and enjoye the said manno r of Barrowghe, and all other the 
p'misses according to the state thereof in forme aforesaide, to her and me 
made, withoute any manner of disturbance molestat'on, disquieting or 
hinderaunce of any my heires hereafter \vhatsoeu r , of or any other person 
or persons ; and further, I give and bequeathe unto the saide Anne my 
wief all other my Landes and tennements in Barrow with all and singuler 
thapp'teunce, the which I since that tyme have purchased and bought, 
lyeng and being in the saide Towne of Barrowe, to have and holde unto 
thee saide Anne my Wief and her assigns, during her naturall lyef, the 
remayneder thereof unto the heires males of my bodie lawfully begotten." 

By the inquisition taken at Bury, nth April, 13 Eliz. [1571], on the 
death of Sir Clement Heigham, it was found that he died seised of the 
Manor of Neddynge and lands, &c., hi Chclsworth, Bildeston, and What- 
field, holden of the Crown in capite by the fortieth part of a knight's fee ; 
of the Manor of Barrow, &c., holden of the Duke of Norfolk by one and a 
half knights' fees, of the Manor of Semer, &c., holden of the Crown in capite 
by the fortieth part of a knight's fee ; of the tenement Frezell, in Saxham 
Magna, holden of the Crown by tenth part of a knight's fee ; of messuages 
and lands called Andrewes, in Saxham Magna et Parva, Chevington and 
Ickworth, holden of Thomas Kytson, arm., as of his Manor of Chevington ; 
of two capital messuages in St. Edmunde's, Bury, holden of the Queen of her 
Barony of Bury, of the Manor of Moulton alias Stonyhall, holden of ... 
by half a knight's fee as of the Manor of Clare ; of a pasture called Sutton 
Magna, in Helgaye and Ruston, in Norfolk, holden of Henry Bedingfield, 
knight, as of his Manor of Oxborowe ; also other lands, &c., in Barrowe. 

Sir Clement's and wife survived him, and in accordance with his will 
had the manor during her life. Upon her death, 24th April, 1590, at the 
age of 84, it passed to Sir Clement's son, Sir John Heigham, and a fine of 
the manor and also of Felton's was in 1601 levied by Henry Apleyarde and 
others against him.* He was M.P. for Sudbury in 1563, High Sheriff for 
Suffolk in 1577, M.P. for Ipswich in 1585, and Knight of the Shire for 
Suffolk 1586 and 1603. He was knighted in I579, 3 an< ^ commanded in 

'It was proved in the Prerogative Court 'Fine, East. 43 Eliz. 
30th June. J Lansd. MS. 678. 



BARROW MANOR. g 

1588 on the threatened invasion by the Spanish Armada, one of the Suffolk 
bands of infantry at the camp at Tilbury Fort. Other bands were commanded 
by Sir William Waldegrave, Sir William Spring, and Sir Nicholas Bacon. 
" Each had in his hand 500 men, all choice men, and disciplined and 
singularly furnished.'" When Queen Elizabeth made her progress through 
Suffolk she was entertained by Sir John Heigham at Barrow Hall. In 
1608 Sir John obtained a grant from the Crown for him and his heirs to 
hold two yearly fairs at Barrow. He married 1st, at Barrow, the gth Dec. 
1562, Anne, daughter and one of the heirs of Edmund Wright, of Sutton 
Hall, in Bradfield Combust, and 2ndly Anne, daughter of William Poley, 
of Boxstead, which 2nd wife was buried at Barrow the i3th June, 1623. 
Sir John Heigham died the 2nd May, 1626, at the age of 98, and was buried 
at Barrow, where there is a monument to his memory, the work of Nicholas 
Stone. Sir John's shield in the centre bears quarterly : 1st, Heigham ; 
2nd, Francys ; 3rd, Terringham ; 4th, Patenham ; 5th, Lucy ; 6th, 
Chamberlayne ; yth, Tolthorpe ; 8th, Heigham. 

On another shield, the arms of Wright Sable, a chevron between 3 
fleur-de-lis Or, upon a chief of the last, three spearheads Azure. 

On a third shield, the arms of Poley Or, a lion rampant Sable. The 
epitaph, of which parts are legible, has been purposely defaced, and in its 
place an inscription has been written in memory of Sir John Heigham's son, 
Sir Clement. The inscription thus substituted is as follows : 
Hie requiescit corp' Clementis 
Heigham militis qui hanc vitam 
decessit 25 die Maij, A'no D'ni, 

1634- 

Another monument, a marble tablet, has been raised on the north 
wall of the chancel to the memory of Sir John Heigham, by his great grand- 
son, on which is the following inscription : 

D. 0. M. 

In this place lyeth buried 

the body of 

Sir John Heigham, Knight, 

who departed this life in the xcviii yeare of his age, 
the II day of May, y e yeare of our Lord, 1626. 
Though monuments and all must dy, 
Yet grace bespeaks eternity, 
Not Balaam, but a saint might pray, 
So let me live, and dy, Lord say- 
Who lived and dy'd so long and well, 
In great return of joy doth dwelle. 
Hoc monumentii propriis sumptib. 
Clement Heigham, armig, proavo P.P. 2 

Sir John was succeeded by his son, Sir Clement Heigham, who was 
Knight of the Shire for Suffolk in 1592, and married ist Anne, daughter of 
William CardinaU, of Great Bromley, co. Essex, by Mary, daughter of 
Henry Wentworth, of Mountnessinge, co. Essex, and andly Anne, daughter 
of John Appleyard, of Dunston, co. Norfolk. To this 2nd wife he was married 
at Ditchingham 2ist Jan. 1600, and from her descend the Heighams of 

1 Reyce's Breviary, edited by Lord Francis * Howard's Visit, of Suff. ii. 236. 
Hervey. 



io THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Hunston. Sir Clement Heigham was knighted in 1591, and died 26th May, 
1634, being buried at Barrow, and his eldest son, John Heigham, having 
died in his father's lifetime, was succeeded by his grandson, Clement Heigham, 
whose mother was Philippa, daughter of Robert Bedingfield, of Ditchingham, 
by Anne, daughter of John Appleyard, of Dunston, co. Norfolk. Clement 
Heigham was knighted at Ditchingham loth Jan. 1605, and resided at 
Barrow Hall. He was one of the knights of the projected Order of the 
Royal Oak, and married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Longe, of Fouldon 
and Reymerstone, co. Norfolk, by Elizabeth, daughter of John King, of 
London. 1 

Sir Clement Heigham died and was buried at Barrow 6th May, 1686, 
but in 1677 he had conveyed the Barrow estate to trustees for sale, and in 
1694 his eldest son, Clement Heigham, rector of Barrow, joined with the 
trustees in settling the manor and estate on Sir Thomas Hervey, of Ick- 
worth, in whose descendant, the Marquis of Bristol, the manor is now vested.* 

Arms of PASSELEWE : Bendy Or and Azure, a canton Arg. and a lion 
passant, Gu. Of GIFFARD : Gu. 3 lions passant Arg. Of CRETING : 
Argent, a chevron between 3 mullets pierced Gu. Of TIBETOT : Argent, 
a Saltier ingrailed, Gules. Of HEIGHAM : Sable, a fesse Counter compony 
Or and Azure, between three nags' heads erased Argent. 



FELTON MANOR. 

Felton Manor was held in 1274 by Sir Adam de Creting jointly with 
Nicola his wife, having been acquired from the Giffards. The manor was 
held of Barrow Hall Manor, but an inquisition held at the instance of Roger 
Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, found that " the Manor of Barrow " was held by 
Adam de Creting of Earl Roger by the service of a fourth part of a knight's 
fee. 3 

The extent of the manor was 240 acres of arable land with 6os. (per 
acre 3^.), and i acre of meadow with 3$., half an acre of pasture with 6d., 
23 acres of wood of which 8 acres i rood could be cut every year, 8 acres 
i rood worth 245. gd. per acre, and one windmill worth los. The capital 
messuage with the appurtenances was found to be worth 45. The manor 
was undoubtedly at the time held of William Giffard and Katherine his 
wife. Sir Adam de Creting was slain in 1295, and left Sir John, his son and 
heir, a minor, and Hawise his mother, and his uncle, Sir Edward de Creting 
(who was tenant for life of the manor by gift from his deceased brother) 
held the fee till 1346. 

Sir Edmund de Creting, who was the son and heir of Sir John, in 1356 
sold the reversion to Sir Thomas de Felton, who in 1362 had free warren 
in the manor. He died in 1380, leaving by Joan his wife three daughters- 
Mary, wife ist of Edmund de Hamegrave, by whom she had no issue, and 
2ndly of Sir John Curson, of Beck's Hall, Norfolk, and Sibilla and Alianora. 

Under fines levied in 1388 and 1389 by Robert, Bishop of London, 
Edmund de Stafford, clerk, John Appleby, clerk, Richard de Brenham, 
parson of the church of the Holy Trinity juxta Quenehith, London, William 

'Ancestor of Sir Richard King, Bart. 'I.P.M., 24 Edw. I. 47. 

'See Manor of Ickworth, in this Hundred. 



BARROW MANOR. 



II 



Rykhill, John Curson and Margaret his wife, and Robert Newport against 
Joan, widow of Thomas de Felton, 1 and by this Joan against the petants 
in the last fine 8 the manor was limited in trust for herself for life with 
remainder to Sir John Curson and Mary his wife. Sir John Curson died 
about 1396 in the lifetime of Joan de Felton, widow of Sir Thomas, and his 
son and heir, Sir John Curson, in 1416 released to John Clifton and other 
trustees the manor in settlement. Sir John Curson died in 1472 and 
Thomas Curson, his son and heir, died in 1518, leaving issue by Dorothy 
his wife John Curson, who in 1538 sold the manor to Sir Thomas Kytson, 
of Hengrave, 3 whose widow Margaret took a life interest under his will in 
1575. Sir Thomas Kytson, his son, and his feoffees, this same year [1575] 
sold and conveyed the manor to John, eldest son of Sir Clement Heigham,* 
when the manor went with the Barrow Hall Manor. 

Arms of FELTON : Gules, two lions passant Ermine, crowned Or. Of 
CURSON : Ermine, a bend compony Argent and Sable. 

WOLF HALL OR MUNDEFORD'S MANOR. 

It was in 1239 th e inheritance of Osbert de Mundeford, of Mundeford, 
in Norfolk, he having acquired it from Peter de Barewe. The Mundefords 
were a family of ancient and noble extraction descended, it is thought, 
from Hugh de Montfort, one of the leaders in the army of Duke William, 
afterwards King of England, against Henry, King of France, in 1054. The 
manor appears to have passed from this Osbert to his son, Adam de Munde- 
ford, whose wife was named Margery or Matilda. From him the manor 
passed to his son, John de Mundeford, who married Sibil, daughter of 
Thomas de Ingaldesthorp, and was succeeded by his son Osbert de Munde- 
ford, who married Alice, daughter of John de Tydd, and whose will is dated 
26th August, 1371 .' He died this same year, and the manor passed to his 
2nd but eldest surviving son, Osbert de Mundeford. He married one 
named Elizabeth, and died in 1396,' and was succeeded by his son and heir, 
Osbert de Mundeford, of Hockwold, Norfolk, who married Margaret Barret, 
and by will dated at Hockwold 4th Oct. 14567 gave to the church at Barrow 
6s. 8^., and charged his Manor of Barrow with an annuity of 405. 8 for his 
brother Adam for life, and left Osbert son and heir, who by Elizabeth Barney 
his wife left an only child Mary, married to Sir William Tyndale, or 
Tindal, K.B. 

Sir William Tindale died in 1497,' and was succeeded by his son, Sir 
John Tindale, K.B., who dying in 1521 the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir Thomas Tindale. He married 10 ist Ann, daughter of William 
Paston, and 2ndly Winefred, daughter of Thomas Canze, of Norwich, and 
widow ist of Henry Durne, of Heydon, Norfolk, and 2ndly of Sir Henry 
Farmer, of East Basham. Sir Thomas Tindale, in 1563, sold the manor to 
William Pleasaunce." From him the manor passed to Thomas Pleasaunce, 
who in 1589 sold the same to Martha Heigham." 

'Feet of Fines, 12 Rich. II. 2. 'See Manor of Old Hall, Braiseworth, in 

'Feet of Fines, 13 Rich. II. 20. Hartismere Hundred, and Manor of 

3 Fine, Mich. 30 Hen. VIII. Worlington, in Lackford Hundred. 

4 Fine, Trin. 17 Eliz. I0 In a pedigree given by Davy, Sir Thomas 

5 Proved 24th April, 1372. is said to have married Ann, daugh- 

6 His will is dated Aug. 1396. ter of Sir Ambrose Jermyn. 
7 Proved 2oth Dec., 1456, Reg. Bruisyard "Fine, Trin. 5 Eliz. 

ap. Norwich. "Fine, Mich. 31-32 Eliz. 

"Blomefield says 48 per ann. 



ia THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

This manor was later vested in Sir Samuel Prime, serjeant-at-law, 
afterwards in the Pitches, and later in Thomas Mills, of Great Saxham, 
except the site of the capital messuage, which was vested in John Drinkmilk. 

The site of Mundeford's lies on the right of the road leading from 
Barrow to Hargrave, nearly opposite to Wolfs Hall, formerly Warner's 
tenement. 

Arms of MUNDEFORD : Argent, three fleurs-de-lis, Gules. 




BROCKLEY. I3 

BROCKLEY. 

| HERE was no manor in existence here at the time of the 
Norman Survey. The lands in Brockley were divided 
between the Abbot of St. Edmunds, Roger of Poictou, 
Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, and Robert, son of Corbuzzo! 
Tebald and Rodbert held of the abbot three freemen with 
2 carucates of land and 5 acres meadow, 3 villeins, 6 bordars, 
6 slaves, having 4 ploughteams amongst them ; also wood 
sufficient for the maintenance of 24 hogs. Two of these men could give 
away or sell their land, but by sac, soc and commendation they would remain 
under the abbot. The third, however, could neither sell or give the land 
without the abbot's licence. They were valued at 4. There was also in 
this holding a church living with 6 acres of free land. " It," says the 
Domesday Survey, "is 8 quarentenes long and 5 broad, and pays in a gelt 
jd.'" 

Roger de Poictou held three freemen, one in the jurisdiction of the 
abbot and two in that of the King ; the one could not sell, but the two 
could, and they held jointly 60 acres of land and i acres of meadow, i 
villein, i slave, and i ploughteam valued at ios. 2 

Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, held i socman upon half a carucate of 
land, and 2 acres of meadow, 3 and Robert, son of Corbuzzo, had half a 
carucate of land and ij of meadow, and i ploughteam in Saxon times, 
valued at ios., but at the time of the Survey at 155., which Saiard, a freeman] 
held under the abbot in the time of Edward the Confessor. 4 

BROCKLEY HALL MANOR. 

About 1167 three suits were due from Brockley to the Hundred, 
namely, one for the lands of Peter de Brockley, of Alan de Brockley, and of 
Nicholas de Geddyng respectively. Peter held a carucate of the abbot by 
the service of one knight's fee. Alan and Roger Peter, tenants under him 
of a moiety, held another carucate of the abbot by the service of one knight's 
fee. Nicholas de Geddyng held half a carucate by the service of half a fee, 
which lands were of the Honor of Lancaster, and holden of Matthew, son 
of William, and another half carucate was held by Peter, William Fitz Lee, 
and John Hovel, of William de Bassingham, William Hervey and Roger 
de Kentwell respectively. It was out of the estates of Peter and Alan de 
Brockley, tenants of St. Edmund, that the manors of Brockley and 
Talmages arose. In 1197 Reginald, son of Peter de Brockley, and Peter, 
son of Alan de Brockley, acknowledged that they held of Sampson, Abbot 
of Bury, the one a knight's fee and the other half a fee in Brockley which 
had belonged to the fathers of Peter and Alan. In 1228 Cicely, widow of 
Nicholas de Benhal, released to Reginald de Brockley her claim to dower 
in a carucate of land, the free tenement of her late husband Peter de Brockley, 
and in 1231 Peter, son of Alan de Brockley, released to John de Cramaville 
and Lucy his wife, the advowson of half the church of Brockley. Lucy was 
probably the daughter and heir of Reginald de Brockley. She married the 
2nd time John Algar. By a fine levied in 1253 between Roger Bigot, 
Earl of Norfolk, and John Algar and Lucy his wife, the manor and advowson 
were settled upon John Algar and Lucy for life, with remainder to John de 

'Dora. ii. 358. 'Dom. ii. 3906. 

1 Dom. ii. 3496. 4 Dora. ii. 4256. 



I 4 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Cramaville, son and heir of Lucy, in fee. In 1286 John Algar still held 
the loidship, and held in Brockley of the abbey of Bury for one knight's 
fee, a messuage, and 250 acres of land, 10 acres of wood, 8 acres of 
meadow and pasture, a windmill, and the advowson of the church. 

John Algar also held 64 acres of land of the abbot by the service afore- 
said which his villeins held with their messuages. John de Cramaville, 
who resided at Melford, sold his remainder in 1282 to Robert de Northwold, 1 
who in 1313 settled the manor and advowson on Alexander, son of Ralph 
de \Valsham and Joan his wife, daughter of William de Melford, in special 
tail, remainder to Margaret, daughter of the said Robert, in tail.' 

Sir Alexander de Walsham, the son, in 1342 levied a fine of the manor 
and advowson to ensure to himself in fee. 5 William his son died in his life- 
time, leaving issue John, his son and heir, who was a minor in 1361. John 
presented to the living in 1384, and shortly after the manor and advowson 
passed to the Strange family. In 1385, by a fine levied between John 
Strange and Elizabeth his wife and William Hunt and Elizabeth his wife, 
the manor and advowson were limited to John and Elizabeth in tail, 
remainder to John, son and heir of the said John Strange, in fee. 4 

The manor no doubt came to John Strange through Elizabeth, daughter 
of Geoffrey Boteler, and she after the death of her son John joined her 
husband in 1391 in levying a fine of the manor and advowson to ensure to 
trustees, Thomas Ewell and William Hert, 5 with warranty from her 
heirs, and the same warranty was given to Ralph de Walsham and others 
when they purchased from her and her husband the Manor of Walsham. 6 

As mentioned in the account of Timworth Manor, in Thedwestry 
Hundred, by reason of the son John and the daughter Elizabeth's death 
without issue, this manor became vested in the 3rd child Agnes, who by 
her 2nd husband, Thomas Foderingey, had a son Gerald, upon whom his 
mother in 1435 settled the manor, and he did homage to the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds, for a knight's fee in Brockley. He died subsequently in 
1459, and Thomas Foderingey, his son and heir, succeeded. 

Thomas Foderingey was twice married. By Elizabeth, only sister of 
John, son and heir of William Dorward, of Dorward Hall, in Bocking, 
in Essex, his ist wife, he had three daughters, Margaret wife of Nicholas 
Beaupr, of Outwell, in Norfolk ; Helen, wife of Henry Thoresby, of Bocking ; 
and Christian, wife of John de Vere, afterwards I4th Earl of Oxford. The 
marriage contract between Margaret Foderingey and Nicholas Beaupre 1 is 
given by Blomefield in his History of Norfolk. It is a curious and interesting 
document, and reads as follows : " This indenture made the I4th day of 
November, the yth year of the reigne of King Harry the VII. betwix Sir 
Robert Radcliff and Katherine his wife, on the oon party, and Nicholas 
Beaupre on the other party, witnesseth that whereas the said Sir Robert 
and dame Katherine have in their kepyngand governaunce oon Margaret 
Fodringgey, oon of the daughters and heyres of Thomas Fodrynggey, late 
of Brockley, in Suffolk, gentilman, the said Nicholas, before the feast of 
the nativity of St. John Baptist next comyng, by the assent, help and 
favor of the said Sir Robert and dame Katherine, and for the faithfull love, 
that the said Nicholas hath long time had to the said Margaret, shall by the 

1 Feet of Fines, n Edw. I. 30. 4 Feet of Fines, 8 Rich. II. 17. 

"Feet of Fines, 31 Edw. I. 17. 'Feet of Fines, 15 Rich. II. 13. 

J Feet of Fines, 16 Edw. III. 22. 'Gage. Hist, of Thingoe Hund., 353. 



BROCKLEY. I5 

grace of God, marry and take to wyf the said Margaret, and espowsells 
between them shall be solemmynised, for the which, &c. the said Nicholas 
shall be bound ; and cause also with him, Thomas Beaupre, his father to 
be bound, &c., to the said Sir Robert and Katherine, &c., in the sum of 
xl/. payable &c., and the same Sir Robert and Katherine, &c., graunteth 
by these presents to delyver the said Margaret, to the said Nicholas 
unassured to any person, &c.'" 

Thomas Foderingey, by his will 1490, gave to Margaret his wife his 
Manor of Brockley Hall for life, and she remarried John Drury, who in her 
right held a court for the manor in 1492. On her death the manor passed 
in moieties to Margaret and Helen her daughters, Christian having died 
without issue. The respective husbands of Margaret and Helen held their 
first court in 1499. Margaret died 2Oth Feb. 1514," and her husband a few 
days after her, leaving Edmund Beaupre, their son and heir. 

Edmund Beaupr6 had livery of half the manor in 1521. The other 
moiety was in trustees, George Waldegrave, Philip Boteler, John Jernegan, 
who with Edmund Beaupre held a first court nth April, 1517. George 
Waldegrave and others in 1520 levied a fine of a moiety of the manor against 
Thomas Pakeman and others, 3 and this moiety was purchased by Robert 
Drury, of Hawstead, who died seised of the same 2nd March, I534, 4 when it 
passed to his son and heir, Sir William Drury, who the following year 
acquired the remaining moiety of Nicholas Beaupre and others, 5 and on the 
death of the said Sir William in 1589 the entirety of the manor went to his 
widow Elizabeth, who remarried Sir John Scott, who became lord in her 
right, and held a court for the manor I5th April, 1591. 

On his mother's death Sir Robert Drury, Knt., succeeded, and dying 
2nd April, 1615,' the manor passed to his three sisters and coheirs Frances, 
married ist to Sir Nicholas Clifford, and 2ndly to Sir William Wray, of Glent- 
worth, co. Lincoln, Bart. ; Elizabeth, wife of William Cecil, son and heir 
of William, Earl of Exeter ; and Diana, wife of Sir Edward Cecil, Viscount 
Wimbledon. The ist May, 1617, a court of the manor was held by Sir 
Edward Cecil and Diana his wife, and Sir William Wray in right of his wife 
Frances. 

On the partition of the estates of the Drury family among the coheirs 
of the last Sir Robert this same year this manor devolved on Lady Wray 
by indenture 29th Dec. 1660. Sir William Wray sold it with the advowson 
of Brockley and the manor house called Brockley Hall, for 4,100 to John 
Gipps, of Great Whelnetham, who held his first court i3th June, 1661. By 
indenture dated igth Jan. 1693, made between John Gipps the elder and 
Sir Richard Gipps, son and heir apparent of the said John Gipps and 
Dame Mary, the then wife of the said Sir Richard, the manor was settled to 
the use of John Gipps for life with remainder to Sir Richard Gipps in fee. 
John Gipps died in 1707, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir 
Richard Gipps, Master of the Revels to King Charles and Sir Richard, by 
indenture dated loth Dec. 1708, sold the property for 476, the description 
being the " Manor of Brockley Hall, Talmages-cum-Wyfeldes with the 
rights, easements amd appurtenances except the advowson of Brockley, and 

1 Blomefield, Nori. vii. 458. was levied by William Waldegrave, 

"I.P.M., 6 Hen. VIII. 117. John Heigham, and others, in 1569, 

3 Fine, East. 12 Hen. VIII. against Elizabeth Drury and others 

4 I.P.M., 27 Hen. VIII. 24. (Fine, Easter, n Eliz.). 

'Fine, Trin. 27 Hen. VIII.; a fine 6 1. P.M. at Bury, 6th Aug. 1616. 



16 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

also all that capital messuage called Brockley Hall, and also all that messuage 
or tenement called Talmages, als. Simpson's " to Richard Philips, of 
Ipswich, in fee, and he held his first court in 1709. He was sometime M.P. 
for Ipswich, and married 1st Ann, youngest daughter and coheir of Edward 
Greene, of London, merchant, and 2ndly Frances, eldest daughter of Charles 
Burrough, of Ipswich. He died 8th Jan. 1720, in his 8oth year, and under 
his will dated 1719 the manor was limited in strict settlement upon his son 
Richard for life, with remainder in fee to testator's daughter, Amy Burrough, 
afterwards Dame Amy Kempe, and the testator's grandson, Phillips 
Coleman. 

Lady Kempe, in 1745, devised her moiety of the reversion to her 
brother, Richard Phillips, and he by will and codicil dated respectively 
1737 and 1747 devised the same to George Thomas, of Kesgrave, who in a 
partition between himself and Phillips Coleman, in 1757, became seised 
of the entirety of the estate in Brockley. George Thomas married Sarah, 
daughter of Thomas Jones, of Swansea, and died in 1770, being succeeded 
by his son and heir, George Thomas, who married Anne, daughter and 
coheir of George Cochrane, of Harwich, and died in 1806, leaving his son 
and heir, George Thomas, of Woodbridge, High Sheriff of Suffolk, in 1820, 
who sold the manors to the Rev. Charles Brooke, of Ufford and Blaxhall.' 

He married, I3th December, 1809, Charlotte, 3rd daughter of the Rev. 
Francis Capper, rector of Earl Soham and Monk Soham, and died 3Oth March, 
1836, leaving an only child, Francis Capper Brooke, born i8th Sept. 1810. 
The manor was offered for sale by auction in July, 1838, being described 
as " the manor and estate of Brockley Hall, containing 470 acres of very 
productive arable meadow, pasture land, a farm tenement and agricultural 
buildings, several cottages, &c., in the occupation of Mr. William Cooke." 3 
The particulars of sale stated that of the manor (then called Brockley Hall 
and Talmages with Wifolds) were holden by copy of Court Roll, 10 messuages 
or tenements and cottages, and about 300 acres of land, all subject to fines 
arbitrary on death or alienation, and that the fines received had amounted 
on an average for the last 25 years to about 36. 175. 6d. per annum ; the 
yearly quit and free rents payable to the manor amounted to 14. 75. 
The estate was not sold at the auction, and the price after the sale asked by 
Mr. Thomas, of Woodbridge, for the property was 12,000, the rent of the 
farm being then 500. The property was later bought by private contract 
for the above sum by F. C. Brooke, of Ufford. He married ist isth Aug. 
1839, Juliana- Jemina, daughter of Charles Alix, of Willoughby, co. Lincoln, 
and by her had an only child Alice, born at Rome, 22nd May, 1840, who 
married General E. W. D. Bell, C.B., V.C. F. C. Brooke married 2ndly 
Louisa, 2nd daughter of James Duff, and had issue two sons and two 
daughters. Francis Capper Brooke died in 1886, and the manor is now 
vested in his youngest son, Edward Brooke, of Ufford Place, Woodbridge, 
and of 42, Lower Belgrave Street, London, S.W. 

A fine was levied of the manor, no doubt on effecting some settlement, 
in 1574, by Thomas Knyvett and others against Sir William Drury. 3 

A rental of " Brockley with Talmages and Wifolds 1685 and 1806 will 
will be found amongst the Davy MSS. The total in 1806 was 23 copyhold 
rents amounting to 11. 145. id., and 30 free rents amounting to 
3. I2s. nd. total, 15. 75. 

1 For his ancestry see Manor of Aspal, in = Ifiswich Journal, i6th June, 1838. 
Hartismere Hundred. 3 Fine, Easter 16 Eliz. 



BROCKLEY. I7 

Arms of BEAUPRE : Argent, on a bend Azure a gobon between two 
cross crosslets Or. Of FODERINGEY : Quarterly, Or and Gules, a cross 
lozengy Argent in the 2nd quarter an eagle displayed of the first. Of 
PHILIPS : Sa. a lion rampant, and semee of fleurs-de-lis, Or, a canton 
Ermine. Of BROOKE : Gu. on a chevron Arg. a lion rampant Sa. crowned 
Or armed and langued of the first. 

TALMAGES AND WYFOLDS MANOR. 

The manor lies westward of Brockley Hall. The fee holden of the 
Abbey of Bury by Peter, son of Alan, became vested in his grandson, 
Henry de Brocelege, and he sold half of this fee to William Talmage, whence 
came the name of Talmage's Manor, in Brockley. In 1346 this manor 
was vested in Edmund de Wancey and Peter de la Cresener, probably in 
trust for the family of Talmach. John Talmach, son and heir of Sir William, 
in 1385 released to William Clopton all his rights in his father's lands in 
Brockley. 

In 1440 Sir William Phelip, Lord Bardolph, 1 died seised," and in 1481, 
Anne Broughton, widow of John Broughton, died seised, 3 when the manor 
passed to her son and heir. Sir Robert Broughton, 4 of Denston, being 
seised of this manor, settled it on Katharine his wife for life with remainder 
to himself in tail, and having survived her, married Dorothy, sister of Sir 
Richard Wentworth, and died iyth Aug. 1506,' leaving John Broughton 
his son and heir. The manor was then valued at 12 yearly. A fine was 
levied of the manor in 1514 by George Waldegrave and others against the 
said John Broughton and Anna his wife. 6 Sir Robert Drury subsequently 
acquired the manor, and it descended on his death, 2nd March, 1534,* to 
his son and heir, Sir William Drury, who then had the Manor of Brockley 
Hall, and he and his wife Elizabeth held a court for Brockley Hall and 
Talmages with Wyfolds 2Qth Sept. 1537. 

Sir William Drury died in 1589, from which time the manor has devolved 
in the same way as the Manor of Brockley Hall, the descent of which has 
been already given. 

A rental of the Manor of "Talmages with Wilfoldes in Brockley," 
made ist April, 20 Hen. VIII., for 2^ years, will be found amongst the Davy 
MSS. in the British Museum. 8 

MANOR OF INGHAMS. 

Parcel of the Manor of Brockley Hall, as well as of the Manor of Whep- 
stead, is a deputed manor called Ingham, which took its name from John 
Ingham, who in 1325 acquired the Walpole inheritance. In 1298 a fine was 
levied between Thomas de Walpole, of Brockley, and William de Walpole 
and Cecily his wife, of a messuage, 246 acres of land, half an acre of meadow, 
10 acres of wood, and rents in Brockley and elsewhere. 

In 1313 the lands were settled by Thomas upon himself and Amy his 
wife for life, remainder to his right heirs, rxnd in the following year Simon 
de Walpole conveyed them to William, son of Thomas Giffard, 9 and Amy 

1 See Dennington Manor, in Hoxne Hundred. "Fine, Easter, 6 Hen. VIII. 

'I.P.M., 19 Hen. VI. 30. 7 I.P.M., 27 Hen. VIII. 24. 

3 1. P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 44. "Add. MSS. 19107, fol. 56. 

4 See Manor of Denston Hall, in Risbridge 'William Giffard had free warren in 
Hundred. Brockley in 1321 (Chart. Rolls, 15 

5 1. P.M., at Woolpit, 22 Hen. VII. i. Edw. II. 29). 



i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

his wife for their lives, Amy being probably the widow of Thomas de Wai- 
pole and mother of Simon. In 1317 the reversion was granted by Simon 
de Walpole to John de Ingham, to whom Sir William Giffard released in 
J 335- In I 4 I 3 William de Rokewode, of Acton, enfeoffed Sir Thomas 
Swynburne, John Rokewode, and others of these lands to his use, and died 
in 1422 seised, 1 leaving John his son and heir. 

The site of the manor was then worth nothing, and it was held of the 
Manor of Brockley. Robert Rokewoode in 1498 inherited this property 
from his father Robert. 1 Robert the son and heir died, leaving his sister, 
Margaret Clowel, of Colchester, widow, and John Hanham, of Thorpe, in 
Essex, son of Peter Hanham and Alice his wife, another of the sisters of 
Robert Rokewode, his heirs, who joined with their feoffees in 1529 in selling 
the same to Robert Rokewoode, of Stanningfield. 3 The manor was then 
acquired by John Hangham, who in 1540 sold it to Sir William Drury. 4 

In 1784 the manor was vested in James Sturgeon, for this year he died 
seised of it, when it passed to his daughter and heir Susannah, married to 
the Rev. William Euat Sims. 

The site of the manor, known by the name of Ingham Garden, lies in 
Whepstead on the lower road to Lousell adjoining the lane leading to the 
mill by Cages Green. 



1 1.P.M., 10 Hen. V. 7. sSee Rookwood MS. in Collect. Topo- 

' I.P.M., 13 Hen. VIII. graphica ii. p. 139. 

< Fine, Mich. 32 Hen. VIII. 




CHEVINGTON. Ig 

CHEVINGTON. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds, and consisted of 6 carucates of land, 13 villeins, 
9 bordars, 4 ploughteams in demesne and 4 belonging to the 
men, 6 slaves, 10 acres of meadow, sufficient wood to support 
100 hogs, 22 beasts, 30 hogs, 40 goats, and 3 hives of bees. 
There was also a socman with 30 acres of land, 2 bordars, a 
ploughteam, an acre of meadow, and wood for the main- 
tenance of 4 hogs. Over him the abbot had sac, soc, commendation and all 
customs, and he could not give or sell the land without licence. 

There was a church living with 30 acres of free land. The manor was 
valued then at 6, increased at the time of the Survey to 10, when still 
held by the abbot. At that time there were 7 slaves, 7 rouncies, and 140 
sheep. The size of the manor was 10 quarentenes long and 8 broad, and 
it paid in a gelt fyd.' 

MANOR OF CHEVINGTON. 

The parish of Chevington formed part of the estate of Bretulf, son of 
Leoman, and was granted by William the Conqueror to the monastery of 
St. Edmunds. From its proximity to the monastery it formed a favourite 
retiring place for the abbot of this house, and he maintained a park here 
well stocked with deer. It was from his Hall of Chevington that Abbot 
Thomas wrote to King Edw. II. in 1309 that he was prevented by illness 
from attending Parliament, and here it was that the lawless townsmen of 
Bury found the Abbot Richard de Draughton when they treated him with 
so much indignity. 

" In the time of Abbot Cratfield, whose attentions to the interests of 
the monastery were directed to every part of the property under his care, 
an extent was taken of the manor, when the customs were particularly 
denned. Among the free tenants, liberi tenentes, was Philip de Kedynton, 
who held a messuage, 72 acres of land, and 4 acres of meadow, in respect of 
which, beside rent and service, he was to do one ploughing, arrura, at 
the time of sowing at the Plough-ale, and to find a reaper in autumn for 
one day at the Alebene. William Redenhale, another customary tenant, 
was to do work at the Plough-ale, and Alebene ; and also, to do three 
ploughings at the Lovebene. He was likewise to give for a heriot the second 
beast ; and if there was no beast, 2s. 8^., and his heir, on taking his in- 
heritance, was to pay a fine at the will of the lord. Nothing was to be 
given for the marriage of his heir, whether son or daughter, but all the other 
children were to pay for licence to marry, and were also to give chyldwyte. 
Solomon Milk was to give the best beast for a heriot, et omnes fillij et filice 
dabunt chyldwyt,and in regard to a tenement of John Leman, omnes fillij et 
filice excepto hcevecie faciunt finem pro maritagio suo, et filice dabunt childwyth. 
Some other customs of the manor much resemble those of the neighbouring 
Manor of Hawsted. The customary works have been commuted for money 
payments in the nature of quit rents. In parts of the manor the custom 
of Borough English prevails."* 

'Dom. ii. 357. 2 Gage, Hist, of Thingoe Hundred, p. 324. 



20 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Upon the dissolution of the monastery the manor, with the park and 
advowson, was granted to Sir Thomas Kytson and Margaret his wife in fee. 
Particulars for this grant will be found in the Record Office.' 

Sir Thomas Kitson died nth Sept. 1539,' when the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Sir Thomas Kitson. A copy of a Survey of the manor made 
for this Sir Thomas Kitson in the 2jih year of Elizabeth, is given by Gage 
in his History of Thingoe (p. 325). He also gives an inventory exhibited 
of the Countess of Bath's effects here in 1562. 

Sir Thos. Kytson's son died 28th Jan. 1602-3,' when the manor went 
to his daughter and heir Mary, married to Thomas, Earl of Rivers. Mary, 
Countess Rivers, settled this manor on her daughter, Lady Penelope Gage, 
wife of Sir John Gage, of Hengrave, and was succeeded by her grandson, 
Sir Thos. Gage, of Hengrave. His son, Sir William Gage, and Thomas, 
his son and heir apparent, sold the manor in 1716* to John, Earl of Bristol, 
from whom it descended in the same course as the Manor of Ickworth, in 
this Hundred. Gage, however, in his account of Hengrave, informs us that 
Lady Penelope, on the marriage of her 3rd son, Sir Edward Gage, with Mary, 
daughter of Sir William Hervey, in 1648, gave them this manor and other 
lands in Suffolk. 

A fine was levied of a moiety of the Manor of Cheventon in 1361 by 
Sir Edmund de Wauncy against Walter de Reydon and Elizabeth his wife. 5 
The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Edward Crofte, who died 
1 4th Feb. 1557, leaving Thomas his son and heir, 18 years of age. 6 

' The site of Chevington Hall, on the north-east side of the church, 
is now occupied by a farmhouse ; the deep moat and high rampart remain, 
but there are no vestiges of the real building. The area within the moat, 
which is forty feet wide, excepting at the entrance, where it is broader, 
contains about four acres ; the entrance is by a causeway on the south side, 
but there probably was a drawbridge communicating with the church. 
The terraces cut on the rampart are traceable here and there, and beyond 
the moat on the north side is a mound, used possibly as an outpost or 
observatory. There was an ancient mill belonging to the hall. 

" The hunting lodge stood in the park at some little distance north- 
westward from the hall, and is now the site of a farmhouse which retains 
no traces of the original building. A spot is still called by the name of the 
Dog-kennel, and another is called Ragman's Island. The place has been 
long disparked.'" 



1 D.K.R., 10 App. ii. p. 226. grave and Chevington were vested 

'I. P.M., 32 Hen. VIII. 63. in trustees for sale. (Gage, p. 327. 

I. P.M., Bury, 24th Oct. 1603. Note.) 

4 By virtue of indentures i6th and i7th 'Feet of Fines, 35 Edw. III. 13. 

Aug., 1715, and a recovery suffered "I. P.M., 4 and 5 P. and M. 21. 

in Michaelmas term, 5 Anne, Har- 7 Gage, Hist, of Thingoe Hundred, p. 328. 




FLEMPTON. 21 

FLEMPTON. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds, and at the time of the Survey was held of him by 
Ulward. It consisted of 10 socmen with a carucate of land 
6 bordars, and 3 ploughteams among them all, an acre 
of meadow and a mill. These men were under the abbot 

by sac, soc, and commendation, and they owed service at 

Risby, Lackford, and Hengrave ; also they could not give 

or sell their land without the abbot's licence. The value was 405 There 

was also a. church living with 8 acres of free land. This holding was 6 

quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt 6d. 1 

FLEMPTON MANOR OR GEDDING'S MANOR. 

At the time of the Survey Ulward held here of the Abbot of St. Edmunds 
10 socmen upon a carucate of land. In the time of Edw. I. Sir Benedict 
de Blakenham 2 held the lordship, of which he died seised in 1284, and was 
succeeded by his son and heir, Benedict de Blakenham, who held of Thomas 
de Ickworth by the service of a third part of a knight's fee, a messuage, and 
80 acres of land, 9 acres of meadow and pasture, a water mill, with liberty 
of fishing and foldage, right of boar, paying 35. 6d. to Thomas de Ickworth 
and i&d. to the Abbot of St. Edmunds. 

From this time to the time of Sir John St. Philibert, in 1350, the manor 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Chelsworth, in Cosford Hundred. 
This manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir John de St. 
Philibert, who died in I333, 3 and a fine was levied of it in 1345 by John de 
St. Philibert and Ada his wife, daughter of John de Botecourt against 
Magister Robert de Ereswell, clerk, and Ralph, parson of VVakenhall church, 
with the object of effecting a settlement as mentioned in the account of 
Lackford Manor. 4 In 1352 he conveyed the manor to Thomas de Aspal. 5 

On Sir Thomas's death the manor devolved on his son and heir, Sir 
John de Aspal, from which time to the time of Thomas Lucas, who succeeded 
his father in 1529-30, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Lackford, in this Hundred. 

A fine was levied of this manor in 1407 by Thomas Hethe, Richard 
Hethe, Nich. Hethe, Richard Alrede, and Robert Pope against William 
Geddyng and Matilda his wife, 6 and in 1409 Thomas Gedding had a grant 
of free warren here. In 1434 another fine was levied of the manor and that 
of Lackford by Thomas Westhorp, clerk, against the said Thomas Gedding 
and others. 7 The manor is also specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. 
of Jasper Lucas, who died in 1529-30 . 8 

Thomas Lucas, Jasper's son, with his own son and heir Clement, sold 
the manor to Sir Thomas Kytson, Knt., from whom the manor has devolved 
in the same course as the Manor of Hengrave, in this Hundred, and is now 
vested in John Wood, M.P., of Hengrave Hall. 

'Dom. ii. 3576. 5 Feet of Fines, 26 Edw. III. 10. 

'See Manor of Chelsworth, in Cosford 6 Feet of Fines, 8 Hen. IV. 25. 
Hundred. 'Feet of Fines, 12 Hen. VI. 10. 

'I.P.M., 7 Edw. III. 35. "I.P.M., 22 Hen. VIII. 34. 

4 Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. III. 14. 



22 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Elizabeth 
Croftes, widow, who died gth May, 1519, leaving John her son and heir,' 
and of Edward Croftes, who died i4th Feb. 1557, leaving Thomas his son 
and heir, then aged 18.' 

The manor, with its royalties, rights, members, and appurtenances 
in 1768 consisted of the following : 

I s. d. 
Quit rents of the manor about . . . . . . . . i 13 4 

A messuage or tenement, farm, and lands called Flamp- 
ton Hall farm, in or near Flampton, rented by 
William Stutter as tenant at will at the yearly 
rent of . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 o o 

The yearly profits of Flampton Courts, about . . . . i 13 4 

A Water Mill and lands at Flampton rented by Charles 

Jaques at . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 o o 



278 6 8 
Deduction, the King's rent . . . . . . . . n i 



277 15 7 
At that time the manor (with other lands late the estate of Sir William 

Gage but then of Sir Thomas Gage) stood charged with the following sums : 
The principal sum of 3,700 for the persons named in 

the Will and Codicil of Dame Frances Gage, s. d. 

formerly wife of .Sir Wm. Gage . . . . . . 3,700 o o 

The principal sums of 1,500 and 1,000 for the benefit 

of William Gage Oliveres and Margaret his wife 

and their issue . . . . . . . . . . 2,500 o o 



6,200 o o 

At an assembly I4th Nov. 1745, of Thos. Short, steward of the court 
of the Manor of Flampton, and most of the parishioners, it was proposed 
that every person having rights of common there should for the future 
have " Ye Giving of Two Neat Beasts for every five pounds p. ann. rent 
and so in proportion for every greater or less sum." 

" Comoning Houses and their Rents : - Number of 

s. d. Neat 

Beasts. 
Isaac Peak .. .. .. 500.. 2 



Mrs. Gage's 



Ralph ffirmin and John Copsey 15 o o 



Thomas Turner 3/., Roger 

Holmes 2/. . . ..500.. 2 

Mr. Kent . . Markall's and Wilson's . . 45 o o . . 18 

Spicer 300.. i 

Cooke . . . . . . . . 10 o o . . 4 

Mr. Spink's . . . . . . 37 o o . . 14 

Bowen . . . . . . 10 o o 4 

Mr. Wilson . . . . . . 10 o o . . 4 

140 oo.. 55 

Q. whether 2 Horse Kind be no Equivalent to 3 neat Beasts. 
The Hall Farme and the Mill have no right of Comon." 

1 1.P.M., 12 Hen. VIII. 63. I.P.M., 4 and 5 Phil, and M. 21. 




FORNHAM ALL SAINTS. 23 

FORNHAM ALL SAINTS. 

I WO manors were held here in Saxon times by the Abbot of 
St. Edmunds. One consisted of a carucate of land, 4 
bordars, a ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the 
men, a slave, 4 acres of meadow, a mill, 2 rouncies, 14 beasts, 
30 hogs, and 60 sheep. There were also 3 socmen with 30 
acres of land and half a ploughteam. These men held under 
the abbot with sac and soc, commendation and all customs, 
but they could not give or sell the land without licence. 

The second also was a manor of the abbot having formerly belonged to 
two freemen. It consisted of i carucates of land, a villein, 3 bordars, and 
2 ploughteams, and these men could give or sell the land by sac, soc, and 
commendation remaining under the abbot. The value was 405., the freemen 
not included. There was also a church living with 12 acres of free land. It 
was 8 quarentenes long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt lod. At the time 
of the Survey these manors still belonged to the abbot. 1 

FORNHAM ALL SAINTS MANOR. 

Among the early possessions of the monks of St. Edmund were the 
Fornhams, anciently distinguished as Major and Minor, separated from 
each other by the River Lark, the former consisting of the parish of All 
Samts, in the Hundred of Thingoe, and the latter comprehending the parishes 
of St. Genevieve and St. Martin, in the Hundred of Thedwestry. Alnothus, 
an officer or minister of King Edward the Confessor, is said to have bestowed 
the one and King Edmund, son of Edward the elder, the other. 

Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, before the close of the I2th century 
confirmed to his clerk, Roger de Walsyngham, for his fidelity and services, 
the tenement which Baldwin the priest, of Hargrave, held in Fornham 
Major ; and also granted to him the land of JElric, son of Derulfy, which 
the same Roger bought in the court of St. Edmund of Maud Wymart, 
the daughter of ^Elric. Stephen de Walsyngham bestowed these lands in 
free alms on the Prioress of St. George of Thetford, who gave the tenement 
in fee-farm to John Walsyngham in tail, remainder to his brother Stephen 
in tail, at an annual rent of 6os. 

These grants were the origin of a reputed manor in Fornham All 
Saints, called Aldred's, the estate at a later time of Richard Aldred, and 
which, in 1445, became again united, under a licence of alienation from 
the Crown to the possessions of St. Edmund. 

In 1286 the Abbot of St. Edmunds was chief lord of the town, and 
held here, as of his barony, a messuage and 360 acres of land, 60 acres 
of meadow, and 7 acres of wood, together with liberty of foldage, warren, 
and other rights, and also the advowson of the church. The villeins of the 
abbot held 116 acres with their messuages, and the cottarii 4 acres ; and 
among the chief owners of lands holding mediately or immediately of the 
abbot were Sir Edmund de Hemegrave, Richard de Heyham, Gilbert 
de Derham, Henry Fitzwilliam, and Adam Henewold." 

An extent and customary of the lands of the monastery of Bury here 
in 1357 will be found amongst the additional MSS. in the British Museum. 3 

'Dom. ii. 3576. 3 Add. MSS. 14849. 

"Gage, Hist, of Thingoe Hund. p. 240. 



24 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

On the dissolution of the monastery of St. Edmund the Manor of 
Fornham All Saints, of which Aldred's was parcel, became the property 
of Sir Thomas Kytson. 

Particulars for the grant to him, 31 Hen. VIII., will be found in the 
Public Record Office. 1 Sir Thomas Kitson died nth Sept. 1539, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas Kitson. 2 

From this time to the present the manor has devolved in the same 
course as the Manor of Hengrave, in this Hundred, and is now vested in 
John Wood. 

In 1768 the manor consisted of : 

(1) A messuage or tenement and farm called Fornham Hall, s. d. 

in the parish of Fornham, rented by Isaac Cook at . . 150 o o 

(2) A messuage or tenement, and farm called Aldrich Farm, 

in the parish of Fornham, rented by Francis Hanton at 83 o o 

(3) The quit rents of the Manor of Fornham . . . . 29 i o 

(4) Profits of Fornham Courts . . . . . . 29 I o 

(5) A messuage or tenement and farm called the Tolegate 

Farm or House, in Bury St. Edmunds, rented by Thomas 

Hunt at . . . . .. 30 o o 

(6) A messuage or tenement and lands in the parish of 

Bury St. Edmunds, rented by Ashley Palmer at . . 15 o o 

(7) Woods situate in the parish of Barrow, containing 90 

acres, rented by Francis Everet at . . . . 72 o o 

(8) A piece of meadow ground in the parish of Barrow, 

containing 16 acres and a half, at . . . . . . n 10 o 

(9) A messuage or tenement and farm called Sexton's 

Farm, in the parish of Westley, rented by Thomas 

Hunt at . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 o o 

489 12 o 

" To the manor of Fornham All Saints," says Gage, 3 " belong Babwell 
Mill and parts of Babwell Fen, which lie in St. Edmondsbury and Fornham 
St. Martin, and which, in virtue of a bull from Pope Alexander III., had 
been appropriated by Hugh, Abbot of St. Edmunds', ad mensant et ad 
canter am abbatis. Contiguous to the mill stood the Convent of Friars 
Minors, called Babwell, on the banks of the river, within the parish of 
Fornham All Saints. This religious house was founded by Richard, Earl 
of Gloucester, and Gilbert his son, after a disgraceful attempt on the part 
of the friars, chiefly instigated by Earl Richard, to intrude themselves into 
the jurisdiction of St. Edmund. 

" Among the lands of Babwell Fen, belonging to the Manor of Fornham 
All Saints, are the Bell Meadow, and Mermayden Field, or Long Sponge. 
In the latter are certain store ponds of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, called 
the Mermaid Pits, where some love-sick maid is said to have perished. 
As to the Bell Meadow, it takes its name from the dedication of the profits 
of it, made by the testament of John Perfry, of St. Edmondsbury, draper, 
a copyhold tenant of the manor, which bears date the 28th May, 1509, 
and contains the following device : ' I woll that my close, which is holyn 
by copy off my Lord Abbot off Bury Seynt Edmond's and y e which 1 



1 D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 226. 
M.P.M., 32 Hen. VIII. 63. 



3 History of Thingoe Hund. p. 245. 



FORNHAM ALL SAINTS. 25 

purchasyd off Thomas Russell, gentylman my lord payd the resydu 
I give toward y e ryngers' charge off the gret belle in Seynt Mary Chirche, 
called Corfew Belle : an I wylle y e the chirche reeves for y e time beyng 
shall take yt upp, by copy, to the seyd use, affter my dycese . . .' 

"It is recorded on the Court Rolls in 1766, that ' besides the yearly 
rent of 55. 6d. paid by the feoffees of the meadow to the lord of the manor, 
the churchwardens or feoffees are obliged to send in at every general Court 
Baron, to be yearly holden for the said manor on Tuesday next after the 
feast of St. Michael, at Fornham All Saints Hall, six bottles of wine, that 
is to say, four of French and two of Spanish wine, for the use of the lord 
steward and suitors of the said manor, as in times past they have heretofore 
done.' " 

" Fornham All Saints Hall or Grange," says Gage,' " where the manor 
court continues to be held, stands east of the church, near the highway 
leading to Fornham St. Genevieve. A moated building converted into 
dwellings, called Aldridges, near the church on the north side, occupies 
the site of Aldred's, which was an occasional retreat of Abbot Boon." 

Deeds relating to the manor and estates, &c., t. Will. I. 1442, in a I5th 
century transcript will be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the 
British Museum/ and t. of Hen. VIII. in the Record Office. 3 

ALDRED'S MANOR. 

There was a reputed manor of this name in Fornham All Saints, the 
estate of Richard Aldred, 4 whose will is dated 8th March, 1446, and who 
died in 1448.' He was sheriff of Essex and Herts, and one of the 
executors of the will of Queen Catherine. 6 He left a son and heir, Sir 
Wm. Aldred, born in 1433, who was a soul priest in 1487 of Diss, Norfolk. 
The manor became united 23 Hen. VI. by licence from the Crown 7 to the 
possessions of the Abbot of St. Edmunds. A moated building called 
Aldridges, near the church on the north side occupies the site of Aldreds, 
and was an occasional retreat of Abbot Boon. 8 



'Hist, of Thingoe, p. 255. 5 I.P.M., 26 Hen. VI. 

2 Add. MSS. 34689. "See M. 4 - (i) Welsh Records. Recog- 

3 Exch. of Accounts, ist Rep. on Public nizances, Rolls of Chester. 

Records (1800) 187. 7 I.Q.D., 23 Hen. VI. M. 84. 

'Regist. Curteyspars. 2 MSS. ; Add. MSS. "Hengrave Evid. 1598- 

7096. 




26 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HARDWICK MANOR. 

AVY considers it doubtful whether a manor existed here. 
He was probably not aware of the Court Rolls of the Manor 
of Hardwick in the time of Edw. III. still preserved in 
Pembroke College.' As to the customs of Hardwick, see 
the ist vol. of the Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute of 
Archaeology (p. 177). 

The estate was in the Crown in the time of Hen. I., and 
was granted to the monks of St. Edmund and to their cellarer. The 
principal mansion has long been known by the name of Hardwick House. 
The monks had claimed it as parcel of the fields of St. Edmund under a 
charter of Edmund, son of Edward the Elder, in 945, and it was held by the 
monastery in demesne. 

The cellarist had three fields, one at the east gate, another at the 
Risby gate, and the third on the heaths and pastures here, which from the 
flocks and herds that depastured them, took the name of Herdwyke. 

The charter of King Stephen's is the confirmation of a prior right. With 
the monastery this estate remained until the Dissolution, when by letters 
patent 2Oth Aug. 1546, it was granted by the description of all the woods, 
underwoods, lands, and hereditaments, called Herdwyke-wood containing 
by estimation 50 acres in Bury St. Edmunds, Nowton, Stanefelde, and 
Great Horningsherth, to Sir Thomas Darcy, afterwards Lord Darcy, of 
Chick, by the service of the twentieth part of a knight's fee. 

It next became the property (Davy says by grant from Queen Mary) 
of Sir Robert Southwell, 2 Master of the Rolls, younger brother of Sir Richard 
Southwell, of Wood Rysing, in Norfolk, who died seised thereof in 1558, 
and Sir Robert Southwell, his grandson, sold the same in 1585 by bargain 
and sale 26th March made to Thomas Goodrich, Richard Rushbrook, and 
Stephen Potter, Thomas Goodrich, of Clifford's Inn, London, being the 
beneficial grantee. 

On the 3rd May following Sir Robert Southwell covenanted with 
Thomas, Richard, and Stephen that he and Elizabeth his wife would 
suffer a recovery of the closes and hereditaments called Herdwyk, or Herd- 
wykwode, in Bury St. Edmunds, Nowton, Stanefeld, and Great Hornings- 
herth, with the perpetual discharge of tithes and other liberties to enure 
to the said Richard Rushbrook and Stephen Potter during the life of the 
said Thomas Goodrich, and after his decease to Margaret his wife for life, 
remainder to Isaac Goodrich, eldest son of the said Thomas in tail, 
remainder to Thomas Goodrich, 2nd son of the said Thomas in tail, with 
power of revocation, which he exercised by deed dated 20th May, I587. 3 

Gage mentions that on the I5th Feb. 1588-9, Goodrich, probably in 
consequence of some defect in the original patent, surrendered this property 
to her Majesty, who on the 4th April following granted it to Richard Bran- 
thwaite, of London, and Roger Bornley, of Bagworth Park, co. Leicester, 
by whom on the following day it was reconveyed to Goodrich. 

By his will dated 25th Oct. 1597, Thomas Goodrich willed that Margaret 
his wife should have to her and her heirs all his lands in Bury, and all his 
lands and tenements called Hardwick, lands in Suffolk, with full power to 
sell the same at her discretion, to the intent to maintain herself and bring 

1 ist Rep. Hist. Com. 70. 3 Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, p. 476. 

See Manor of Hoxne, in Hoxne Hundred. 



HARDWICK MANOR. 27 

up her children, and to give them reasonable portions at their several 
ages of one-and-twenty, or at their days of marriage; and also that she 
should, at her good will and pleasure, maintain her father and mother, and 
her brother Edward, in all things necessary and convenient during their 
lives ; and that his daughter Frances should remain with her said father 
and mother. And all his goods and chattels he gave his wife for that 
intent, and appointed her sole executrix. 1 

In 1601 Margaret, widow of Thomas Goodrich, then the wife of John 
Bull, of Hardwick, joined with her trustees in the sale of the estate to Thomas 
Stanton, of Bury St. Edmunds, mercer. 

In 1610 Sir Robert Drury, of Hawstead, was a purchaser from Thomas 
Stanton, in consideration of 1,100, and " being minded to build an alms- 
house for the perpetual habitation and dwelling of 6 poor women un- 
married," he shortly afterwards enfeoffed Sir Nicholas Bacon and other 
trustees with this property to the intent to demise the same for ever to 
such person as should be lord for the time being of his Manor of Hawsted, 







HARDWICK HOUSE. 

for a term of years, determinable on such person ceasing, by death or other- 
wise, to be lord of the same manor, reserving a perpetual rent of 52 to 
be applied for the benefit of the persons dwelling in the said almshouses, 
and for other charitable purposes ; Sir Robert charging his manor of Haw- 
sted with an annuity of 20 in aid of the said rent. 

After the death of Elizabeth Drury, the only surviving child of Sir 
Robert Drury, he retired from his Manor of Hawsted hither, and in 1613 
obtained licence from the Archbishop of Canterbury that until a chapel 
should be built to be duly consecrated, prayers might be said and sacraments 
administered in his mansion of Hardwick House, for the benefit of himself 
and his wife and household, and the widows inhabiting his almshouses, 
with necessary faculties for Richard Brabon, Bachelor in Divinity. 

The chapel then contemplated was never erected, and Lady Drury, 
the year after her husband's decease, obtained a renewal of the licence, 
the grounds stated for which are these : Et simul insinuatum nobis est, 
dictas edes tuas de Hardwick olim pertinuisse ad csenobium sive monas- 
terium Sancti Edmundi predicti, ita ut facile colligi non potest, intra cuius 
ecclesie fines dicte edes scite sunt, et communis opinio magis est dictas edes 

1 Gage, Hist, of Thingoe Hund. p. 476. 



28 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

extra fines et limites cuiusquam parochie scitas esse : ideo ex uberiore 
gratia nostra ad humileur petitionem tuam tibi concedimus, ut non solum 
habeas licentiam peragendi divinas preces matutinas et respertinas singulis 
diebus dominicis et festivis in dicto loco ; sed etiam sacras conciones habendi, 
et sacramentum caene Domini ibidem celebrandi, quoties vel per adversam 
tuam valetudinem, aut per celi intemperiem commode ad ecclesiam 
Buriensem accedere non possis, &c.' 

Under Sir Robert Drury's feoffment Hardwick virtually became a 
leasehold estate perpetually annexed to the Manor of Hawsted. Sir 
Robert Drury died 2nd April, 1615.' 

A list of pictures in Hardwick House is given in the Davy MSS. Thingoe, 
vol. i. fol. 95. 

Sir William Drury is supposed rather to have repaired than rebuilt 
Hardwick House ; for a century afterwards Sir Thomas Cullum purchasing 
Hawstead Place expended in 1656-1660 2,500 on the reparation of Hawstead 
and Hardwick. In Sir Thomas Cullum's interleaved copy of the History 
of Hawstead, ed. 1784, in his own handwriting, is : ' In the account book 
of Sir Thomas Cullum the purchase of Hawstead and Hardwick is put 
down thus 1656 Hawsted and Harfat with charges and 1,000 repayr 
19,000 : in 1660 Hawsted and Hargate 20,500." 



'Cited, Gage's Hist, of Thingoe, p. 477. M.P.M., Bury, 6th Aug. 14 Jac. [1616.] 




HARGRAVE. 2g 

' HARGRAVE. 

IT the time of the Survey a manor was held here by William 
de Wateville, formerly by Alviet, a freewoman under the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds, who could not sell, and consisted 
of 4 carucates of land, 6 villeins, 4 bordars, 4 slaves, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne and 2 belonging to the men, a horse, 2 
beasts, 5 hogs, 4 acres of meadow, and wood for the main- 
tenance of 16 hogs. There was also a church living with 
12 acres of free land, valued at 4. When the Survey was taken there were 
8 villeins, 7 bordars, 2 slaves, the horse had disappeared, there were 8 beasts, 
40 hogs, and 100 sheep. It was 8 quarentenes long and 5 broad, and paid 
in a gelt 7^.' 

HARGRAVE MANOR. 

William the Conqueror is said to have given the whole of this vill to 
the monastery of St. Edmund, but at the time of the Survey it was parcel 
of the fee of William de Wateville, and in the bull of Pope Eugenius IV. 
to Abbot Anslem in 1147 Hargrave is expressly confirmed to the monks 
as a possession newly acquired. 

As to William de Wateville, the tenant in capite named in Domesday 
book, he took his name, we apprehend, from the village of Vatteville, near 
Seine, of which the Earl of Mellent was chief lord, and where he had a castle. 

Willielmus de Watevilla is a witness to a charter of Robert de Mellent 
to the abbey of Jumieges, about the time of the Norman Survey ; and he 
himself gave to that monastery, with the consent of his wife, the church, 
fair, and tithes of Croixman, in the Pays de Caux." 

Abbot Sampson gave to Durand le Squire by homage and service 8 
acres of land here, once held by Walter the Priest, paying z6d. to the Hall 
of Hargrave. 

Abbot John confirmed these lands to Ralph the Falconer, of Barrow ; 
and in 1302 Robert Payne did homage to Richard, abbot of the said con- 
vent, for his lands in Hargrave. John Payne petitioned Abbot John for 
licence to build a chapel in his court in this parish where mass might be 
celebrated, because his residence being distant from the church, he had a 
difficulty in getting to it in winter. 3 

The manor having passed to the Crown on the dissolution of the Abbey 
of Bury, King Hen. VIII. in 1539 granted the manor and advowson to Sir 
Thomas Kitson, of Hengrave, and Margaret his wife and to his heirs, the 
manor having been leased shortly before by Abbot Melford to Edmund 
Reeve, of St. Edmondsbury, for 40 years, at the rent of 14. 135. 4^., 
payable to the abbot and his successors, and 45. yearly for staff-acre to 
the cross bearer. 

Particulars for the grant to Sir Thomas Kitson will be found in the 
Public Record Office. 4 

Sir Thomas Kitson died in 1539, from which time to the time of Sir 
Thomas Gage in 1726 the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor 
of Hengrave. The Gages sold the manor to the Earl of Bristol. Augustus 
John Hervey, 3rd Earl of Bristol, died seised of it in 1779, from which time 
it has descended in the same course as the Manor of Ickworth, and 
is now vested in the present Marquis of Bristol. 

'Dom. ii. 435. 3 Page, Hist, of Suffolk, p. 650. 

'Gage, Hist, of Thingoe Hund. p. 337. '31 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. 216. 




30 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HAWSTEAD. 

YVO holdings were in this place at the time of the Survey. 
The first was that of 28 freemen, and consisted of 4 carucates 
of land, and i held by Odo, 2 by two clerics, Albold and 
Peter, and 20 acres by Agenetus. There were also 3 villeins, 
31 bordars, 13 ploughteams, 2 slaves, 16 acres of meadow, 
and wood to maintain 3 hogs. These men could give or 
sell their land, the sac, soc, and commendation remaining 
in the abbot's possession. The value was 4. There was also a church 
living with 30 acres of free land. The holding was 8 quarentenes long and 
6 broad, and paid in a gelt i&d. At the time of the Survey this estate was 
part of the possessions of the Abbot of St. Edmunds.' 

The second holding was that of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, and 
formerly of two freemen under Wisgar and in his soc, but they could sell 
without licence. It consisted of 15 acres and half a ploughteam valued at 

3*-' 

HAWSTEAD MANOR. 

Leofstan, server of Abbot Leofstan, and Stannard, his kinsman, are 
said to have given Hawstead to St. Edmunds in the time of the Confessor, 
but, as Gage points out, the earliest chartularies of the monastery, namely, 
the Registrium Nigrum and the Registrium Sacrists, do not mention Haw- 
stead amongst the places in which these persons gave lands. 

At the time of the Survey, as we have seen, Odo held i carucate, and 
the two clerks, Albold and Peter, 2 carucates, the whole being parcel of the 
fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, of which Odo and Albold held in socage. 
Albold was the ancestor of the family of Noel, founders of the priory of 
Ronton, in Staffordshire, and out of his lands here and those of Odo arose 
the Manor of Hawstead, while out of the fee of Ralph, surnamed de Hal- 
stead, mentioned in Abbot Baldwin's feudal book, 3 the Manor of Hawstead 
Place, otherwise called Talmage's and Bokenham's, took their rise. 

The earliest donation to the abbey appears to have been that of Odo 
and Leveva his wife of the lands which he held there at the time of the Survey, 
and the gift was confirmed to the monastery for the use of the altar by King 
Hen. I. Odo, the grantor, is styled the goldsmith in a subsequent con- 
firmation of the said charter. 

Anselm, who was Abbot of St. Edmunds from 1119 to 1148, gave to 
William, son of Albold, and Robert, his son and heir, in fee farm as a com- 
pensation for some claim and by way of exchange for the churches of 
Barton and Culford, the land in Hawstead of Geoffrey, sacrist of the 
monastery, which had belonged to Leveva, late wife of Odo the goldsmith, 
reserving a rent of 405. to the altar of St. Edmunds. 4 

Robert, the son and heir of William fitz Albold, bore the name of 
Noel, and in 1180 we find that Abbot Sampson confirmed to " Thomas," 
son of Robert Noel, the grant of lands in " Halsted " made to their ancestors 
by Abbot Anselm, his predecessor, and by another charter he gave to the 
same Thomas Noel the whole socage which William fitz Albold and Walter 
his son, uncle of the said Thomas, held in Halstead, Esfeld, and St. 
Edmondsbury. 5 

1 Dotn. ii. 357*. 4 Regist. Nigr. fol. 96. 

'Dom. ii. 3916. 'Regist. Nigr. fols. 201-222. 

1 Regist. Nigr. fol. 132. 



HAWSTEAD. 31 

Thomas Noel married Margaret, eldest daughter of Guy, sister and 
coheir of Ralph le Strange, of the house of Knockyn, who remarried Thomas 
de Blankminster. Thomas Noel died about 1207, leaving issue two 
daughters and coheirs Alice, wife of William de Harcourt, who gave to 
King John a hundred marks for his marriage, and Joan, wife of Thomas 
fitz Eustace fitz Stephen, who gave the King for his marriage three hundred 
marks, three palfreys and a hawk. On the partition of the Noel inheritance 
Hawstead fell to the share of Joan fitz Eustace. 

In 1222 William de Harcourt and Alice his wife and Thomas fitz 
Eustace and Joan his wife paid relief for the lands of Margaret le Strange, 
mother of Alice and Joan. Thomas fitz Eustace died in the lifetime of 
Joan his wife, who remarried Sir Alexander Bacon, whom she also survived. 
There were issue of Thomas and Joan, Thomas, their son and heir, who was 
the father of Sir Eustace, Sir Robert, and John. Sir Eustace, the eldest 
son, married Joan la Colville, by whom he had Thomas fitz Eustace and 
Roger, rector of Hawsted, and dying about 1271 the Crown claimed the 
wardship of his infant heir and took possession of all his lands. 

Simon, Abbot of St. Edmunds, however, petitioned the Crown for the 
custody of the Manor of Hawstead, to which the King was not entitled 
under the provisions of the Great Charter of Hen. III., and 28th May, 1272, 
the King's escheator, Richard Clifford, was directed to deliver up the land 
to the abbot. The abbot subsequently sold the wardship of the manor to 
William Clifford for 20 sterling. 

In 1286 a survey was taken of the manor before the King's Justice in 
Eyre, and a copy of this will be found in Cullum's History of Hawstead. 
The following is a summary : 

Thomas fitz Eustace, the chief lord, held here of the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds a messuage and 240 acres of land, 10 acres of meadow and 
10 acres of wood, a windmill, liberty of foldage, boar and sow, together 
with the advowson of the church ; and did one suit for himself and his 
tenants to the Hundred of Thingoe every three weeks, paying 30^. yearly 
to the bailiff of the Hundred, and 405. to the shrine of St. Edmund ; and 
theabbot held of the King in chief ; and the same Thomas held of the 
abbot by the aforesaid service nine score acres, which the villeins held of 
him with their messuages. And there were various tenants therein named 
holding of the same Thomas. 

The other principal tenants were Sir William Talmach, Philip Noel, 
Walter de Stanton, Robert de Ros, John de Beylham, Richard de Saxham, 
and William Cramaville. 1 

The lands of William Talmach will be noticed presently. He had a 
grant of free warren in 1297. 3 

In 1292 Sir Thomas fitz Eustace had a grant of free warren, 3 and the 
same year did homage to the Abbot of St. Edmunds for his lands in 
Hawstead. 

Sir Thomas fitz Eustace was twice married. By his ist wife Margaret, 
he had issue two sons, Thomas and Robert, and a daughter Margaret. 
His 2nd wife, by whom he does not appear to have had any issue, was 
Amy, daughter of Sir Thomas de Grey by Alice, daughter and sole heir of 
Sir Richard de Cornherth. By a fine levied in Trinity term in 1316, he 
settled his Manors of Hawstead and Codenham upon himself and Amy 

'Gage, Hist, of Thingoe Hund., p. 415. 'Chart. Rolls, 20 Edw. I. 58. 

"Chart. Rolls, 25 Edw. I. 17. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



in special tail male, remainder to his son Robert in fee, and dying in 1318, 
his Lincolnshire, Buckinghamshire, and Herefordshire estates devolved 
upon Thomas, his eldest son and heir, and his Suffolk property passed to 
Robert fitz Eustace, his 2nd son. In 1331 Sir Robert fitz Eustace obtained 
a grant of free warren in respect of his lands here,' and left issue Sir John 
fitz Eustace, his son and heir. 

In 1353 Sir John fitz Eustace and Elizabeth his wife sold the manor 
and advowson to Sir William de Middleton and Isabella his wife.' Sir 
William's chief seat was at Middleton Hall, in Mendham, Norfolk, of which 
county he was sheriff in the 2oth and 25th years of Edw. III. 

An extent of the manor was taken by Sir William Middleton on the 
feast of St. Michael the Archangel in 1358, preparatory to a sale to the 
Clopton family. This, as given by Gage, is as follows : - 

" There was a manor, with curtilages and gardens, pigeon-house, and 
windmills. The arable lands consisted of 572 acres, of which 353 a. 3 p. 
were demesne of the manor, and 218 a. i p. newly purchased lands, com- 
prising, among others, Nowell's and Stanton's tenements. The woods 
contained 40 acres ; the meadow and pasture lands were calculated at 
about 50 acres, beside pasture for 24 cows round the woods, and for 12 
oxen and 12 stotts at Nowell's and Stanton's. The profits of court were 
665. 8d., certain free tenants doing suit and service every three weeks ; 
and the free tenants paid rents 635. nd. and rendered 3 pecks and 3 
quarters of oats, and 5 cocks and hens. The lord had the wardship and 
marriage of the heir of his free tenants. 

" The native paid rents, amounting to iiijs. iiijrf. beside offering 
silver, xviijrf. and one cock and 18 hens and performed works." 3 



1 Chart. Rolls, 5 Edw. III. 39. 

'Feet of Fines. 27 Edw. III. 20. 

3 The general customs of the manor affect- 
ing the copyhold tenants may be 
gathered from the following note 
of a holding of the manor : 

" Thomas Frame holds a mes- 
suage, which was formerly Rayson's, 
with those thirty acres of land and 
pasture that belonged to him, ex- 
cepting a piece of land called Pese- 
lond medwe, and an acre and one 
rood of land abutting on Langtheg- 
medwe, paying yearly at the feast 
of Easter and St. Michael, be equal 
portions, xxs., and at the Nativity 
of the Lord iiijrf. called Offryng 
Silver, also at the same time one 
cock and two hens. And he shall 
mow the meadow of the lord four 
whole days ; and all the customary 
tenants when they mow the lord's 
meadow.shall have alike one bushel! 
of wheat for making their bread 
and \\d. for drink, and the whole 
produce of the dairy of the manor 
for one day for cheese. And he 
reaps in autumn for eight whole 
days and he shall have each day 
a loaf of bread, fifteen of which are 
made of one bushel! of wheat, and 



two herrings for his meal at noon. 
And he shall give merchet and 
heriot. And he shall be head 
reaper, and shall be acquitted of 
half the rent and service in that 
year in which he shall be in office; 
and he shall have meat and drink 
at the board of the lord, if the lord 
keeps house ; and if he does not, 
he shall have com by livery, as of 
one of the household ploughmen. 
And he shall have one horse stand- 
ing at the manor at the expense of 
the lord, to serve for his business. 
His son may marry without the 
lord's leave, but his widow may 
not ; and she shall have for her life 
the aforesaid tenements, doing the 
accustomed sendee (cited). (Gage, 
Hist, of Thingoe, p. 418-419.) 

The annual outgoings of the 
manor at this time were : To the 
sacrist of St. Edmunds xls. to the 
Hundred of Thingoe ijs. iiijrf. to the 
aforesaid Hundred for Nowell's 
tenement xvijrf. to the same Hun- 
dred for Stanton's tenement viijrf.. 
paid at Nowton Hall for Nowell's 
tenement \ii\d. and for Stanton's 
tenement viijrf. 



HAWSTEAD. 33 

In 1360 Sir William Middleton sold the estate in Hawstead to Sir 
William Clopton for 600. 

Gage says that by virtue of a fine levied in Trinity term in the 33rd 
year of Edw. III. [1359] between Sir William Middleton and Isabella his 
wife, the manor and advowson of Hawstead became limited to Sir William 
de Clopton and Mary his wife for life, with remainder to their son, Thomas 
Clopton, in tail male, remainder to the right heirs of Sir William. The 
fine, however, under which the estate passed from the Middletons to the 
Cloptons seems to have been levied in 1360, and was between Sir William de 
Clopton and Maria his wife, pet. and Sir William de Middleton and Isabella 
his wife, deforciants.' 

Sir William Clopton was the elder brother of Sir Thomas Clopton, who 
is said to have acquired Kentwell by marriage with the heiress of Mylde. 
He was the son of Walter de Clopton of Wickhambroke, who died in 1326, 
son of William de Clopton, of Wickhambrook, who died in the reign of 
Edw. I., son of Walter de Clopton, son of William t. Hen. II. and Rich. I., 
son of Walter, son of William. Sir William de Clopton's will is dated 
1376, and he desires in it to be buried in the church of the Friars minor, 
at Babewell. The only gifts of land are : " Item, lego Willielmo filio meo 
in mesuagio meo de Haukedone unam carucam cum bestiis et toto apparatu, 
decem quarteria frumenti, decem quarteria hordei, decem quarteria pisarum, 
et decem quarteria avenae. Item, lego Waltero filio meo in manerio de 
Toppisfeld in villa de Hadleye unam carucam cum bestiis, et toto apparatu, 
decem quarteria frumenti, decem quarteria hordei, decem quarteria pisarum, 
et decem quarteria avenae. Item, lego Edwardo filio meo in manerio de 
Neueham in villa de Aschdone unam carucam cum bestiis et toto apparatu, 
decem quarteria frumenti, decem quarteria hordei, decem quarteria 
pisarum, et decem quarteria avenae. Item, volo quod Robertus camerarius 
meus habeat totum tenementum vocatum Gobilionns cum omnibus perti- 
nentiis in villa de Boxsted ad terminum vitae sicut ei ante fuerat concessum 
per me." 2 

The testator died in 1377, having been twice married. By his ist 
wife Anet, daughter of Sir Thomas de Grey, he had issue four sons Sir 
William de Clopton, Edmund, who married Blanche fitz Eustace, John, and 
Walter ; and by his 2nd wife Mary, daughter of Sir William Cockerel, who 
survived, he had Thomas, on whom Hawstead was limited in remainder 
expectant upon the decease of his father and mother, and on his dying 
without issue the manor devolved on his elder brother, Sir William Clopton, 
as right heir. Sir William Clopton granted a lease of the manor in 1410 
to Walter Bone, of Bury St. Edmunds, a copy of which is given in Cullum's 
" History of Hawsted." The landlord reserved to himself the advowson 
of the rectory, with the wards, marriages, reliefs, and escheats, besides the 
manor house, with its chambers, kitchen, mill-house, a stable with its 
chambers, a garden near the house, and all the ponds. The tenant was 
to maintain all the houses and walls (except those which the lessor reserved 
to himself) in covering and daubing, and was not to lop and shred the trees 
about the borders of the enclosures nor those that immediately surrounded 
the manor house. He was to receive at the beginning of his term several 
head of live stock, the price of which was fixed, and which he was to deliver 
up at the expiration of the term, or their value in money, at the option of 

1 Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. III. 7. "The will was proved I4th Jan. 1377, at 

Norwich. (Harl. Ch. 43 T. 27.) 



34 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

the landlord. He was also to leave, at the end of his lease, as many acres 
as well ploughed, sown, and manured as he received at first. The landlord 
was not to interfere with his tenants' servants, nor with the culture of land, 
nor prosecute any of those servants, nor any tenants of the village, either 
during or after the lease for any trespasses committed during that term. 
If the rent was in arrear, either in part or in the whole, for a fortnight after 
the two days of payment, the landlord might distrain ; if for a month, 
re-enter and re-possess. Each of the parties bound themselves to forfeit 
100 upon the violation of any part of the agreement. 

Sir William Clopton in 1414 sold the manor or the reversion expectant 
on the lease above to his cousin William, son of Sir Thomas Clopton, of 
Kentwell. 1 

A copy of the deed of sale will be found in Gage's History of Thingoe 
(p. 420), and an interesting account of the disturbance of the Cloptons by 
the Fitz Eustaces is given by Gage. He says : " The possession of the 
Clopton family was occasionally disturbed by the Fitz Eustaces, who 
pretended a claim to the estate. Sir William de Clopton, the son of the 
purchaser, recovered damages in an action in the King's Bench against 
Philip fitz Eustace and others for an outrageous trespass committed on 
the Sunday before Michaelmas in 1397 when they cut down and carried 
off timber with goods and chattels to the alleged value of 40. Pending 
the suit, which lasted some years, Robert fitz Eustace released all claim in 
the Manor of Hawsted to Sir William de Clopton. 

" The matter, however, did not end here, for in the time of William 
Clopton, of Kentwell, fresh claims were made, grounded on a settlement 
pretended to have been made by Sir John fitz Eustace in 1343, whereby the 
manor and advowson were said to have been granted and confirmed by his 
feoffees, Sir Robert Bretoun, knight, William de Rokeland, and Robert 
de Hildercle, to Sir John fitz Eustace and Elizabeth his wife in tail, remainder 
to himself in fee ; in virtue of which, and of seisin pretended to have been 
given under another deed or power-of-attorney, the property was alleged 
to have descended from Sir John fitz Eustace and Elizabeth to their son 
John, whose daughter and heir Elizabeth was then the wife of Robert 
Eland, of Raithby, in the county of Lincoln, he claiming the same in her 
right. 

' The Cloptons, it seems, accused Eland of having erased the settle- 
ment, and of having substituted an estate tail for a limitation in fee to Sir 
John fitz Eustace ; and as the erasure and alteration were not to be denied, 
Eland, by way of bravado, charged Sir William Clopton with putting the 
seal of his arms to a false and forged deed, which was a mere pretence, and 
summoned his opponent to answer him in the Court of Chivalry par voie 
d'armes. This did not silence Sir William Clopton, who indicted Robert 
Eland and his wife, together with Roger Barnardiston, of Kedington, under 
the statute of I Hen. V. for having on the 3rd September, 1429, forged at 
Kedington, and having, on the Sunday before the Exaltation of the Holy 
Cross in the same year, caused to be published there and at Melford, the two 
false deeds above referred to, by virtue of which the said Robert and 
Elizabeth claimed the manor and advowson of Hawsted, to the disturbance 
of the possession of the said William Clopton and William Galyon, a 
co-feoffee, and to their damage of one thousand pounds. The matter 

'See Manor of Kentwell Hall, in Long Melford, Babergh Hundred. 



HAWSTEAD. 35 

was subsequently brought to a reference, and the award against Eland 
made m the twelfth year of the King, is not without interest.' 
A copy of the award is given by Gage. 2 

Evidently, to confirm the Clopton title, a fine was levied of the manor 
and advowson in 1434 by William Clopton, William Galyon,and Philip 
Mannok against Robert Eland and Elizabeth his wife. 3 

William Clopton 4 died in I446, 5 leaving John Clopton his son and heir, 
by his 2nd marriage, whose son and heir, Sir William de Clopton in 1505 
exchanged the property with Sir Robert Drury, son and heir of Roger 
Drury, for his manors of Henstead and Beaustones, in Suffolk, and also in 
consideration of a thousand marks, of which two hundred were paid down, 
and the remainder agreed to be paid by instalments at the rood altar in 
the church of the monastery of St. Edmund. 

In Sir Robert Drury, therefore, became united the possession of the 
manors of Hawstead and Bokenham, the former acquired by exchange and 
the latter derived by inheritance. 

Sir Robert Drury was a member of Lincoln's Inn, and in 1474 became 
reader of the Society. Subsequently he was chosen Speaker of the House of 
Commons, and made one of the Privy Council to King Hen. VII. He 
obtained a licence in 1502 from Pope Alexander VI. to have a private 
chapel in his mansion at Hawstead, and amongst the State Papers in 1509 
we find a licence for him to enclose with walls and towers Hawstead Hall, 
Bukenhams and Onehouse Hall manors. 6 

The same year (not in the 20th year of Hen. VIII. as stated by Gage) 
Sir Robert had a licence to empark 2,000 acres of land and 500 acres of 
wood, with free warren of fishery in Hawstead, Whepstead, Great 
Horningsheath, Nowton, Onehouse, Buxhall, Harleston, Shelland, Rede, 
Chedbury, Chevington, Hartest, Somerton, and Brockley." 

Sir Robert Drury died 2nd March, 1535-6," and was buried according to 
his desire in the church of St. Mary, in Bury St. Edmunds, where his 
altar tomb with the recumbent effigies of himself and Anne, his ist wife, 
daughter of Sir William Calthorpe, is to be seen on the south side of the 
chancel. His 2nd wife, by whom he had no issue, was Anne, daughter of 
Edward Jerningham, of Somerleyton. His will is dated ist May, 1532, 
and by it he appointed his sons William and John executors, his wife, Lady 
Gray, and his daughter Jermyn and her husband supervisors of his will. 
He directed black gowns to be given to all his sons and their wives, and his 
sons-in-law and daughters, and to all the women of his household, and coats 
to the men, beside mourning to other persons therein named. And he 
requested his executors to cause a thousand masses to be said for the weal 
of his soul afore his thirty day if they could, or else as soon after as they 
might. And he willed that his house be kept conveniently, and not 
sumptuously, at his cost and charges, after his decease for the space of 

'Gage, Hist, of Thingoe Hund. p 421. 'I.P.M., 25 Hen. VI. 37. 

'Hist, of Thingoe, p. 422. 6 S.P. i Hen. VIII. 

'Feet of Fines, 12 Hen. VI. 7. ?S.P., i Hen. VIII. 947. 

'See Luton's Manor, Long Melford, in "I.P.M., 27 Hen. VIII. 24 [1536]. See 

Babergh Hundred. See portion of D.N.B. xvi. 57. 

an unexecuted or cancelled will of 

William Clopton. (Harl. Ch. 58 G. 

28, and Howard's Visit, of Suffolk, 

i. 42.) 



36 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

two months ; and at the day of his burial and at his thirty day, he would 
have a convenient diet for such as should be there, and not much super- 
fluous. And at his thirty day he would have every man and woman that 
should have gowns to be there if they could, and that day he would have 
delivered to every man and his wife dwelling in Hawsted xijrf. to give for 
his soul to such as were of their household, where they thought best and 
most need. And every widow there to have xi]d. t and this to be delivered 
to them at his mass, the same thirty day. And he willed that every man 
and his wife and widow dwelling in Whepsted, Lawshall, Moche Whelnet- 
ham, and Nowton, to have viijrf., at mass in their own time upon his thirty 
day. And every curate for their mass and dirge said there viijrf., and all 
priests being there iiiijrf. every of them. And all the persons dwelling 
in the said towns to take their rewards at the time of the mass said in their 
towns the said thirty day, and none of them to come to Hawsted, nor to 
the town where it should happen him to be buried. And he willed that 
every poor house in Bury, such as should be appointed and named by both 
curates of both the parishes, his cousin Lee and his cousin Croftes, to have 
vii]d. and every prisoner in Bury gaol to have in money \\\}d. and ijs. in 
bread, and iijs. in wood amongst them. To the Friars of Babwell he gave 
xls. and x combs wheat and xx combs barley, to the Friars of Clare and the 
Friars of Sudbury xls. each, to pray for the souls of himself, his wives, and 
parents. And he would have no common dole published in no wise. And 
the testator gave to his wife and her sons, William and Robert, plate of the 
value of 100 marks apiece. And to his wife, beside chapel ornaments and 
hangings and effects therein specified, all her apparel, with her chains, 
brooches, and rings, and the tapestry she brought with her. To his son 
William, all the bedding and hangings in his own chamber, and the coffers 
in the same, and all the evidences concerning all the hereditaments 
which he had willed him, and the boxes which the same were in. And he 
bequeathed to his said son all the hangings in the great chamber, the 
parlour, and the hall ; all his bedding and hangings in the chapel chamber 
and the chamber over the gate, the garden chamber, the green chamber, 
and the lower chamber, at his place in Hawsted ; and all the coffers in the 
great chamber, the chapel chamber, the chamber over the gate, and the 
lower chamber, and all the carpets usually belonging to the same, and all 
the boards, stools, and chairs being within any of the said chambers, the 
hall, and the parlour, and iiij. beds the yeomen lay on when strangers came. 
And among other things he gave to his son William his chain with his cross, 
and half his apparel, and the other half to the testator's son Robert. And 
to the said Robert all his hangings, bedding, and stuff of household at his 
place in St. Clement's parish, in London ; and among other things, his best 
bed of cloth of tawney baudekin, with counterpoint and curtains. To 
each of the testator's daughters, a standing cup gilt covered, worth ten 
marcs. To his wife, Lady Gray, her white ambling gelding, his sumpter 
horse and two nags, xl". in money, his sheep at Tudenham to the number 
of four hundred, and the inheritance of his house in College Street, St. 
Edmundsbury, which according to the agreement on his marriage was 
to be hers. And subject to various legacies to different persons he directed 
the residue to be disposed of for the benefit of his soul." 1 

Sir William Drury, eldest son and heir of Sir Robert, succeeded to the 
lordship, and was one of the first of the Suffolk gentry to espouse the cause 
of Queen Mary, being at that time one of the knights of the shire. 

1 Gage, Hist, of Thingoe Hund. p. 432-3. 



HAWSTEAD. 37 

He was one of the commissioners named on the Queen's coming to 
the throne, for inspecting the ordnance and stores, and a commissioner in 
the 2nd and 3rd year of Philip and Mary for raising the subsidy in the County 
of Suffolk ; and the Queen, for his good services, beside an annuity of 100 
marks which she bestowed upon him at her accession, gave him at different 
times portions of the spoils of the church. 1 

Sir William Drury, by his will dated 26th Dec. 1557, and proved 2Qth 
April, 1558, bequeathed his body to be buried within the church of Hawstead 
by his ist wife, according to his degree, appointing Elizabeth his wife 
executrix and Richard, Lord Rich, supervisor, giving him for his pains a 
gilt cup with a blue flower on the top. After bequeathing his vessels of 
household and kitchen utensils to his wife and son, he gave to his wife the 
manors of Hawsted Hall and Talmage, otherwise called Bokenhams, and 
all his lands in Hawsted, Nowton, and Sidolsmere, which were his father's, 
Sir Robert Drury, for 10 years following the testator's decease, toward 
the payment of his debts and fulfilling his will ; but his daughter, 
Dame Mary Corbet, to have in farm the site of the Manor of Hawsted Hall, 
with all such pasture and meadow ground as Roger Hawsted lately occupied 
therewith, paying yearly to his wife during the said 10 years iiij 1 '. 

Sir William Drury died nth Jan. 1557-8. His ist wife was Joan, 
daughter and heir of Sir William St. Maur, and his 2nd Elizabeth, daughter 
and coheir of Henry Sotehill, of Stoke Fasten, co. Leicester, by whom only 
he had issue, being succeeded by his grandson and heir William, a minor, 
afterwards Sir William Drury, eldest son of Robert, by Audrey his wife, 
daughter of Lord Rich, Lord Chancellor of England, who had died in his 
father's lifetime, viz., 4th Dec. 1557.* 

In the second volume of the Proceedings of the Suffolk Institute, 
page 275, will be found an inventory of Robert Drury 's goods at Haw- 
stead Hall in 1557. A fine was levied of the manor in 1569 by William 
Waldegrave, John Heigham, and others against Elizabeth Drury, widow, 
and others. 3 

Sir William Drury, the grandfather, lies buried in Hawstead church, 
and Sir John Cullum gives the following description of the monument 
erected to his memory : 

" On the top of an altar monument of Sussex marble, in the south- 
east corner of the church, is the portrait in brass of a knight in armour, 
between his two wives, about 2 feet high ; his hair is clipped short, his 
whiskers and parted hair are long, his armour is flourished with some 
different metal, with large protuberances at the shoulders ; at his neck and 
wrists are similar narrow ruffs or ruffles ; his toes are very broad. The 
ladies are habited both alike ; though this should not have been, for one 
died at least 40 years before the other ; the first, dying as has been said 
before, in 1517 ; the other surviving her husband, as is represented by her 
eyes being open, while those of the other are closed. The hair had now 
been dressed for some time in a much less forced and unnatural fashion, 
parted in the middle and gracing each temple. The cap, now become of a 
moderate size had assumed a not inelegant curve in front, and was embel- 
lished with a fillet ; the mantle, or upper garment, has round hanging 
sleeves, reaching to the ground , the ruffs at the neck and wrists are the 

' Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, p. 434- ' Fine > Easter - " Eliz ' 

'I. P.M., 4 and 5 Ph. and M. 51. 



3 8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

same as the man's ; as are also the broad toes, and unbecoming protuber- 
ances at the shoulders ; the sexes, it is observable at all times following 
each other's fashion in several particulars of their dress. The beads had 
quitted the girdle, and given place to the bible, which hung by a ribbon 
almost as low as the feet. This description has been the more minute as 
it may ascertain the date of similar figures that have lost their inscriptions. 
The age of these is fixed by the following epitaph on a brass plate : - 

" Here lyeth clothed now in earth Syr Wyllm Drury, knyght, 
Such one as whylest he lyved here was loved of every wyght : 
Such temperance he dyd retayne, such prudent curtesy, 
Such noble mynde, with justice joynd such lyberality ; 
As fame ytself shall sound for me the glory of his name 
Much better than this metall mute can ay pronounce the same. 
The leventh of frosty Janyver, the yere of Christ, I fynd, 
A thousand fyve hundred fyfty seven his vytall thryd untwind. 
Who yet doth lyve, and shall do sty 11 in hearts of them yt knew hym. 
God graunt the styppes of such a stok in vertues to ensue hym." 

Beneath the two ladies are figures of several children, with their names- 
Robert, \Yilliam, Henry, Roger, Anne, Mary, Elizabeth, Fraunces, Bryget, 
Wynefryd, Ursula, Audrey, Dorothy, Marget, Kateryn, Dorothy, 
Elizabeth. 

Sir William Drury, the grandson, married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir 
William Stafford, of Blatherwick, in the County of Northampton, Lady of 
the Bedchamber and Privy Chamber to Queen Elizabeth. He was Sheriff 
of Suffolk in 1583, and one of the representatives in Parliament for the 
county in 1585. He is not unfrequently confounded with another Sir 
William Drury, who was Governor of Berwick and President of Munster, 
and died in Ireland in 1579. This latter Sir William, however, was of the 
house of Besthorp, and brother of Sir Drue Drury. 

Sir William Drury, of Hawstead, in 1589, while in the command of a 
Hampshire regiment of 1,000 men, and accompanying General Lord 
Willoughby to France in the expedition sent in aid of King Hen. IV. of 
France, was killed in a duel with Sir John Borough. 

Sir John Borough was colonel of a Sussex regiment of 1,000 men, and 
the duel took place shortly before 2ist Jan. 1589-90. 

At the time of his death Sir William, who had been granted the receiver- 
ship of the counties of Essex, Herts, and Middlesex, and of the City of 
London, was in the Queen's debt to the amount of over 3,000, and a great 
portion of his lands was sold after his death to make good the deficit.' 
He lies buried in Hawstead church under a mural monument consisting of 
a basement, on which is a sarcophagus of black marble beneath a double 
arch, supported by Corinthian pillars. Over the arch, in an oval frame, 
is a bust in armour life size. The oval frame surrounding the bust is thus 
inscribed : 

Memoriae Guliel : Drurii equit : aur : 
Qui tribunus militum obiit in 

Gallia anno do mini 1589. 

Hoc monumentum fieri jussit 

Robertus Drurius fil. eques aur : 

Uxor faciendum curavit. 

1 N. and Q. loth ser. vii. 205. 



HAWSTEAD. 39 

Sir William Drury 1 left issue six children, and the manor passed to his 
eldest son and heir, Sir Robert Drury, knighted for valour at the siege 
of Rouen by the Earl of Essex, in 1591, being then only in his i6th year 
He was forgiven the balance of the debt, some 600 odd, owing by his father 
to the Crown, as a reward for his, Sir Robert's, services. He is well known 
as the patron of Dr. Donne. In 1603 he was elected one of the knights of 
the shire, an honour which he enjoyed as long as he lived. He married 
Anne, daughter of Sir Nicholas Bacon, of Redgrave, Bart., eldest son of the 
Lord Keeper, and had issue two daughters, Dorothy and Elizabeth, who 
both died young. On Dorothy, who died at the age of four, is the following 
epitaph at Hawstead, supposed to be from the pen of Dr. Donne : 

" She little promis'd much. 

Too soon untied 
She only dreamt she liv'd 
And then she dyde. 

A fine was levied of the manor by Richard Brabon and others against 
Sir Robert Drury in 1599." 

Sir Robert Drury died 2nd April, 1615, when his estates devolved on 
his three surviving sisters : (i) Frances, wife ist of Sir Nicholas Clifford, 
by whom he had no issue, and afterwards of Sir William Wray, of Glent- 
worth, in Lincolnshire, Bart.; (2) Elizabeth, wife of William, 2nd Cecil, 
Earl of Exeter ; and (3) Diana, wife of Edward, Viscount Wimbledon. On 
the 2nd April, 1618, partition was made between the coheirs by virtue of 
which the manors of Hawstead and Bokenhams or Hawstead Place and the 
advowson of the church and the chief part of the lands in Hawstead were 
limited to Sir William Wray and Frances his wife in strict settlement, and 
the remaining part was assured to Viscount Wimbledon, then Sir Edward 
Cecil, and Diana his wife in settlement. 

Frances, Lady Wray, died in 1642, leaving Sir Christopher Wray, of 
Ashby, in the County of Lincoln, her eldest son and heir, who by Albinia 
Cecil was father of Sir William Wray, Bart., and other children. In 1656 
by deeds dated I4th and 15th Oct., Sir William Wray, the grandson and 
heir of Frances, joined with Albinia his mother and his younger brother, 
Drury Wray, and Edward Wray and other trustees, in a sale of the Manor 
of Hawstead and Bokenhams, and the advowson of the church, and all 
their lands in Hawstead, in consideration of 17,787 to Thomas, afterwards 
Sir Thomas Cullum, Bart. 

The family of Cullum were settled at Thorndon, as appears by the 
wills of Walter'Cullum, proved in October, 1454, and John Cullum, his son, 
proved 4th June, 1483, both extant in the archdeaconry of Sudbury. This 
last-mentioned John Cullum resided at Stanhill, in Thorndon, and married 
Mary Applewright, and by his will directed his body to be buried in the 
churchyard of Thorndon, appointing a secular priest to pray and sing for 
his soul, to be paid by his son Thomas, and bequeathed several legacies to 
religious men. He left with other issue a son, John Cullum, who married 
Rebecca, daughter of Thomas Smythe, of Bacton, co. Suffolk, by whom 
he had two sons, one of whom was Thomas Cullum, the purchaser of this 
manor. He was sent to London to carve out a fortune for himself, and lived 

1 His widow married Sir John Scott and 3 Fine, Easter, 41 Eliz. 
died shortly before ist March, 
1598-9. See D.N.B. xii. 60. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



in Gracechurch Street, where he prospered to such an extent as to become 
one of the Sheriffs of the City in 1646, and Alderman of Cordwainer Ward. 
He was a member of the Drapers' Company, and for eight years farmed a 
portion of the excise duty, deriving a large fortune from the transaction. 
In 1647 he was committed, together with the Lord Mayor and others, to 
the Tower on a charge of high treason, the allegation being that they were 
concerned in some measures in the city in favour of the Royal cause. 

On the Restoration he was created a Baronet by patent bearing date 
i8th June, 1660. He had a pardon under the Great Seal I7th July, 1661, 
for all offences committed by him before the 2Qth of the preceding December, 
which seems somewhat strange in view of his imprisonment for the Royal 
cause in 1647, but there may have been some temporizing during the period 
of the ursupation, or some technical offence which rendered such a pardon 
expedient. 

He married, i8th Feb. 1622-3, Mary, 2nd daughter and coheir of 
Nicholas Crispe, of the City of London, merchant,' uncle of Sir Nicholas 
Crispe, Bart., and had a numerous issue. In his will, dated 2nd May, 
1662,* he bequeathed to the master and wardens of the Drapers' Company 
four houses in or near Trinity Minories parish, in London, in trust to pay 
5. IDS. yearly to the poor of Hawsted for ever, and a street in London 
still bears Sir Thomas's name, where he had considerable property, of which 
he just escaped seeing the destruction by the fatal fire of 1666. The 
testator in his will notices that he had settled on his eldest son Thomas 
divers houses in London and the estate of Hawstead and Hardwick, which 
was more than equal to "any right he might claim from the custom of the 
City of London, and that he had settled upon his 2nd son John his late 
house in Gracechurch Street, with other property. He died 6th April, 
1664, and was buried in the chancel of the church of Hawstead, this manor 
passing to his eldest son, Sir Thomas Cullum, 2nd Bart. He was celebrated 
for his hospitality, particularly during the Christmas festivities, when he 
gave a peck of wheat and a stone of beef to each of the poor who stayed at 
home. He married 27th May, 1656, Dudley, 3rd daughter of Sir Henry 
North, ist Bart., of Mildenhall, and coheir of her brother, Sir Henry, 2nd 
Bart. He died in October, 1680, and was i6th Oct. buried at Hawstead, 3 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Dudley Cullum, 3rd Bart. 

He was educated at Bury School and at St. John's College, was High 
Sheriff of the County of Suffolk in 1690, and in 1702 represented that county 
in Parliament, after a severely-contested election. For several years he 
resided chiefly at Hawstead Place, being remarkably fond of his garden, 
into which he introduced most of the curious exotics then known in England, 
particularly orange trees, which in 1694 thrived at Hawstead in the most 



'She died 22nd July, 1637, a e d 36, and 
her epitaph, written by Sir Thomas 
himself, is rather curious : 
Her corpes interr'd lies hear, 

Which liv'd with a free spirit, 
Who by God's mercie, 

And her Saviour's meritt, 
Departed in assured hope, 

And certain trust, 
To reign eternallie 

Amongst the just. 
To live and die well 

Was her whole indeavor, 



And in assurance died, 

To live for ever, 
ff that all woman wer but near so 

good as thee, 
Then all men surely might in wives 

right happie bee, 
Would any know how virtus rare 

in hir did take, 
I say no more : she was a Crispe, 

born of a Pake. 
2 Proved 2oth May, 1664. 
'Will I3th Sept. 1679, proved ist Feb; 
1680-1. 



HAWSTEAD. 41 

luxuriant manner. He corresponded with the philosophic gardener and 
planter Evelyn, who, in fact, directed Sir Dudley's botanical pursuits. 
No doubt Evelyn was frequently in the neighbourhood, and was at the time 
a mortgagee of the Finborough property, near Stowmarket, then held by 
Mr. Wollaston. Sir Dudley married twice--ist 3rd Sept. 1681, Anne, 
daughter of John, ist Lord Berkeley, of Stratton, and andly I2th June, 
1710, Anne, daughter of James Wicks, of Bury St. Edmunds, who remarried 
the Rev. John Fulham, rector of Compton, co. Surrey, Archdeacon of 
Llandaff, and Canon of Windsor. Sir Dudley Cullum died i6th Sept. 
1720, aged 63, without issue, 1 when the manor passed to his cousin and 
heir, Sir Jaspar Cullum, 4th Bart., son of John Cullum, of London, brother 
of Sir Thomas Cullum, 2nd Bart., by Anne, daughter of Thomas Lawrence, 
of Woodborough, co. Wilts. 

Sir Jasper Cullum was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1771-2, when Arundel 
Coke was executed for maiming and disfiguring Mr. Crispe, of Bury. The 
unhappy culprit, to avoid the crowd likely to attend such a spectacle, 
desired if the Sheriff thought there was no hope of a pardon to suffer early 
in the morning, and his request was complied with. 

Sir Jasper married 27th Jan. 1697-8, Anne, daughter and heir of William 
Wyatt, of Bursledon, co. Hants., and dying 4th Nov. 1754, at the advanced 
age of 84, left an only son, Sir John Cullum, 5th Bart. In the early part of 
his life he resided at Hawstead and at Hardwick House, and in the latter 
part at Bury St. Edmunds, and was a Justice of the Peace for that borough 
nearly 30 years. 

He married ist, in 1728, Jane, daughter and heir of Thomas Deane, 
of Freefolk, co. Hants., and 2ndly, at Ely Chapel, Holborn, 30th Nov. 1731, 
Susanna, daughter and coheir of Sir Thomas Gery, of Great Ealing, in 
Middlesex, Knt., one of the Masters of the High Court of Chancery, by 
Elizabeth, niece of Sir John Wilteuronge, Bart. Sir John Cullum died 
at his house in Bury St. Edmunds, i6th Jan. 1774, in his 75th year/ and 
was buried at Hawstead, the following inscription being placed on his 
monument : 

" Stop, reader, nor with heedless steps pass by, 
Where all the amiable virtues lie. 
Open and candid through life's ev'ry part, 
Whate'er he spoke flow'd genuine from the heart, 
Himself, thus guileless, he suspected none, 
And suffer' d many wrongs, but ne'er did one, 
Tho' clouds overcast this good man's middle day, 
Bright he beheld his sun's declining ray. 
At last, all peace and harmony within, 
His body free from pain, his soul from sin, 
He pass'd to Heav'n without one groan or sigh : 
God grant me thus to live, and thus to die." 

The manor passed to his son and heir, the Rev. Sir John Cullum, 6th 
Bart., the historian, of Hawstead. 3 He was born at Hawstead 21 st June, 
1733 and educated at Bury School, from whence he proceeded to Latham 
Hall, Cambridge, of which, after having taken the degrees of Bachelor an 

- I7I6> 3 

March, 



42 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Master of Arts, he was elected Fellow 7th Dec. 1757. In March, 1774, he 
became a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries ; in December in the same 
year was instituted to the living of Great Thurlow, which he held with the 
rectory of Hawstead, and in March, 1775, was elected a Fellow of the Royal 
Society. Sir John married Peggy, only child of Daniel Bisson, of West 
Ham, co. Essex, and dying at Hardwick House gth Oct. 1785,' without 
issue, the manor passed to his widow for life, and on her death, 2nd Aug. 1810, 
to Sir John's brother, Sir Thomas Gery Cullum, 7th Bart. Like his brother, 
he was a Fellow of the Royal Society and Society of Antiquaries, and ist 
Sept. 1774, married Mary, daughter of Robert Hanson, Knight of the Order 
of St. Joachim, and dying 8th Sept. 1831,* the manor passed to his son 
and heir, the Rev. Sir Thomas Gery Cullum, 8th Bart., who married ist 
27th Aug. 1805, Mary Anne, only child of Thomas Eggers, of Woodford, 
co. Essex, and 2ndly, 3Oth April, 1832, Anne Lloyd, sister of William 
Hanford Flood, of Flood Hall, co. Kilkenny. Sir Thomas Gery Cullum, 
8th Bart., died 26th Jan. 1855, at the age of 67,' leaving an only daughter 
and heir by his ist wife, Arethusa Susanna, and the manor passed to his 
widow for life. The daughter Arethusa Susanna, 23rd Feb. 1832, married 
the Right Hon. Thomas Milner-Gibson, of Theberton House, M.P. He 
died 25th Feb. 1884, and she 22nd Feb. 1885. Lady Cullum, widow of 
the 8th Bart., died in Feb. 1875, when the manor devolved on her grandson, 
George Gery Milner-Gibson Cullum, F.S.A., of Hardwick House, 2nd son 
of the said Thomas Milner-Gibson, who on succeeding to the Cullum estates 
assumed by Royal licence I3th Dec 1878, the name of Cullum. He was 
High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1888, and amongst other works of learning and 
research has produced a valuable genealogical work on the Rays of Denston. 

Arms of MIDDLETON : Sable, a fesse Ermine between three crosses 
moline Or ; Of CULI.UM : Az. a chevron Erm. between 3 pelicans Or vulning 
themselves ppr. 

MANOR OF BOKENHAM al. TALMACHE. 

The fee which Ralph de Halsted held in Hawstead in the time of 
Will. I. continued in his family during the whole of the I2th and part of 
the I3th century. According to the Liber de Consuetudinibus S. Edmundi, 
Ralph de Halsted held one knight's fee of Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
and John de Halsted at the same time held 30 acres de wara. 

Abbot Sampson granted to Robert, son of Ralph de Halsted, a meadow 
in Hawsted belonging to Horningsherth Hall. Robert succeeded to the fee 
in Hawsted. Simon, Abbot of St. Edmunds, from 1237 to I2 79 na d the 
wardship of the heir of Sir Robert de Halsted, after whose decease the fee 
became the property of Sir William Talmach and Cecily his wife, probably 
the heir of trie Halsted family. 

Cecily survived her husband and died at Hawstead in 1281, leaving 
William her son and Gilbert de Melton, her chaplain, executors of her will. 
The manor passed on her death to her son and heir Sir William Talmach, 
who married a person of the name of Cecilia. 

In 1286 Sir William the son is stated to have held here a messuage 
and 280 acres of land, 12 acres of meadow, 24 acres of wood, I windmill 
with liberty of foldage and other rights of the Abbot of St. Edmunds as 

'Will ist Dec. 1784, proved ;th Nov. 1785. 'Will proved March, 1855. 
'Will proved Dec. 1831. 



HAWSTEAD. 43 

one knight's fee, and he did one suit for himself and his tenants in the 
Hundred every three weeks, and paid to the bailiff xi]d. yearly, and also 
-paid for castle ward at Norwich every 20 weeks 35., and the abbot held of 
the King ; there were 32 acres of land which the villeins of the lord held 
with their messuages. 1 

In 1297 Sir William Talmach had a grant of free warren in his lands 
in Hawstead, Brockley, and Somerton, 3 and died prior to 1313, when a 
fine was levied between Cecily his widow and Thomas Parson, of Somerton, 
and Roger Parson, of Hawstead, of two messuages and 6 carucates of land 
in Hawstead, Brockley, Somerton, and Hartest to enure to Cecily in tail, 
remainder to John, son of Sir William Talmach in tail, remainder succes- 
sively to his brothers William, Edmund, and Thomas Talmach in tail, 
remainder to her right heirs. 

In 1382 John Talmach, son and heir of Sir William, released to Walter 
Amyas, clerk, Robert de Redyton, and William Hore, all claim to the lands 
in Hawstead, Whepstead, Nowton, and Brockley, which they had by virtue 
of the feoff ment of the said John - . He died without issue, when the 
manor devolved upon Alice, daughter and heir of his brother, William 
Talmach, which lady, together with her husband, William Bokenham, were 
seised of the Manor of Talmages in 1392. He was probably a member of 
the family of Bokenham, of Great Livermere, as he bore the same arms. 

In 1403 William Bokenham and Alice his wife vested their lands in 
Hawstead in Sir Walter Clopton, John de Rokewode and other trustees. 

In 1427 John Bokenham, son and heir of William and Alice, was 
seised of Talmages, otherwise Bokenham, and on his decease the manor 
descended to his younger brother of the same name, who did homage for 
his lands to the Abbot of St. Edmunds on the 2ist Jan. 1432-3. 

In 1447, by deed dated 24th Sept. 26 Hen. VI., John Bokenham the 
younger sold the reversion expectant on the decease of himself and Alice 
his wife in all his lands in Hawstead, Horningsherth, Nowton, and Whep- 
stead for 110 to John Marsehall, whose feoffee, William Colman, chaplain, 
by deed dated the last of April, 1463, conveyed the Manor of Bokenham, 
otherwise Talmages, to Roger Drury, a descendant of Nicholas, a younger 
brother of Sir Roger Drury, of Rougham. 

Roger Drury was three times married ist to Agnes; 2ndly to Felicia, 
daughter and heir of William Denston, of Besthorp, in Norfolk ; and 3rdly 
to Anna, daughter and coheir of William Hanningsfeld, of Hannmgfeld, 
in Lawshall, who afterwards married John Pagrave, of Norwich. By his 
2nd wife only he had issue, on whom he settled his property in 1481, and 
dying 30th Jan. 1495, aged 74, he was buried at Hawstead. 3 

By the settlement, which was dated I2th Sept. 1481, William Thwaytes 
confirmed to feoffees the lands of Roger Drury in Nowton, Great Hornings- 
herth, Lawshall, and Hawstead, to the use of Roger and Anna his wife 
and the survivor, for life, remainder to the uses of his will, remainder to 
Robert Drury (son of the said Roger by his late wife Felicia) and Anne 
wife of the said Robert, daughter of Sir William Calthorpe, Knt., in tail 
male, remainder successively to John Drury and Roger Drury, sons of the 
said Roger and Felicia in tail male, remainder to Katharine Strange, daughl 

' Gage, Thingoe, p. 426. 3 1-- T 3 Hen - VI1 ' 54- 

"Chart. Rolls, 25 Edw. I. 17. 



44 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of the said Roger and Felicia in tail, remainder to his right heirs. By 
his will dated at Hawstead, ^oth Jan. 1493, he did not vary his settlement 
or deal with his real estate, and the manor consequently passed to his son 
and heir, Sir Robert Drury, and from this time the manor has devolved in 
the same course as the main manor. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the fine levied by Richard 
Brabon and others against Sir Robert Drury in 1599.' 

Hawstead Place, built by the Drurys and since demolished, occupied 
the site of Talmages or Bokenhams Manor. In a survey of the manor 
in 1581 is the following general description of Hawsted Place : - 

" Willielmus Drury miles dominus hujus manerii habet in manibussuis 
scitum manerii de Boc.kenhams, in quo inhabitat, quam optime construc- 
tum, cum uno curtilagio gardino, uno le mote circumjacente, uno le traves 
ante portam messuagii predicti et unam magnam curiam undique bene 
edificatam, cum stabulis, orreis, pistrino, le Dayery howse et aliis edificiis 
necessariis et aptis pro manutencione capitalis messuagii predicti, et 
uno orto sive pomario ex parte orientali messuagii et magne curie 
predicte." 

At a court leet held gth April, 1616, after the death of Sir Robert 
Drury, another survey taken of Hawsled with Bokenhams was exhibited 
on oath ; we extract from it these particulars : 

" The scite or chief house called Hawsted Place, al. Buckenhams, a 
fair and strong built house of brick and timber, covered w lh tiles, of con- 
venient rooms ; well watered with a conduite, within a square moat ; 
necessary outhouses, courts, yards, gardens, orchards, and walcks, w h out 
the same moat, contain xj acres, worth by the yere, vj" xvs. 

" One close of pasture adjoining, called Kenolt, coii xxix a. ij p. worth 
by the yere xxvij". 

" One close of pasture, called the Hog Yard, w h a dove house there. 
coii v a. j r. xxx p. v". xs. 

" One hop yard, coii j a. iij r. and worth by yere, ij 11 . The great 
Parcke divided into sundry closes, \v h Okehill wood, xxxix a. the parrock 
ix a. xx p. beside the How wood, coii ccxcviij a. worth per an. clij". vs.'" 

Gage adds to Sir John Cullum's description of Hawstead Place that 
in 1827 he visited Hawstead and found workmen employed in pulling down 
the small part then remaining of the north side of the house, at which time 
one of the porches was standing. The door within it had a border of roses 
and carved spandrels, and an examination of the mouldings and ornaments 
gave the impression that this inner work was older than the porch, which 
seemed to be of the time of Queen Elizabeth or later. 

He ascribes the original building to Sir Robert Drury, in the time of 
Hen. VII. or Hen. VIII., he having chosen the site of Bokenhams within 
the old moat. The site, the plan, the want of elevation, and the materials 
of the house, lead him to think that it could not have been wholly rebuilt 
in the time of the Queen, for, as a manor, it was greatly inferior to Rush- 
brooke, Melford, Kentwell, Barrow, and other Suffolk houses of that time, 
and without some of their characteristic features. But as many of the 
details and embellishments of the house were in the style of the reign of 
Queen Elizabeth, it is concluded that Sir William Drury, the grandson, 

1 Fine, Easter, 41 Eliz, f Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, p. 439-440. 



HAWSTEAD. 45 

though he did not wholly rebuild the mansion, made great alterations in it. 
He is further confirmed in trie opinion above expressed by the mention 
which Sir William the grandfather makes in his will of different apartments 
in the house, but more particularly by the notes of Chitting, Chester Herald, 
on the painted glass here in the time of Jas. I., in which he draws a dis- 
tinction between the Great Chamber window and one more ancient, built, 
as he expressly says, before the other, and the fact that the one contained 
the arms of the nobility of the time of Queen Elizabeth, and the other 
the family coats of Drury, with their several impalements terminating with 
the arms of Sir William Drury's father and mother. 1 

Davy, writing 3oth July, 1840, says : "I was at Hawstead Place and 
found that the old house has been some years pulled down, and the carv- 
ings, &c., removed to Hardwick House. The moat in which the house 
stood is a very wide one, and was originally secured on both banks by brick 
work which is now fast falling away ; the site within the moat is now 
a wilderness and no remains of buildings are visible." 

Arms of BOKENHAM : Argent a fret Azure. 

FYLETS MANOR. 

" On the Urd side of the green near the highway," says Gage, " is the 
site, now occupied by a farmhouse, of the reputed manor of Fylet's, the 
moat and ramparts of which remain." 

The manor takes its name from John Fylet, who in 1358 conveyed to 
Sir William Middleton and Isabella his wife 10 acres called Godisgraine 
and two pieces of meadow called Springwell Medewe, part of lands 
acquired by him in the parish. Among the lands of John Fylet was 
Bernard's tenement held of the Manor of Hawstead. In 1364 John Fylet 
conveyed this manor to John de Rokewode, of Stanningfield, and James de 
Cordebeuf, clerk. From John 2 the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas de Rokewode, who died without issue, and was succeeded by his 
brother and heir, John de Rokewode, who in turn was succeeded by his 
son and heir, who died without issue, when the manor devolved upon his 
brother and heir, William Rokewode, and on his death passed to his widow 
Elizabeth, subsequently vesting in their son and heir, Thomas Rokewode, 
who died in 1520. John Rokewode, son and heir of Thomas, succeeded, 
and died the following year, when the manor went to his widow Elizabeth, 
and later to his son and heir, Robert Rokewode, who died in 1566, when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Robert Rokewode, on whose death 
in 1601 it went to his son and heir, Henry Rokewode, who died without 
issue, when it devolved upon his brother and heir, Ambrose Rokewode, 
executed for treason in 1605. 

In 1612 we find his widow Elizabeth lady of the manor, and later his 
son and heir, Sir Robert Rookewood, Knt., who died in 1679, from which 
time the manor passed through the Gages and Rookwoods in the same course 
as the Manor of Stanningfield, in Thedwestry Hundred. 



'Gage, Hist, of Thingoe Hund. p. 443: 2 See 



Hall, in Stoke by Nayland, in 
Babergh Hundred. 




THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HENGRA VE. 

MANOR was held here in the Confessor's time and also at 
the time of the Survey by the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and 
consisted of 3 carucates of land, 2 villeins, 2 bordars (in- 
creased to 6 at the time of the Survey), 2 ploughteams in 
demesne and 3 belonging to the men. Also 3 slaves, an acre 
of meadow, a mill, and at the time of the Survey 2 rouncies. 
Also 12 beasts, 20 hogs, 60 sheep, and 8 socmen with 60 
acres of land and a ploughteam. The abbot had sac, soc, and commenda- 
tion as to all customs over them, and they could not give or sell the land 
without his licence. There was also a church living with 30 acres of free 
land. This manor was formerly valued at 505., increased to 6os. at the 
time of the Survey. It was 6 quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in 
a gelt lorf. 1 

HENGRAVE MANOR. 

The means by which the Abbey of St. Edmund acquired this manor 
are thus recorded in the Registrum Nigrum : " Fuit etiam quidam monachus 
de Westmonasterio qui hereditatem parentum suorum Hemegreth con- 
secutus fuerat, ubi delectandi causa residebat. Cujus infamiam quidam 
monachus ^Edricus, praepositus Sancti Edmundi, cum multoties erube- 
sceret, accessit ad eum inquiens, nunquia congruum est ut vita monachi 
laicalis fiat ? hinc discede, nee amplius infra Hundredum Sancti Edmundi 
aliquam villam vendicare, nee hanc reposcere, quia Sancti Edmundi est, 
pr&sumas. Ita, monachus, alterius, austeritate pertaesus, discessit, et 
villa hactenus in possessione Sancti Edmundi permansit." 

It is not improbable that some lands in Hengrave were acquired by the 
monks under a doubtful title, for King Hen. I. confirmed to them all the 
property in Hemegreth of Peter of Amiens, and so late as the reign of 
Hen. II. cause of dispute concerning it would seem to have existed. 

Anselm, Abbot of St. Edmunds, granted to Leo and his heirs the Manor 
of " Hemegrede," to hold of the high altar of St. Edmunds of the Sacrist, 
paying yearly to the altar loos., and to the Pittancer IDS. on the fifth day 
in Easter, during the life of Talbot, the prior, and, after his death, on his 
anniversary. 1 

The grant is still preserved in the Bodleian. 3 

Leo died in the time of King Stephen or in the beginning of the follow- 
ing reign, leaving two sons, William and John. Hugh, elected Abbot of 
St. Edmunds in 1157, confirmed to William, son of Leo, the Manor of Heme- 
grede, together with lands in Westley, Chevington, and Saxham which had 
been granted to his father by Abbot Anselm. 4 

William fitz Leo was father of Thomas, surnamed De Hemegreth or 
Hemegrave, an appellation which Gage points out first occurs among the 
witnesses to a charter of Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, confirming in 
fee farm to Henry, son of Thurstan, the mill of Salmandeford and 8 acres 
of land in Hengrave formerly of William the priest. The charter was 
granted subsequently to the year 1196. 

Sir Thomas de Hemgrave was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk in 1234, 
and one of the King's Justices in Eyre in 1242. He had a grant of free 
warren here in 1231,* and subsequently the King gave him the manor and 

'Dom ii. "Bodl. Suff. Ch. 4. 

'Gage, Thingoe, p. 164, 165. 'Chart. Rolls, 15 Hen. III. 7. 

'Bodl. Suff. Ch. 2. 



HENGRAVE. 47 

the half Hundred of Mutford which had escheated to the Crown. In 1251 
Sir Thomas had the custody of the stewardship of the abbey of St. Edmunds, 
which had come to the hands of the Crown by reason of the wardship of 
Henry, son and heir of Henry de Hastings. 

He died about 1252, when a moiety of the manor passed to his widow 
Katherine in dower for life, and sublet thereto to his grandson. Sir Thomas 
de Hemegrave, son of William de Hemegrave (and Isolda his wife), who had 
died in his father's lifetime. Sir Thomas the grandson did homage for 
his grandfather's lands 4th Dec. 1252, and had issue by Beatrice his wife, 
who survived him, Sir Edmund de Hemegrave and William, parson of 
Westley, and dying in 1264 it was found by inquisition 1 taken at Hengrave 
that his capital messuage there was worth yearly 55., and the pigeon- 
house 55. ; that in demesne lands there were 300 acres, and 16 acres of 
arable land, which were worth yearly 1055. 4^. at 4^. per acre ; 16 acres 
of meadow and pasture, value 165., at I2d. per acre ; fisheries, worth yearly 
2os. ; a water mill worth 6os. ; rents of assize, 795. 4^. ; works yearly 
on an average 455. ; hens, 23^., at id. ; eggs, 220 at ^d. a score ; per- 
quisites, 55. ; that the total value of the manor was 17. 35. id. ; from which 
were to be deducted loos. 6d. payable to the Sacrist of St. Edmunds, los. 
to the Pittancer, and 2s. o%d. for other services ; that the manor was held 
of the Abbey of St. Edmund ; that to the manor belonged the advowson 
of the church of Hengrave, which was of the yearly value of ten marks ; 
and that Edmund, son of Sir Thomas, was his heir, and of the age of 10 
years. 

From other inquisitions taken at Mutford and Berningham, it appears 
that Thomas de Hemegrave died seised also of manors or lands in Westley, 
Tudenham, and Berningham, with the advowsons of Tudenham and 
Gisleham, in Suffolk ; and of lands in Seyham, in Cambridgeshire ; that 
the whole yearly value of his estate was 55. i6s. iod., from which were 
to be deducted 6. us. payable to the lords of the fee ; and that his son 
Edmund was in the custody of the wife of Robert le Noreys, at Bunewell, 
in Essex.* 

Sir Edmund de Hemegrave was in the reign of Edw. II. one of the 
assessors and collectors of the aid, and a supervisor and commissioner of 
array in Suffolk, likewise one of the conservators of the peace in the County 
of Norfolk and Suffolk, and at different times one of the Justices of Oyer 
and Terminer. 

In 1320 he was Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk and Governor of Norwich 
Castle, and in 1323 was returned to Parliament as a knight of the shire 
for Suffolk. 

He married Isabella, daughter and heir of Sir John de Mutford, one 
of the Justices of the Common Pleas, and dying in his 8oth year, Qth 
Sept. I334, 3 the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas de Hemgrave. 
He was twice married. By Isabella his ist wife he had Sir Edmund de 
Hemgrave and Beatrice, wife of Sir Robert de Thorpe, of Ashwell Thorpe, 
in Norfolk, whose descendants ultimately became the heirs general of the 
family of De Hemgrave. 

Sir Thomas de Hemegrave dying 3rd May, 1349,' was interred at the 
priory of the Blackfriars, Yarmouth. Margaret, his 2nd wife, survive) 

'I.P.M., 48 Hen. III. 21, or file 30 (17)- 3 I.P-M., 8 Edw. III. 56. 
Gage, Thingoe, p. 168, 169. "I.P.M., 23 Edw. III. 166. 



48 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

him. Sir Edmund de Hemgrave the son represented Norfolk and Suffolk 
in Parliament in 1372, and in the following year had with other persons 
the custody of the shores of Suffolk. 

By deed dated at Tudenham on the Saturday next after the feast of 
the Translation of St. Thomas the Martyr, in 1352, this Sir Edmund con- 
veyed to Richard de Brews, Thomas de Shardelowe, Edmund de Thorpe, 
Knights, and other trustees, his manors of Hemegrave, Tudenham, Westle, 
and Burnham. He married 1st Joan, cousin and heir of James de Cokefeld, 
and 2ndly Alice, daughter of John de Insula. By his ist marriage there 
were two sons, Sir Edmund de Hemgrave, the younger, and Sir Thomas <!< 
Hemegrave. His will bears date the vigil of St. Lawrence the Martyr, 1379, 
being the day before his decease. He desired that his body should be 
interred in the church of the Augustine friars at Norwich, and gave certain 
furniture and effects belonging to his house in Melford to Alice his wife, 
appointing her and Sir Edmund Thorpe, Richard Wychingham and other 
persons executors. 

Dame Alice his widow became the wife of Sir Richard Wychingham, 
of Wychingham, in Norfolk. Sir Edmund de Hemgrave the younger 
having died in 1374, in the lifetime of his father without issue, the manor 
passed to the 2nd son, Sir Thomas de Hemegrave, who married first 
Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Herling, of Herling, in Norfolk, by 
Margery, daughter of Sir Thomas Jenny. 

In 1394 a fine was levied of the manor and also of the advowson by 
Edward Hunt, parson of the church of Codenham, against Sir Thomas 
Hengrave, Knt., and Elizabeth his wife. 1 

Elizabeth de Henegrave died in 1402, and was buried in the church of 
the Augustine friars at Thetford. Sir Thomas married 2ndly in 1408 Joan 
Ponde. 

By the ist marriage there was issue a son Edmund, on whom his father, 
by deed, dated at Snailwell the Monday before the feast of St. Faith the 
Virgin, in the 3rd year of Hen. V. [6th Oct. 1416] entailed the manor and 
half Hundred of Mutford. Upon the death of this son shortly afterward, 
in 1411, without issue, Sir Thomas de Hemegrave vested his estates in 
trustees for sale, the produce to be applied for pious uses. Thus the Manor 
of Hengrave, under a fine levied by him and Joan his wife, in 1411, and by 
virtue of deeds dated i8th and 20th January, 1417, became limited to Sir 
Thomas de Hemegrave and Joan his wife for their lives, and after the decease 
of the survivor to Sir Simon Felbrigge, Robert Mauteby, William Gurney, 
Robert Sherlocke, John Bacon, John Wilby, Peter Shelton, and William 
Paston, of Paston, and their heirs. These trustees immediately sold the 
reversion of the manor for the sum of 233. 6s. Sd. to Edmund Winter, of 
Berningham Winter, in Norfolk ; and by deed dated 28th January in the 
same year the manor was conveyed to John Wodehouse, Roger Flore, 
William Rokewode, and other feoffees, in trust for Edmund Winter." Sir 
Thomas de Hemegrave died I7th Oct. 1419. 

Edmund Winter and his feoffees, by an indenture dated 5th April, 
1421, granted the reversion of the manor expectant on the decease of Joan 
de Hemegrave to Sir Roger Drury, Thomas Geddyng, Richard Hethe and 
other persons in trust for Thomas Hethe. 1 Joan had remarried Richard 

1 Feet of Fines, 18 Rich. II. 9. 'See Manor of Saxham Hall Parva, in this 

'Gage's Thingoe, p. 174. Hundred. 



HENGRAVE. 4g 

Vewetre, and this same year a fine was levied of the manor by William 
Paston Philip Caxton, Robert Wilby, and John Darnue against the said 
Richard Vewetre and Joan his wife. 1 

,,rM,. Thomas Hethe died in J 439> leaving an only child Elizabeth, wife of 
William Berdewell, of Bardwell. 

Thomas Hethe made a disposition of his real estate by a deed poll 
bearing date soth Oct. 1439, in which he recites his late purchase of the 
Manor of Hengrave, and that he had therewith enfeoffed himself and John 
Enderby, Thomas Geddyng, and others to fulfil his will. 

The testator directed that his several trustees should, after his decease, 
enfeoff with his said hereditaments Anne his wife for her life, she paying 
out of Little Saxham to his daughter, Elizabeth Berdewell, and the heirs 
of her body, 10 yearly ; that his said trustees after the decease of Anne 
should enfeoff Hugh Bokenham and John Ledar, and their heirs in trust, 
that if Anne his wife, who was supposed to be with child, should have a 
son, then Hugh Bokenham and John Ledar should enfeoff such son on his 
attaining 21 years ; but if Anne should die without a son by him, that they 
should enfeoff his daughter Elizabeth for her life, and that if his daughter 
Elizabeth, who was also then with child, should have a son by William 
Berdewell her husband, they should enfeoff such son on his attaining 21 
years, in fee tail ; but if Anne or Elizabeth should die without issue male, 
or such issue should fail, he directed that Hugh Bokenham and John Ledar 
should sell his manor and lands, and apply the money for the benefit of 
his soul and the souls of his wife, children, and benefactors, and the souls 
of the faithful departed, in support of priests and the poor, and in other 
pious uses as it should seem best for the benefit of their souls, and that the 
rest of his lands not therein comprised should go to his right heirs. 2 

Elizabeth, the only daughter of Thomas Hethe, had issue by William 
Berdewell, who died in 1440, an only child Margaret, wife of John Harleston, 
of Harleston, in Suffolk. Thus there being no male issue of Thomas Hethe 
or of Elizabeth Berdewell, the trust for sale created by his will came into 
operation, and the Manor of Hengrave was sold to the Stafford family. 

By deed dated 3ist March, 1441, John Enderby and Thomas Geddyng, 
the surviving feoffees of the Manor of Hengrave, granted the reversion 
expectant on the decease of Anne Hethe and Elizabeth Berdewell, to 
Humphrey, then Earl, and afterward Duke, of Buckingham, Henry Drury, 
John Harper, of Russel, and Robert Whitgreave, of Stafford, in fee ; and 
by a deed poll of the same date Anne Hethe acknowledged to have received 
from the Earl, by the hands of Thomas Heigham, 55 marks in virtue of a 
bargain between the Earl and herself concerning the reversion of this manor, 
and also of Luce's Hall, and of tenements called Master Nicholl's and Sir 
Thomas's, which sale Elizabeth Berdewell confirmed by deed dated ist 
April in the same year. 

On the marriage of Sir Harry Stafford, 3rd son of the Duke of Bucking- 
ham, with Margaret, Countess of Richmond, mother of King Hen. VII., 
the Duke, among other estates, settled upon them the manors of Hengrave 
and Westley. Sir Harry, by his will dated 2nd Oct. 1481, directed that 
his body should be buried at the College of Pleshey, in Essex, and he died 
shortly afterward without issue. In depositions taken in the reign of 
Hen. VIII. in a cause in Chancery, the Duke of Buckingham against Lucas, 

1 Feet of Fines, 9 Hen. V. 51. "Gage, Thingoe Hundred, p. 179. 

G 



50 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

it was alleged : " That my Ladye, the Kyng's grandmoder, by reason of 
a jointure, was peaceably seised of the Manor of Hengrave." Margaret, 
Countess of Richmond, died 2oth June, 1509. 

Humphrey, the Duke's eldest son, being slain in the lifetime of his 
father, at the battle of St. Albans, in 1455, left issue Henry, Duke of 
Buckingham, Knight of the Garter, heir of his grandfather. On the death 
of Sir Harry Stafford the reversion of the Manor of Hengrave devolved on 
this powerful nobleman, who, it is well known, was the principal agent in 
placing the Crown on King Richard's head. By deed dated 26th February, 
1480, Duke Henry conveyed the manor to Thomas, Archbishop of Canter- 
bury, Thomas, Archbishop of York, Henry, Earl of Essex, William Knyvet, 
Knt., and other trustees. 

Upon the attainder of Henry, Duke of Buckingham, in 1483, King 
Richard granted the manor to Henry, Lord Grey, of Codnor, in tail male/ 
whose possession of it was, however, very short, for on the accession of 
Hen. VII. to the throne that monarch restored Edward, Duke of Bucking- 
ham, son and heir of Duke Henry, to his father's honours and estates. 

In 1521 Sir Thomas Kytson contracted with the Duke of Buckingham 
for the purchase of the Manor of Hengrave, and also of the Manor of Colston 
Bassett, in the County of Nottingham, at the sum of 2,340, and these 
estates were conveyed to him by bargain and sale, dated 2Oth May, 1520, 
being warranted by the Duke to be of the yearly value of 115. In 1522 
the unfortunate Edward, Duke of Buckingham, was attainted of high 
treason, and died upon the scaffold. Sir Thomas Kytson was the son of 
Robert Kytson, of Warten, in the County Palatine of Lancaster. 

After the attainder of Edward, Duke of Buckingham, Sir Thomas 
Kytson was disturbed in the possession of his newly-acquired manors of 
Hengrave and Colston Bassett. The King's avarice had procured the 
overt act of treason to be dated from the 4th year of his reign, and upon a 
commission it was found that the Duke was then seised of those manors. 
Sir Thomas Kytson was in consequence deprived of them for a time. The 
vesting of estates in trustees was a measure generally resorted to by the 
policy of the times as a protection from forfeiture, and Sir Thomas Kytson 
sheltered himself under a deed executed by Henry, the grandfather of 
Edward, Duke of Buckingham, by virtue of -which the legal estate in the 
manors was vested at the time of the attainder in the surviving feoffee, 
Sir William Knyvet. 4 

Sir Thomas Kytson having presented his memorial to the King was 
restored to the estates which he had bought of the Duke of Buckingham, 
and the same were confirmed to him by an Act of Parliament passed in the 
I5th year of His Majesty's reign. 

Of Sir Thomas Kytson Mr. Gage says : " His mercantile transactions 
were very extensive, and particularly at the cloth fairs or staples holden at 
Antwerp, Middleburg, and other places in Flanders, by the Merchant 
Adventurers. He was sheriff of London in 1533, previously to which he 
had been knighted. His importance in the city may be inferred from the 
minute relating to the seizure of Hengrave by the Crown, in which he 
intimates that the heavy impost on the citizens had been imputed to his 

'Pat. Rolls, i Rich. III. pt. iv. 17. This 'Gage's Thingoe, p. 180-181. 
grant also included the Manors of 
Haverhill and Hersham, of the 
yearly value c f 44 and 28. 



HENGRAVE. 5I 

influence. In the same document he notices the large contributions by 
himself. The mansion of Hengrave, which will be presently described, 
is a monument of his magnificence. He purchased considerable estates 
in the counties of Devon, Dorset, Somerset, and Nottingham, and the 
dissolution of the abbey of St. Edmund gave him an opportunity of largely 
extending his domain in Suffolk, he having already added Felton's in Barrow 
to his purchase of Hengrave. By letters patent dated at Walden 25th 
March of 31 Hen. VIII. the several manors of Risby, Sextens, otherwise 
Westley, Chevington, Hargrave, Fornham All Saints, Fornham St. Gene- 
vie ve, Fornham St. Martin, with the advowsons of those parishes, also the 
lordship of Downham, the priory in Fornham St. Genevieve, with certain 
closes there called Fresnels,Le Camping Close, and the Slade, the abbot's water 
mill, the ox pastures in Great Barton, and the rents, fines, and customary 
work in the manor and parish of Hengrave, were granted to Sir Thomas 
Kytson and Margaret his wife, and his heirs. The property in Suffolk thus 
acquired, partly in lease for long terms of years, was of the yearly value of 
202. 45., and the consideration expressed in the grant was the sum of 
3,710. is. 8d. Loans are said to have been negociated by Sir Thomas 
Kytson with the Crown, and to these transactions the large grant of abbey 
lands in Suffolk has been attributed. This inference does not appear to be 
correct : the sum of 2,000 was paid down on the issuing of the letters 
patent, and the remainder of the price was secured by the bond of Sir 
Thomas Kytson and his son-in-law, John Croftes, of Westow, to be paid 
on the ist October ensuing ; before which time Sir Thomas having died, 
his administratrix discharged the debt out of his personal estate." 1 

A fine was levied of the manor by Sir Thomas Kytson, and others in 
1520 against Edward, Duke of Buckingham, and Alianora his wife. 2 

By his ist wife Sir Thomas Kytson had issue, Elizabeth, wife of 
Edmund Croftes, of Westow. By his 2nd wife Margaret, only daughter of 
John Donnington, of Stoke Newington, in Middlesex, by Elizabeth his wife, 
daughter and heir of Pye, he had a posthumous son, Sir Thomas Kytson, 
and four daughters (i) Katharine, wife of Sir John Spencer, of Worm- 
leighton, co. Warwick; (2) Dorothy, wife ist of Sir Thomas Packington, 
of Aylesbury, in Buckinghamshire, and Hampton Lovett, in Worcestershire, 
and 2ndly of Thomas Tasburgh, of Hawridge, in Buckinghamshire ; (3) 
Frances, wife ist of John, Lord Fitzwarren, eldest son of John, Lord Bourchier, 
Earl of Bath, and afterwards of William Barnabel, of Great Saxham ; 
(4) Anne, wife of Sir William Spring, of Pakenham, High Sheriff of the 
county in 1578. Sir Thomas Kytson died nth Sept. 1540, aged 55 years. 
On the step in front of his tomb in Hengrave church is placed a recumbent 
figure of Sir Thomas in armour ; he has a round head of hair and smooth 
chin ; his feet rest against a unicorn's head couped. The frieze of the tomb 
has these lines : 

Here lyethe Sir Thomas Kytson, Knight, who first married 

the Daughter of 

by whom he had issue one Daughter named Elizabeth ; next 
he married Margaret, the Daughter and heyer of John Don- 
nington, Esquire, and, by her, had issue Sir Thomas Kytson, 
Knight, Katherin, Dorythy, Francys, and Anne, as in their 
several scutchons apperethe ; and departed thys lyf e ye xith 
of September, Anno Domini m.d.xl. aetatis Iv. 

'Thingoe Hundred, p. 182, 183. "Fine, Easter, 12 Hen. VIII. 



52 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In the front of the tomb are carved three escutcheons ; the centre one 
displays the arms and crest of Sir Thomas Kytson. On the dexter 
shield are his arms impaling those of Margaret, his 2nd wife Donninglon, 
quartering Pye. On the sinister shield are the arms of Sir Thomas Kytson, 
the son, and Jane, his ist wife Kytson quarterly with Donnington, impaling 
Paget. On the east side are the arms of Sir Thomas Kytson the son, and 
Elizabeth, his 2nd wife Kytson impaling Cornwallis quarterly, viz., ist 
Cornwall's, 2nd Bucton, yd Braham, 4th Teye, 5th Tyrell, 6th Stamford, 
7th Sable, crusily of crosslets, a lion rampant Argent, 8th Sable, a chevron 
between 3 standing cups covered Argent Butler, gth Sable, fretty and a 
chief Argent, on the chief a lion passant regardant of the field Mapershatt. 
On the west side of the tomb in an ornamental panel is the coat of Kytson, 
impaling Argent on a fesse Azure, between 3 fleurs-de-lis of the second, 
as many trefoils slipped Or. These arms probably belong to the elder 
Sir Thomas Kytson's ist wife, whose name does not appear on the monu- 
ment. On the frieze at the same end of the tomb are the escutcheons of 
Sir Thomas Kytson's daughters, with the names of their husbands and 
themselves, viz., ist Croftes impaling Kytson ; 2nd Argent a fesse between 
6 sea-mews' heads erased Gules Spencer, of Wormleighton, impaling Kytson; 
3rd Party per chevron Sable and Argent, in chief 3 mullets Or, in base as 
many garbs Gules Packington impaling Kytson ; 4th Bourchier, quarterly 
as before impaling Kytson ; 5th Argent, on a chevron between three 
mascles Gules, as many cinquefoils Or Spring impaling Kytson. 

The canopy of the monument is flat, and has on its summit a square- 
panelled shrine, the front of which displays the shield of the Earl of Bath, 
with supporters and motto, and the arms of Bourchier quarterly, impaling 
Donnington quarterly. On the west side of the shrine is the shield of 
Sir Richard Long, his arms quarterly, impaling Donnington. Underneath 
is written : "Sir Richard Longe and ye Lady Kytson." At the angles of 
the canopy are figures of naked boys holding escutcheons ; two of them 
bear the arms of the Earl's daughters, by Margaret, his countess, viz., 
Bourchier, with a blank impalement, subscribed : " Susan Bourchier " ; 
and Gules, a chevron Argent, between 3 mullets pierced Or, Pryce impaling 
Bourchier, subscribed : " Pryce and Bridget." On a third shield are the 
arms of the Earl of Bath and Eleanor his wife, viz., Bourchier quarterly 
as before, impaling Manners, as follows : Quarterly, ist Or, two bars Azure, 
a chief quarterly of the second and Gules, the first and fourth quarter 
charged with two fleurs-de-lis of the field, in the second and third a lion of 
England Manners ; 2nd Gules, three water-bougets Argent Roos ; 3rd 
Gules, three Catharine wheels Argent Espee ; 4th Azure, a Catharine 
wheel Argent Trusbut ; underneath is written : ' The Earle of Bathon 
and Eleanor Manners." A 4th shield, between the two last, larger than 
the rest, and surmounted by a knight's helmet, crested by a Saracen's 
head, displays the arms of Bourchier quarterly as before. 1 

Upon the 2ist September, 1540, allegations were taken to prove Sir 
Thomas Kytson's nuncupative will. John Croftes, of Weston, Edmund 
Croftes, of Lincoln's Inn, and others, deposed that on Saturday, nth 
September, Sir Thomas Kytson being sick and lying within his Manor of 
Hengrave, about eight of the clock at night, Henry Payne, in the presence 
of the deponents, asked him, then lying in his bed, if he had any will made ; 
to whom he answered " No," and that then the said Payne, speaking 

'Howard's Visit, of Suffolk, vol. ii. 90. 



HENGRAVE. 



53 



again, said : " For ye have told me in times past that my lady your wife 
should have this Manor of Hengrave " ; and that the said Sir Thomas 
Kytson answered and said : ' Yea, marry shall she," and that then the 
said Payne, speaking again, said " And Felton's, too ? " " Yea," answered 
Sir Thomas Kytson, " and Felton's, too " ; that the substance of this 
conversation was immediately set down in writing, in the form of a will, 
by Henry Payne, at the request of Sir Thomas Kytson, in his presence and 
in that of the deponents, and that Sir Thomas Kytson lived four hours 
after the conversation. 1 

Margaret, widow of Sir Thomas Kytson, became wife of Sir Richard 
Long and subsequently of John Bourchier, Earl of Bath. She died aoth 
Dec. 1561. Sir Thomas Kytson the son succeeded to the lordship of the 
manor, and being a ward of the King the wardship was granted by the Crown 
to the Lord Chancellor Rich and afterwards to the Countess of Bath. In 
1575 a fine of the manor was levied by Edward Sulyard and others against 
Thomas Kytson. 8 

In 1578 Hengrave was visited by Queen Elizabeth, and her visit is 
thus referred to by Churchyard : " There were," he says, " 200 young 
gentlemen, clad all in white velvet, and 300 of the graver sorte, apparelled 
in black velvet coates and fair chaynes, all ready at one instant and place, 
with 1,500 serving- men more, on horseback, well and bravely mounted, in 
good order, ready to receive the Queen's Highness into Suffolk, which 
surely was a comely troope, and a noble sight to behold. And all these 
waited on the sheriff, Sir William Spring, during the Queen's Majesties 
abode in those parties, and to the very confines of Suffolke ; but, before her 
Highness passed into Norfolke, there was in Suffolke such sumptuous 
feasting and bankets as seldom in any part of the world hath been seen 
before. The Maister of the Rolls, Sir William Cordell, was one of the firste 
that begaine this great feasting, and did light such a candle to the rest of 
the shire that many were glad bountifully and franckly to follow the same 
example, with such charges and costs, as the whole traine were in some 
sorte pleased therewith. And neare Bury, Sir William Drury for his part, 
at his house, made the Queen's Highnesse a costly and delicat dinner ; and 
Sir Robert Jermyn of Rooshbroke feasted the French embassadoures two 
several times ; with which charges and courtesie they stood marvellously 
contented. The Sheriffe, Sir William Spring, Sir Thomas Kytson, Sir 
Arthur Higham, and divers others of worship, kept great houses, and sundry, 
either at the Queen's coming or return, solemnly feasted her Highness, yea, 
and defrayed the whole charges, for a day or twayne ; presented gifts, 
made such triumphes and devices, as indede was most noble to beholde, 
and very thankfully accepted." 

The owner of Hengrave was knighted by her majesty, and a walk 
leading from the park to the Hyde Wood, and marked out by old thorn 
bushes was, in 1838, when Gage wrote, still called " Queen Elizabeth's 
Walk," and at the hall the Queen's chamber was long remembered. 3 

In 1587 Sir Thomas Kytson had licence to impark 300 acres of land in 
Hengrave, Fornham All Saints, Risby, Flempton and Lackford, and had a 
grant of free warren and several fishery therein, and all other privileges 
annexed to a park. 4 The enclosure then made was called " The Great 

'Gage's Thingoe, p. 185. 3 Gag;e, Thingoe, p. 189. 

"Fine, Mich. 17-18 Eliz. 4 Pat. Rolls, 29 Eliz. pars. 14, I7th Oct. 



54 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Park " to distinguish it from the " Little Park," a more ancient enclosure. 
In 1712 the extent of the whole was 500 acres. 

Sir Thomas Kytson the son was twice married. His 1st wife, by whom 
he had no issue, was Jane, daughter of William, Lord Paget, K.G., Lord 
Privy Seal ; his 2nd wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Cornwallis, 
of Brome, Treasurer of Calais, and Comptroller of the Household of Queen 
Mary. By her he had issue a son, John Kytson, born 8th June, 1562, who 
died an infant, and two daughters, Margaret, wife of Sir Charles Cavendish, 
of Welbeck Abbey, in Nottinghamshire, brother of William, Earl of 
Devonshire, which lady died shortly after her marriage, without issue, 
and Mary, wife of Thomas Darcy, Lord Baron Darcy, of Ch'ich, created 
3rd July, 19 Jas. I. Viscount Colchester, and 4th Nov. 2 Chas. I., Earl of 
Rivers. 

By a settlement dated igth May, 1582, Hengrave, with the bulk of 
the Kytson property, was settled, after the death of Sir Thomas Kytson 
and Elizabeth his wife, and failure of male issue, upon Sir Charles Cavendish 
and Margaret his wife, in special tail, and in default of issue upon her sister Mary 
in tail. Sir Charles Cavendish died in 1617 in the lifetime of Lady 
Kytson. 

Sir Thomas Kytson the son died 28th Jan. 1602, and was buried at 
Hengrave 2nd March following, and in the chancel of the church there, 
against the south wall, is a tomb corresponding much in form and size with 
his father's monument, though, perhaps, more elegant. The recumbent 
effigies of himself in armour and of his two wives, each in the habit of the 
times, with large ruffs and cockle-shell hats, are placed beneath a canopy 
supported by Corinthian pillars. At his feet is a unicorn's head ; at those 
of his 2nd wife a white hart couchant, wreathed about the neck with oak, 
and vulned in the shoulder. On the front of the tomb are carved two 
escutcheons, the one having the arms of Kytson impaling Paget ; the other 
those of Kytson impaling Cornwallis. On the west side of the tomb are 
two female figures kneeling, and on the entablature above are the escut- 
cheons of Sir Thomas Kytson's two daughters, one bearing the arms of 
Cavendish quarterly impaling Kytson ; the other those of Darcy impaling 
Kytson. On the summit of the canopy a highly-ornamented shield displays 
the arms and crest of Kytson. On the frieze of the monument is written : - 

Here lyeth the body of Sir Thomas Kytson 

Knight, first married to Jane, one of the 
daughters of ye Lord Pagett, who dying without 

yssue, he next married Elizabeth, 

ye eldest daughter of Sir Thomas Cornwalleis, 

Knight, by whom he had one sonne, 

that died in his infancie, 
and two daughters, Margaret and Mary ; ye 
first married to Sir Charles Cavendish, Knight ; 

the other to the Lord Darcie of Chich. 
He departed this life ye xxviij th. of January 
m.d.c.i.j, and in the year of his age Ixiij. 

This monument was erected at ye 

charge of Dame Elizabeth Kytson, in memory of her beloved husband, 
Septr. xxth. m.d.c.viij. 



HENGRAVE. 



55 



On the entablature of the tomb appear three sentences : 



Utinam amatores fuissemus 
vitae permanentis, sicut sumus 
vitae fugientis. 



Saeculum est quasi mare, 
qui amat Deum ambulat 
super mare. 1 



Elizabeth, Lady Kytson, who survived her husband and became 
possessor of Hengrave for her life, died 2nd Aug. 1628, having by her will 
dated the 6th June preceding 2 ordered her body to be buried without pomp 
early in the morning or in the evening in the tomb built for her in Hengrave 
church, and decreeing that the furniture at Hengrave Hall and the armour, 
music, and musical instruments should descend as heirlooms to the persons 
for the time being entitled to the house. On the decease of Lady Kytson, 
Hengrave passed to Thomas, Lord Darcy, of Chich, Viscount Colchester 
and Earl Rivers (son of John, Lord Darcy, who was son of Thomas, ist 
Lord Darcy, of Chich, K.G.), in right of Mary his wife, sole surviving child 
of Sir Thomas Kytson the son. 

The Earl died 2ist Feb. 1639,' having had issue a son Thomas and four 
daughters. The son, however, had died in 1614, in his father's lifetime, 
leaving by Mary his wife, daughter and heir of Sir John Fitz, of Fitzford, 
in Devonshire, and widow of Sir Alan Percy, K.B., younger son of Henry, 
8th Earl of Northumberland, no issue. 

Attached to the united piers of the chapel and chancel arches of Hen- 
grave church is a monument of alabaster and coloured marble, consisting 
of an arch beneath a canopy supported by two Corinthian columns. It 
contains the effigy of Thomas, only son of Thomas, Lord Darcy, of Chich, 
afterwards Earl Rivers, in a kneeling posture. He is habited in a doublet, 
with the flat ruff, trunk hose, and buskins, having his sword by his side, a 
helmet plumed, and a book on a desk before him, his gauntlets and pistols 
suspended behind him, upon his arm a shield, bearing the arms of Darcy, 
quarterly. In the spandrels are two escutcheons, the one with the arms 
of Darcy, impaling Kytson ; the other Darcy quarterly with Kytson, im- 
impaling, ist and 4th Agrent, gutte de sang, a cross ingrailed Gules, Fitz ; 
2nd Sable, three battle-axes Argent, Denys ; 3rd Sable, three fleurs-de-lis, 
Argent, Curteys of Pyll. On the canopy between two small obelisks, 
is a semi-circular pediment, out of the centre of which rises a shaft, bearing 
an hourglass and a shield, with the arms of Darcy, supported on the dexter 
side by a roebuck rampant Ermine, and on the sinister by a goat Argent ; 
crest : a woman with golden tresses, clothed in a purple robe fastened by 
a brooch close round the throat, holding in her right hand a slip of cinquefoil. 
A female figure reclines on each side of the pediment. At the base of the 
monument is an inscription on two tablets of black marble, and under those 



'Howard's Visit, of Suff. vol. ii. 90, 91. 
Sir Thomas Kytson the son's will 
was dated 25th June, 1601, and 
proved in London, I3th Feb. 1602. 



'Proved 24th Nov. 1628. 
3 His will dated I4th March, 1635, was 
proved 25th Feb. 1639. 



56 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

upon a medallion, a skeleton in a winding-sheet. The inscription is as 
follows : 

MEMORISE SACRUM 

Of Thomas Darcy here the body ly, 
Onely heire masle of f.hiche's Barony, 
By Mary heire of Kitson's family, 
The true bred hope of all his progeny ; 
Trayn'd up in youth so well by Virtue's lore, 
That he the second prize at Barri'rs bore,' 
By High Prince Henrye's brave election, 
Pickt out by Virtue's owne direction, 
And thereto led by Honor as his page, 
As then but two and twenty years of age, 
With D'enshire Fitze's heire he wedded was, 
But she from earth him issuless let pass, 
To heaven, to make a better marriage, 
I'th' twenty sixt yeare of his youthful age, 
His fame in spight of death shall never dy, 
But live in honor to eternity. 
Ex sumptib. Dominae Elizabethae Kytson 
aviae ejus.* 

Mary, Countess of Rivers, by her will dated 7th May, 1644, to which 
were annexed several codicils, requested to be interred near her daughter, 
Susan Darcy, in the church of Holy Trinity, at Colchester, desiring that her 
body should be borne to the grave by four poor persons of the parish ; that 
no sermon should be preached at her funeral; that there should be no 
eating and drinking, usual on such occasions ; and that no mourning 
should be given for her ; bequeathing to the poor of the parish 20. The 
testatrix confirmed all deeds of appointment and settlements executed 
by her of her real estates, and directed her executors to pay the legacies 
specified in the schedule in her hand-writing, and to give the sums of money 
which she had tied up in little bags to the several persons whose names 
were labelled upon them ; and after various specific bequests she gave 
the residue of her personal estate to Sir Harbottle Grimston and Sir Thomas 
Honeywood, appointing them her executors. This will was made the 
subject of investigation by the Commissioners for Sequestrations. The 
remains of Lady Rivers, who died in 1644, were deposited in a vault in 
Trinity churchyard, Colchester. Morant notices that a pyramid over her 
grave had been demolished. 

Upon her daughter Penelope, the Countess, in 1643, settled Hengrave 
and her Suffolk property. Mr. Gage informs us that Sir George Trenchard, 
Sir John Gage, and Sir William Hervey, each solicited Lady Penelope in 
marriage at the same time, and that, to keep peace between the rivals, 
she threatened the first aggressor with her perpetual displeasure, 
humorously telling them that, if they would wait, she would have them all 
in their turns a promise which was actually performed. The gentleman 
first favoured by her was Sir George Trenchard, of Wolverton, in Dorset- 
shire, who dying shortly after the marriage without issue, she married Sir 

'This refers to a very magnificent tilting 1610, at Whitehall. The Earl of 

match prepared for the entertain- Montgomery obtained the first prize, 

ment of Prince Kenry, 6th Jan. 'Howard's Visit, of Suff. vol. ii. 91. 



HENGRAVE. 



57 



John Gage, of Firle, in Sussex. She with her 3rd husband, Sir William 
Hervey, of Ickworth, in 1650, begged allowance of their claim. 1 

Sir John Gage, of Firle, the 2nd husband of Lady Penelope, was created 
a baronet 26th March, 1622. He died 3rd Oct. 1633, and his widow, in 
1642, remarried Sir William Hervey, of Ickworth. 

By deed poll under the hands and seals of Sir William Hervey and 
Lady Penelope his wife, dated ist June, 1647, reciting that by virtue of a fine 
levied in Trinity term, and certain conveyances and assurances executed 
by them, Hengrave and other manors in Suffolk were vested in John Hervey, 
Henry North, Richard Gipps, John Covel, and Fitznun Lambe in trust 
to convey the same to such persons as Lady Penelope should appoint. She 
directed her trustees to stand seised in trust after her decease, and subject 
to certain provisions for her sons, John Gage and Henry Gage, to uses for 
the benefit of her 3rd son, Edward Gage, and his issue male. 2 

Sir William Hervey died 3Oth Sept. 1660, in the lifetime of Lady 
Penelope, without issue by her. This lady's will is dated 3oth August, 1656, 
and was proved in London 2nd July, 1661. She desired to be privately 
interred in the chancel of Hengrave church, as near to her daughter Dorothy 
as conveniently might be. She ratified and confirmed assurances which, 
her will states, she had made in favour of her son, Edward Gage, and his 
issue male, of all her manors and hereditaments in the County of Suffolk, 
except the manors of Lackford and Fornham Saint Martin, which she had 
settled upon her eldest son, Sir Thomas Gage, deceased, adding the following 
declaration : " And for full satisfaction of all that shall desire to know my 
reason why I have so settled and assured them, and do settle the same, I 
do declare I have done the same of my own accord, upon a full and settled 
purpose, upon long and serious deliberation, not in respect of any justice 
given me by, or displeasure taken against, any of my other children, all of 
whom I do acknowledge dearly to esteem and love ; but, knowing and con- 
sidering that my eldest son was plentifully provided for by having his late 
father's estate and inheritance heretofore settled upon him, of a competent 
and considerable value, and having made convenient provisions for main- 
tenance of my other two sons, John and Henry, an earnest desire to raise 
another branch of my family hath moved me to settle and assure my 
manors and hereditaments upon my said son Edward, whereat I desire 
my other sons to be no ways displeased with their said brother Edward, 
this being done without any solicitation of his." 3 

The manor accordingly, after his mother's death in 1661, passed to 
Sir Edward Gage, 4 who was created a baronet by King Chas. II. i5th 
July, 1662, and the warrant for the creation will be found amongst the 
State Papers. 5 

Sir Edward Gage was five times married ist in 1648 to Mary, 
daughter of Sir William Hervey, of Ickworth ; 2ndly, to Frances, 2nd 
daughter of Walter, 2nd Lord Aston, of Forfar ; 3rdly, to Anne Watkins ; 
4thly, to Lady Frances Fielding, 2nd daughter of George Fielding, ist Earl 
of Desmond, K.B., a younger son of William, ist Earl Denbigh, by Susan, 
sister of George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham ; and Sthly, to Bridget 
Fielding, also of the Denbigh family, widow of Slaughter. Sir Edward 



'S.P. 1650, Cal. of Comp. 2381. 
* Gage's Thingoe, p. 206. 
3 Ibid, p. 207. 



4 For some notes on the early members of 

the Gage family, see Notes and 
Queries, loth ser. viii. 41 (28th 
Sept. 1907). 

5 S.P. 1662, 369. 



58 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Gage attained his goth year, and was buried 8th Jan. 1706-7,' when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Sir William Gage, who married twice 
ist in 1675, Mary Charlotte, only daughter of Sir Thomas Bond, of Peckham, 
co. Surrey, Bart., Comptroller of the Household to the Queen mother 
Henrietta ; and 2ndly, Merelina, 5th daughter and coheir of Thomas, 2nd 
Lord Jermyn, niece and coheir of Henry, Earl of St. Albans, and Henry, 
Lord Dover, and widow of Sir Thomas Spring, 3rd Bart., of Pakenham. 

Sir William Gage died 8th Feb. 1727, in his 7ist year," and the manor 
passed to his grandson and heir, Sir Thomas Gage, son of Thomas Gage 
(by Delariviere, eldest daughter and coheir of Sir Symonds D'Ewes, 3rd 
Bart., of Stow Hall), who had died ist March, 1716, aged 32, in his father's 
lifetime. Sir Thomas Gage, 3rd Bart., the grandson, died ist Sept. 1741, 
a bachelor/ and was buried at Hengrave, where against the east wall is 
a monument ot white marble supporting a finely-sculptured bust, and 
inscribed as follows : 

MS. 
THOMAE GAGE, BARONETTI, 

FILII NATU MAXIMI THOMAE GAGE, DE HENGRAVE, ARMIGERI, 
ET DELARIVIERE FILIJE PRIMOGENITVE ET COH^REDIS SYMONDSII 
D'EWES DE STOWE HALL, BARONETTI, EX CONJUGE SUA DELARIVIERA 
JERMYN, FILIA ET COH^REDE DOMINI THOMAE JERMYN, BARONIS 
BURGI SCI. EDMUNDI, AC ETIAM COH.EREDE D. D. HENRICI 
JERMYN, COMITIS SCI ALBANI, ET HENRICI JERMYN, BARONIS 

DOVERLE. 

QUI 

PRATER MULTAS QUIBUS ENITUIT VIRTUTES 
DIGNAS: QUAE IN MARMORE EXARENTUR. 

ERAT 

EXIMIO ANIMI CANDORE 
INCREDIBILI MORUM SUAVITATE 

PR^DITUS. 

AVIT^E RELIGIONIS TENAX 
SUMMO IN DEUM CULTU, 
MUNIFICA IN PANPERES BENEFICENTIA 
MIRA IN OMNES HUMANITATE ET <EQUITATE 

SPECTABILIS. 

NEC NON 

PATRE VITA FUNCTO, 
OB SINGULAREM IN MATREM PIETATEM 
PATERNUM IN FRATRES NATU MINORES ANIMUM 
QUORUM COMMODO PARITER AC HONORI 
MAGNOPERE CONSULUIT, 
MULTUM INSIGNIS. 

OBIIT CCELEBS DIE i SEPTEMBRIS ANNO DOMINI MDCCXLI. 
ETATIS XXIX ET HIC JACET IN EODEM SEPULTUS TUMULO CUM 
AVO SUO GULIELMO GAGE BARONETTO, VIRO PRESTANTISSIMO 
QUI SEPTUAGENARIO MAJOR DIEM CLAUSIT EXTREMUM 

VIII. FEB. MDCCXXVII. 

R.I.P. 

HOC FILIO CHARISSIMO, NON, SPLENDORIS, SED INGENTIS 
AMORIS, MONUMENTUM, DELARIVIERA RBMIXA 
LECTISSIMA, EADEM QUE MATER AMANTISSIMA 

MOERENS 

PONI VOLUIT, 

MDCCXLII. 

'His will is dated 8th June 1706, proved J His will is dated 3ist Aug. 1741, and it 
2.3rd Jan. 1707. was proved i6th Jan. following. 

'His will is dated 2nd May 1715, and it 
was proved 23rd June, 1727. 



HENGRAVE. 



59 



On a shield below the inscription are the arms of Gage, quarterly 
ist and 4th Gage, 2nd Darcy, 3rd Or, three quatrefoils Gules, D'Ewes.' 

Sir Thomas Gage was succeeded by his brother, Sir William Gage, 4th 
Bart., who married in 1741, Frances, daughter of Capt. Robert Harland, 
R.N., of Sproughton, and widow of John Ellis, of Cotton. 

On Sir William Gage's death, i7th May, 1767," without issue, the 
manor devolved on his cousin and heir, Sir Thomas Rookwood Gage, eldest 
son and heir of John Gage, the younger of the two sons of Sir William Gage, 
2nd Bart., by Elizabeth his wife, daughter and sole heir of Thomas Rook- 
wood, of Coldham Hall, Stanningfield, by Tamworth, daughter of Sir 
Roger Martin, of Long Melford, Bart. The manor at that time was com- 
posed of : 

s. d. 

1. The capital messuage of Hengrave Hall, with its 
offices, gardens, and appurtenances, and the park, farms, and 
lands therewith held, and the " Pidgeons Farm," in the 

parish of Hengrave, rented by William Ottley at . . . . 234 8 o 

2. A messuage or tenement and farm called the Grange 

Farm, in the parish of Hengrave, rented by John Stutter at . . 336 o o 

3 . A water-mill called Hengrave Mill and lands therewith 

held in the parish of Hengrave, rented by Thomas Gill at . . 73 o o 

4. Cottages in the parish of Hengrave . . . . . . 14 o o 

5. The quit rents of the manor . . . . i 10 o 

6. Profits of Courts of the said manor, one year with 

another . . i 10 o 



664 o o 

John Gage was one of the Pages of Honour to Louis XIV., and had 
died 2Oth July, 1728, in his 4Oth year. 

Sir Thomas Rookwood Gage, 5th Bart., in 1745 married Lucy, daughter 
of William Knight, of Kingerby, in Lincolnshire, sole heir of her brother, 
Richard Knight, and on her death, 3rd Sept. 1781, Sir Thomas married 
Mary, daughter of Patrick Fergus, of the Island of Montserrat. 

He died 2ist March, 1796, aged 77,' and the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Sir Thomas Gage, 6th Bart., who, 22nd Nov. 1779, married 
Charlotte, daughter of Thomas Fitzherbert, of Swinnerton, co. Stafford, 
by Mary Teresa, daughter of Sir Robert Throckmorton, 4th Bart. Sir 
Thomas Gage married 2ndly, 28th Sept. 1796, Charlotte, daughter of John 
Hooke Campbell, of Bangerston, in Pembrokeshire, uncle to John Campbell, 
Lord Cawdor, and dying ist Dec. 1798, the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir Thomas Gage, 7th Bart., who, gth Jan. 1809, married Lady Mary 
Anne Broune, daughter of Valentine, Earl of Kenmare, and died at Rome 
27th Dec. 1820, being buried in the Chiesa del Gessi, at Rome. 4 His widow 
remarried in 1835 William Vaughan, of Courtfield, co. Monmouth, and died 
I3th June, 1840. 

The manor passed to Sir Thomas Rokewode Gage, the elder, son and 
heir of Sir Thomas, he assuming the additional surname and arms of Roke- 
wode, by Royal licence in 1843. He married i6th Sept. 1850, Adelaide, 

'Howard's Visit, of Suff. vol. ii. p. 92. 3 Will 22nd Dec. 1795, proved 8th July, 
* His will is dated I4th May, 1767, and it 1796. 

was proved the 22nd of the same 4 Will 1820, proved June, 1844. 

month. 



60 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

youngest daughter and coheir of Henry Drummond, of Albury Park, co. 
Surrey, and died in Paris, 7th June, 1866, without issue, when the manor 
passed to his brother and heir, Sir Edward Rokewode Gage, gth Bart, 
(born aoth March, 1842), a major in the Scots Fusilier Guards, who, 2nd 
Aug. 1842, married Henrietta Mary, 2nd daughter of the Rev. Lord Frederick 
Beauclerk. 

The Qth Baronet Gage assumed by Royal licence in 1867 the additional 
surname and arms of Rokewode. He died 3rd Jan. 1872, without issue, 
when the manor devolved on his widow, Henrietta Mary, Lady Gage. She 
died 6th Jan. 1887, and by her will left the manor to her cousin, the Hon. 
Cecil Augustine Browne, who died two days later, 8th Jan. 1887, at the 
early age of 22, when the manor passed to his father, Sir Valentine Augustus 
Browne, K.P., Earl of Kenmare. He went to the hall that same month, 
but left in June the same year, when the hall was let. Lord Kenmare sold 
the manor to John Lysaght in 1894, and he went to live at the hall 6th April 
in that year. John Lysaght died ist Oct. 1896, when the manor passed 
to his trustees, who, 24th March, 1897, sold it to John Wood, the present 
lord, who went to reside at Hengrave Hall 29th Sept. in the same year. 
Mr. Wood is a J.P. and D.L. for Herefordshire, of which county he was 
High Sheriff in 1900 ; also a J.P. for Suffolk and Derbyshire, and M.P. for 
Stalybridge. He is the eldest son of the late J . H. Wood, J .P., of Whitfield, 
co. Derby, and married ist in 1883 Estelle, daughter of Henry Benham, 
and 2ndly in 1892, the Hon. Gertrude Emily, 3rd daughter of the 2nd 
Baron Bateman. 

To the manor belonged free fishing in the River Lark. In the return 
of the King's Justices, 14 Edw. I., the lord is said to have unam ripariam 
piscium. The fisheries were worth 2os. in the preceding reign. 1 

The present Hengrave Hall was built by Sir Thomas Kytson between 
1525 and 1538, " the gateway of which," says Gough, 2 " is of such singular 
beauty, and in such high preservation that perhaps a more elegant specimen 
of the architecture of the age in which it was erected cannot be seen." 

Accounts of the building of the hall will be found in the " History of 
Hengrave," by Gage, and the various vouchers and documents relating to 
the " repiracyouns and by Iding of the Manour of Hengrave ' ' will there be found . 
A summary of these several documents is given in the account of Hengrave 
in the Thingoe volume by the same author as follows : " The shell of the 
building within the moat was the work of John Eastowe, or Estow, who 
executed it after some model seen by him at Comby. The bay-windows, 
and probably the gate- house, were the work of John Sparke, who, as well 
as Thomas Dyrich, the chief carver, and John Birch, the joiner, were artisans 
from London. The materials were derived from several sources ; a great 
proportion of the brick was made on the spot, and large quantities came from 
the neighbouring kilns of the Abbot of Bury and others. Some of the 
freestone was brought from King's Cliff in Northamptonshire ; Sir Thomas 
Kytson's men being sent to work the quarry there, and the stone being 
transported, partly by land and partly by water, through Worlington 
and Brandon, to Hengrave. The rest was supplied from the dissolved 
abbeys of Ixworth, Bruwell, and Thetford. The old hall of the De 
Hemegraves, as well as several houses in the neighbourhood, furnished 

'Gage, Thingoe, p. 213. 'Additions to Camdcn's Britannia, vol. ii 

p. 82, ed. 1789. 



HENGRAVE. 



61 




o 
z 

u 

ffi 



62 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

materials towards the building. The timber came chiefly from Comby 
and Sowe woods in Suffolk. Some of the lead was brought from Ixworth 
priory ; and some, probably for the offices, from the monastery of St. 
Edmund, dissolved after the chief part of the mansion was finished. As 
far as an opinion can be formed from the documents detailed, the whole 
cost of the mansion would seem not greatly to have exceeded three thousand 
pounds.'" 

Gage gives an exhaustive account of the hall and site, from which we 
select the following interesting particulars: 

" Sir Thomas Kytson built his manor house on a flat, close to the 
parish church ; from which circumstance, among others, it may be con- 
jectured to have occupied the site of the more ancient hall of the family 
of De Hemegraves. The approach was by a straight causeway, fenced 
on each side by a deep ditch, lined with a triple row of trees, and terminating 
at a large semi-circular foss, over which a stone bridge led, at some little 
distance, to the outer court. This court was formed by a central or outer 
lodge, the residence of the keepers and falconers, and by a range of low 
surrounding buildings used for offices, including a stable for the horses 
of pleasure. Beyond was a moat, inclosing the mansion, which is a quad- 
rangular structure, of freestone and white brick, embattled, having an 
octagonal turret at each angle, with turrets larger and more ornamented 
that flank the gate-house or entrance to the inner court. By the removal, 
in the seventeenth century, of the outer court, and, in 1775, of a mass of 
building which projected at the east and north sides of the mansion, together 
with a high tower, the house has been reduced one-third, at least, from 
its original size. The moat has been filled up ; there was a bridge over 
it at the inner gate, figured with devices in polished flint-work, and also 
a drawbridge communicating with the church. 

" At some distance to the east and west were detached buildings, 
comprising the dovecote, the grange, the great barn, the mill, the forge, 
the great stable, and various offices, separate kennels for the hounds and 
spaniels, and the mews for the hawks. The mansion also had its great 
and little park, a vineyard or orchard, and gardens, a hop-ground and 
a hemp-ground, and was well provided with fish ponds ; a bowling-alley 
occupied the space between the north side of the house and the moat, 
having the convenience of an open corridor communicating with the hall ; 
and a pair of butts was placed on an artificial mound still visible in the 
upper part of the park. That the grounds were laid out in the true Dutch 
style, may be concluded from items in the household expenses for the 
year 1575. The waterworks were finished in 1583, as appears by an 
entry of account in that year.'" 

As to the architecture of the hall, see Add. MSS. British Museum, 
6753> 6986, 9753, and for portraits and pictures in the hall, Add. 6391 ; 
X. and Q., 8th ser. xii. 309; and Gage's " Thingoe," p. 222. 

The arms in the hall were out of Old Buckenham church in Norfolk, 
as may be seen in Blomefield. They were bought by Mr. Gage at Thetford. 

Arms of KYTSON, as altered I3th Feb. 1568 : Sable, three lucies 
eyrant Argent, a chief Or. Of GAGE : Gyronny four, Az. and Arg., a 
saltier Gules. Of ROKEWODE : Arg. 6 chess rooks, three, two, and one, 

'Gage, Thingoe, p. 214. "Gage, Thingoe, p. 215. 



HENGRAVE. 63 

Sable. Of BROWNE (Kenmare) : Arg. three martlets in pale between 
two flaunders, Sa. each charged with a lion passant guardant of the first, 
armed and langued Gules. Of LYSAGHT : Arg. three spears erect, Gu., 
on a chief Az. a lion of England, passant guard. Or. Of WOOD : Sa., on 
a bend engrailed Arg. between two roses of the last, barbed and seeded 
ppr., three fleurs-de-lis Gu. 



64 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

HORRINGER OR HORNINGSHEATH. 




MANOR was held here in the Confessor's time, and also 
at the time of the Survey, by the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
and consisted of 4 carucates of land, 3 villeins, 15 bordars, 

4 ploughteams in demesne and 5 belonging to the men, 
7 slaves, 3 acres of meadow, wood for the maintenance of 

5 hogs, and at the time of the Survey 5 rouncies and 14 
beasts. Also 30 hogs, 45 sheep, and 15 socmen, with a 

carucatc of land, a bordar, and 4 ploughteams. The abbot had sac, soc, 
and all customs over these men, and they could not give or sell the land 
without his licence. There was also a church living with 6 acres of free 
land. The value of the manor was formerly 6, increased to 8 at the 
time of the Survey. It was 9 quarantenes long and 8 broad, and paid 
in a gelt 2od. Others had holdings here. 1 

The only other holding in this place at the time of the Survey was that 
of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, and consisted of a socman under Wisgar, 
with 20 acres, 2 bordars, and a ploughteam, valued at 45.* 

MANOR OF HORNINGSHEATH (GREAT HORNINGSHEATH). 

Horningsheath is now more commonly called Horringer, and consists 
of the consolidated parishes of Great and Little Horningsheath and the 
hamlet of Horsecroft, which are not distinguished from each other in the 
Survey, but before the close of the reign of King Hen. II. it became divided 
into two parishes exclusive of the hamlet. 

In 1256 the convent of St. Edmund held in Great Horningsheath, 
with their manor (which was appropriated to the use of the cellarist), 
360 acres of land, 4^ acres of meadow, 60 acres of wood, one windmill, 
with foldage,and liberty of boar and sow, weff and warren, of the abbot. 
There were 100 acres in the hands of the villeins, with their messuages, 
and 100 acres which cottarii held, and 7^ acres which two other cottarii 
held, with their messuages. Among the principal tenants, Philip de 
Horkesle held a messuage and 100 acres of land, with liberty of foldage, 
boar and sow, of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, by the render of one pound 
of cummin yearly, and doing for himself and his tenants one suit to the 
Hundred every three weeks, and paying 6d. to the bailiff of the Hundred ; 
and the villeins of Philip held 16 acres, with their messuages. William de 
Neketon held one messuage and 50 acres of land of Thomas de Ikworth 
by the eighth part of a knight's fee, and he of the abbot ; and the rector 
held the church of the gift of the abbot, to which belonged 10 acres. 

In 1320 John le Saucer and Richard de Culford, chaplains, feoffees of 
Philip de Horkesle, granted 3 messuages, 86 acres of land, 3 acres of pasture, 
145. rent, and a pound of cummin, in Great Horningsheath, to Philip de 
Horkesle and Philippa his wife, for their lives, remainder to the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds and his successors for ever. 

\\illiam, Abbot of St. Edmunds, in 1501 leased to John Holders, of 
Fornham St. Martin, the Manor of Great Horningsheath (except certain 
lands therein mentioned, and the advowson of the church and manorial 
rights) for 14 years, at a rent, payable to the cellarist, of 20 quarters of 
wheat, 20 quarters of malt, and 20 quarters of peas, beside faggots, brush- 
wood, and straw. 

1 Dom. ii. 5566. 'Dom. ii. 3916. 



HORNINGSHEATH. 65 

In the Court Rolls of the manor in 1529, during the time of Thomas 
Gnattshall, cellarist of the monastery, mention is made of customary lands 
called Lollards' Way, and a field called Haxworth Cross, and a pightell 
called Cherry Bonce, and of Duckwell Lane. The leet fine from each 
tenant is recorded to be i2d. 

In 1546 Sir Thomas Darcy, afterwards Lord Darcy, of Chich, had a 
grant from the Crown in fee, among other manors, of the site and capital 
messuage of the Manor of Great Horningsheath, and all the manor of 
Great Horningsheath, with the appurtenances, late in the tenure of John 
Pryck, parcel of the possessions of the dissolved monastery of St. Edmund, 
the two closes called Harham and Wytersall, containing 44 acres, and all 
the lands lying between Bryckhill-gate and the Erode Okes in Great 
Horningsheath, Tharsk Oke Wood containing 15 acres, Nutnall Wood 
containing 18 acres, Whiteside Wood containing 23 acres, Sisage Grove 
containing 2^ acres, and Hall Grove containing half an acre, in Great 
Horningsheath, Hawsted, and Whepsted, and the advowson of the rectory 
of Great Horningsheath, subject to an annual payment to the Crown of 
4. $s. 2\d. 

The particulars for this part will be found in the Record Office. 1 

In 1549 Sir Thomas Darcy and Elizabeth his wife sold Great Hornings- 
heath and the advowson of the church, with other hereditaments, to Sir 
Robert Southwell, Master of the Rolls/ whose grandson, Sir Robert South- 
well, and Elizabeth his wife had had licence to convey to Geoffrey Gate 
and others in 1586 and 1609, and had licence to convey and did actually 
convey the manor and advowson to Sir Robert Jermyn, of Rushbrooke. 

Sir Robert Jermyn held his first court for the Manor of Great Hornings- 
heath i8th Dec. 1583, and amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time 
of Queen Elizabeth will be found an action in 1601 by Thomas Scott against him 
to establish title of plaintiff as customary tenant of the wood parcel of 
that manor. 3 And amongst the same Proceedings will be found a Bill 
to establish title by lease by Christopher Carleton and Audley his wife 
against Sir Robert Jermyn as to this manor held by lease from Sir Robert 
Southwell. 4 

On Sir Robert Jermyn's death in 1614, the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Sir Thomas Jermyn, Bart., and from this time descended through 
the Davers, the family of the Marquis of Bristol, in the same course as the 
Manor of Rushbrook, in Thedwestry Hundred, to the time of Frederick 
William, Earl of Bristol, who was created Marquis of Bristol, and from 
that time to the present in the .same course as the Manor of Ickworth, 
in this Hundred. 

HORNINGSHEATH PARVA MANOR. 

In 1197 Robert de Horningsheath, by fine before the King's justices 
at Westminster, acknowledged the service of half a knight's fee to be 
due for his lands in Horningsheath and Stow to Sampson, Abbot of St. 
Edmunds, which lands in Horningsheath were parcel of the fee of Peter, 
the brother of Burchard and afterward belonged to Adam de Hornings- 
herth, who was at the siege of Bedford in 1138, with his brother Robert, 
perhaps the father of the aforesaid Robert de Horningsherth. 

'D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 199. 3 C.P. iii. 62. 

*Fine, Easter, 3 Edw. VI. 4 C.P. i. 153- 

J 



6$ THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

To Robert de Horningsherth succeeded Walter, who is a witness 
to the licence granted by Simon, Abbot of St. Edmunds, for Thomas de 
Ickworth to empark in Ickworth. This Walter de Horningsheath was 
dead in 1286, having left issue Isabella, his daughter and heir, wife, first of 
Thomas de Helegaye, and 2ndly, of Nicholas de Aula Hospitum. 

In 1286 it was certified before the King's justices that the heir of 
Walter de Horningsherth was chief lord of Little Horningsheath, and 
held there 280 acres of land, 6 acres of meadow, 12 acres of wood, one 
windmill, with liberty of foldage, boar and sow, of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
by half a knight's fee, doing one suit to thfe Hundred every three weeks, 
and paying to the bailiff 45., and for castleward at the end of 20 weeks i8d. ; 
and among other things that the rector held the church of the gift of the 
abbot, and to the church belonged 16 acres of land. It was also at the 
same time certified that Isabella, the daughter of Walter de Horningsherth, 
held freely in Westow of the said abbot a messuage and 60 acres of land. 

In John de Northwold's Book of Fees, compiled in 1300, it is recorded 
that " Johes fil et heres Thome de Helegaye et Nichus de Aula Hospit 
et ux sua Isabella tenet di feod in Parva Hornygesherth et West Stowe 
q d qndam fuit Robti et olim Ade de Hornyng." 

It is presumed that John de Helegaye died without issue, leaving 
William his brother and heir ; for in 1323 Richard, Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
gave to Henry de Horningsheath the wardship of William, son and heir 
of William de Helegaye, and his marriage with one of the daughters of the 
said Henry, and the custody of all the lands of the heir in Great and Little 
Horningsherth, paying a rent of 405. 

This Henry de Horningsherth, for the good of his soul and the souls 
of his ancestors, released to Edmund, Abbot of St. Edmunds (Richard 
de Horningsherth being then sacrist), the service of three halfpence, payable 
for half an acre of land of his fee in the field called Horsecroft, and which 
William Brun had devised to St. Edmund for the use of the sacrist. 

In 1346 Philip de Clopton held the manor, and was assessed to the 
aid for knighting the King's son, in respect of a fourth part of a knight's 
fee of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, in Horningsheath, formerly held by John 
de Helegaye ; and Joan Cosyn was assessed in respect of another fourth 
part of the same fee, formerly holden by Nicholas att Gesthall. 

John Coote succeeded to the fee of Philip de Clopton and Joan Cosyn, 
and in 1430 did homage to the Abbot of St. Edmunds for his lands in 
Culford and Little Horningsheath. In the time of Hen. VI. we meet with a 
chancery action relating to this manor and the Manors of Ikeworth, Saxham, 
and Westley by Robert Newton against John "Cote." 1 Richard Coote 
died seised of part of the fee in 1495, leaving Robert his son and heir, and 
the greater part of the fee became vested in Philip Barnard and John 
Hacon. 

The inquisition states that the manor was held of the Abbot of Bury 
by knight's service, and that Richard Coote being seised of a moiety 
enfeoffed trustees to the uses of his will, and by will devised to Robert Coote 
liis son in tail male, with remainder to Christopher Coote his other son in 
tail male. Robert was but eight years old at his father's death. 2 

In 1517 John, Abbot of St. Edmunds, under a licence in mortmain 
from the Crown, purchased from Philip Barnard and John Hacon the Manor 

'E.C.P. Bundle 53, 7. f I.P.M.. n Hen. VII. 1180. 



HORNINGSHEATH. 67 

of Horningsheath Hall, with the appurtenances and 3 messuages, 200 acres 
of land, 20 acres of meadow, 100 acres of pasture, 30 acres of wood, and 2os. 
rent in Little Horningsheath, Ickworth, Little "Saxham, Great Saxham, 
and WesQey ; and from Robert Coote a tenement and 60 acres of land in 
Great Horningsheath, Little Horningsheath, Ickworth, Great Saxham, 
and Westley ; besides certain lands of Thomas Jermyn in Barton, Rougham, 
and Troston. 

The Abbot of St. Edmunds held Little Horningsheath in demesne as 
half a knight's fee at the time of the dissolution of the monastery, and it 
was parcel of the lands which the Crown gave to Lord Darcy by the follow- 
ing description : " All the capital messuage called Horniger otherwise 
Little Horniger, or Little Hornyngsherth, with the app't's ; and the 
following lands in Little Horningsherth, Great Horningsherth, and Westley : 
Mylle-field, containing xx acres, Westysdale, xv acres, the downes vj 
acres, a piece abbutting on Chevington-way ix acres, the Long-went xv. 
acres, Westley-field xxvij. acres, a piece of land at Needlegate xij. acres, 
xxij. acres lying at the back of the church of Little Horniger, xv. acres 
abbutting on the Mere, ij . acres and a half lying in Great Horniger, half an 
acre of land lying in Westley-field, the field called Westledale containing 
three acres, three acres and a half in the downes, the pasture called Pistell- 
hill xxix. acres. Stystey-field xvj . acres, Littenleas xxvj. acres, the Comen 
close iij. acres, the Stubbing ij. acres, Golder's Close xvij. acres, Ram 
pasture and Wood field xij. acres, three closes containing ix. acres, three 
other closes containing xv. acres, a piece called Leye in Westley-field 
containing viij. acres, a meadow in Horningfield containing x. acres, a 
tenement and an acre of pasture adjoining ; likewise five acres and a half 
of pasture and an acre of arable land late in the tenure of William Percival ; 
which hereditaments in Great Horningsherth, Little Horningsherth, and 
Westley had, by an indenture dated 8th May, 1539, been leased to Lord 
Darcy, then Sir Thomas Darcy, for 21 years ; and also Cowt's-wood and 
Clopton-wood, containing xiv. acres in Little Horningsherth ; and the 
advowson of the church of Little Horningsherth." 

This property was comprised in the purchase made by Sir Robert 
Southwell from Lord Darcy in 1549 ; and in the following year was sold 
by Sir Robert to John Moore, of Great Peckham, in the County of Kent, 
gentleman, and Agnes his wife. 

In 1552 John Moore and Agnes conveyed Little Horningsheath to 
Thomas Lucas, of Horsecroft, 1 who in 1562 sold it to Sir Ambrose Jermyn, 
of Rushbrooke, and Anne his wife/ from whom it descended to his son 
and heir, Sir Robert Jermyn, to whom Great Horningsheath belonged by 
purchase. 

In 1579 a claim was made by the Crown on Lady Dorothea Jermyn, 
widow, for forfeiture of this manor. 3 

Dorothy, Lady Jermyn, by her ist husband, Sir George Blagge, was 
mother of Henry and Judith Blagge, whom she matched, the one with 
Hester Jermyn and the other with Sir Robert Jermyn, children of her 2nd 
husband, the before-mentioned Sir Ambrose Jermyn, by his ist marriage. 

Upon Dorothy, Lady Jermyn, Sir Robert settled Little Horningsheath 
for her life. In 1581 the Badby family granted to Henry Blagge and Hester 

1 Fine, Easter, 6 Edw. VI. 3 M. 21 Eliz. Mich. Rot. 20. 

'Fine, Hil. 5 Eliz. 



68 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

his wife the site of the monastery of St. Edmunds, which in 1592 was 
conveyed to Sir Robert Jermyn. Whether he gave in exchange the rever- 
sion of Horningsheath does not appear. 

Thomas Blagge, of Little Horningsheath, grandson and heir of Henry, 
a colonel of a regiment of foot, had the custody of Wallingford Castle, 
which he long gallantly defended against the Parliament. He served 
Kings Chas. I. and II. as Groom of the Bedchamber, and by the latter 
monarch was appointed Governor of Yarmouth and Landguard Fort. 

By Maria, daughter of Sir Roger North, of Mildenhall, Thomas Blagge 
left issue four daughters, his coheirs (i) Henrietta Maria, wife of Sir Thomas 
Yarborough, of Snaith, in the County of York ; (2) Dorothy ; (3) Mary, 
one of the Maids of Honour to the Duchess of York, who became wife of 
Coldough ; and (4) Margaret, a lady of rare merit, wit, and beauty, Maid 
of Honour to Queen Catharine, who married Sidney Godolphin, created 
Earl of Godolphin, and made Lord High Treasurer of England. 1 

The manor then appears to have passed to the Gipps family, and was 
held by Sir Richard Gipps,"" of Horningsheath, who died 28th Sept. 1681, 
and by his son and heir, Richard Gipps, a major in the army. It subse- 
quently vested in Thomas Davers and Katharine his mother, who by deeds 
dated gth and loth Oct. 1752, sold the same to George William, Earl of 
Bristol, and from that time the manor has descended in the same course 
as Ickworth Manor. 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Edward Crofte, who 
died I4th Feb. 1587, leaving Thomas, his son and heir, 18 years of age. 3 

Little Horningsheath Hall would seem to have been dismantled in 
1759, shortly after the sale of it to Lord Bristol, for we meet with the follow- 
ing advertisement : " To be sold at Horningsheth Hall, several very good 
windows and fine wainscoat sashes and a beautiful staircase, fitted up with 
wainscoat in a very grand manner. The said staircase to be sold at a very 
low price to the first gentleman that comes." 4 

In Little Horningsheath Hall in the great chamber were in the reign 
of King Chas. II., carved and painted the arms of King Edward the Con- 
fessor and those of the abbots of Bury who had this hall, Hargrave, Red- 
grave, Melford, and Elmswell Hall for their country seats and pleasure 
houses. 

Arms of COOTE : Argent, a chevron between three cootes, Sable. Of 
BLAGGE : Argent, two bends, engrailed, Gules. 



'All the above is practically from Gage, 3 I.P.M., 4 and 5 P. & M. 21. 

Thingoe, 516 to 522. 'ipsu-ich Journal, 24th March, 1759. 

'See Manor of Fornham St. Genevieve.in 

Thedwestry Hundred. 




ICKWORTH. 69 

ICKWORTH. 

| HE Abbot of St. Edmunds had a manor here in the time of 
the Confessor and also when the Survey was taken, con- 
sisting of 3 carucates of land, 9 villeins, 3 bordars, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne, 4 belonging to the men, 4 slaves, 6 acres 
of meadow, wood for the maintenance of 24 hogs, also a 
mill, 2 rouncies, 16 beasts, 30 hogs, and 80 sheep. There 
was also a church living with half an acre of land. This 
manor was formerly valued at 3 to 4 at the time of the Survey. It was 
8 quarentenes in length and 5 in breadth, and paid in a gelt fed. 1 

MANOR OF ICKWORTH. 

The lordship appears to have been included in the gift made to the 
abbey of St. Edmunds by the will of Theodred, Bishop of the East Angles, 
promoted to the see of London in the time of King Edgar or of his son 
Edmund. 2 

Ickworth was held by the Abbot of St. Edmunds in demesne as 3 
carucates in the time of the Confessor. At the time of the Survey we find 
that Ulward held of the abbot the Manors of Wangford and Flempton, 
and an exchange was effected, Ulward giving back Elveden to the monastery 
in exchange for Ickworth. It appears that Ulward to the prejudice of 
the rights of the monastery did homage for his lands to King Hen. I. The 
King subsequently confirmed to Goslin, the son of Ulward de Wangford, 
his father's lands by the same services under which he had held them. 

Goslin was succeeded by Sir William de Ickworth living in 1184, and 
he by Sir Richard (Consuetudinary of St. Edmunds). In 1197 Sir Richard 
de Ickworth, by fine before the King's Justices at Westminster, acknowledged 
to hold of Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, two knights' fees in Ickworth, 
Wangford, Horningsheath and Flempton. He married Sibilla, daughter 
of John de Mansion, and left issue Philip and Thomas de Ickworth. 

Philip de Ickworth died prior to 1248,' and by an inquisition it was 
found that at the time of his decease he held two knights' fees which had 
been holden by Sir Richard de Ickworth of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
and which, with the dower of Sir Richard's widow, were worth yearly 40. 
He died without issue, and the manor passed to his brother and heir, Thomas 
de Ickworth, who in 1248 did fealty to the King for all the lands which 
Philip his brother, deceased, had held of the monastery of St. Edmunds, 
then vacant and in the King's hands. 

Six years later the King granted to Thomas de Ickworth, at the instance 
of Eudo de Shelf hanger, free warren in his lands of Ickworth and Wangford, 4 
and from Simon, Abbot of St. Edmunds, he had licence to empark lands 
in Ickworth, and to the abbot he released all right to estrays and weffs 
in his lands of Ickworth, Manston, and Wargford. 

Thomas de Ickworth died during the reign of Hen. III., leaving amongst 
other children two sons, Simon de Ickworth and John, and on the death 
of the former without issue the manor passed to his nephew, Thomas de 
Ickworth, son and heir of John. The holding of this Thomas, chief lord 

'Dom. ii. 3576. 3 I.P.M., 5 Hen. III. 164. 

2 A translation of the will may be seen in 4 Chart. Rolls, 37 and 38 Hen. III. pt. ii. 10. 
Gage's Thingoe, p. 272-5. 



TO THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Ickworth, was not of very great extent. As given by Gage it was as 
follows : 

" He held of the Abbot of St. Edmunds by the service of one knight's 
fee, a messuage, 450 acres of land, 19 acres of meadow and pasture, 17 acres 
of wood, a windmill, with warren, and liberty of foldage, doing for himself 
and his tenants one suit to the Hundred ; he also held the advowson of the 
church of Ickworth ; and his villeins held 115 acres, and the cottarii 15 
acres. 

" Ralph, son of Ralph de Ickworth, held of the said Thomas a messuage 
and 88 acres of land, 5 acres of meadow, and 8 acres of wood, for the fourth 
part of a knight's fee ; Roger de Tofts held of the said Thomas 50 acres of 
land for the eighth part of a knight's fee ; Humphrey de Woodhall 20 acres 
of the said Ralph ; and the Prior of Bromhill held a messuage and 58^ 
acres of land, that is to say, the messuage and 50 acres in free alms, and 
4 acres of the heir of William de Necton, and the remainder of Ralph." 1 

Thomas de Ickworth was the first of four successive lords of the name 
of Thomas. He left issue three children, Thomas, Agnes, wife of Richard 
de Manston, and Margaret, wife of John Park. Thomas the son of Amy 
his wife, who survived him and became the wife of Walter Bernard, had 
issue an only child, Thomas de Ickworth ; the 3rd married Joan, daughter 
and coheir of John de Geddyng, and in 1337 by fine, 2 levied between himself 
and Joan his wife, and Simon, Parson of Ousden, and Ralph de Ousden, 
chaplain, settled the manorsof Ickworth and Wang ford, with the advowsons of 
the churches thereof, subject to the dower of Amy his mother, then wife of 
Walter Bernard, in the former manor upon himself, the said Thomas de 
Ickworth the third, and Joan his wife in tail, remainder to Richard Fresel 
in tail, which Richard Fresel married Katharine, eldest daughter and coheir 
of John de Geddyng. 

By Joan his wife Thomas the 3rd left an only son Thomas, and a 
daughter Katharine, wife of Sir John Cokerell. Thomas de Ickworth, the 
4th, married Agnes, sister and heir of John Tamworth, and left issue an 
only son, Ralph de Ickworth. Agnes surviving was seised of the Manor 
of Ickworth for her life, and became the wife of Nicholas Hethe, of Bury 
St. Edmunds, and afterwards of Edm. Lucas, of Westow. 

In 1405 Nicholas Hethe and Agnes his wife granted the manor to Ralph 
Ickworth, son and heir of the said Thomas, and to Richard Hethe and 
others ; and in 1408 there was a further conveyance from Nicholas Hethe 
and Agnes his wife to Sir Roger Drury, Nicholas Drury, Thomas Hethe the 
elder, and Thomas Hethe the younger. 

Ralph de Ickworth dying without issue, his aunt, Katharine Cokerell, 
became entitled to the reversion of the manor expectant upon the decease 
of Agnes de Ickworth. There was issue of Katharine Cokerell, a son John, 
who died in her lifetime, leaving an only daughter Katharine, aged six 
years at the time of the death of her grandmother, Katharine Cokerell, 
which happened on Saturday after the feast of St. Michael in I428. 3 

Katharine the granddaughter did not long survive, dying on Monday 
after the feast of St. Luke the Evangelist in 1431. 4 On her decease the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds, in virtue of his barony, claimed the manor as an 
escheat by reason of a failure of heirs of Thomas de Ickworth, but the Crown 

1 Ga*e, Thingoe, p. 2/8, 27Q. 3 1.P.M., 6 Hen. VI. 63 ; 7 Hen. VI. 63. 

iiEdw. III. 6. "I.P.M., loHen. VI. 35- 



ICKWORTH. 71 

procured an inquisition to be taken, finding that George Hethe was the 
heir of Thomas de Ickworth, which was a mere pretence, the real object 
of the inquisition being to prove that the lands were held of the Crown and 
not of the abbot. John Brockeley, alderman of London, claimed as heir 
of Katharine, late wife of John Cokerell, and brought an action in the Court 
of Chancery, wherein Sir William Drury, William Sekynton, clerk, Piers 
Awdeley, and others were defendants, 1 and a second action in 1437 in which 
John Bonde was defendant. 2 A third action brought by the said John 
Brockeley describes the relationship of the contending parties. John 
Brockeley describes himself as "son of Agnes, daughter of Alexander, son 
of Agnes, sister of Thomas, father of Thomas, father of Katharine, late the 
wife of John Cokerell, mother of John, father of Katharine, who died in 
the King's ward," against " William Drurye, Knt., William Sekyngton, 
clerk, James Andre we, Stephen Wedeyngsete, Edmund Sproul and Piers 
Audeley, late feoffees to uses as to the manors of Wamford and Ickworth 
obtained by George Heth as being son of Agnes, sister of Katharine, late 
wife of John Cokerell." 3 Mr. Gage, in his " History of Thingoe," states 
very clearly the respective claims and the result. He says : " John 
Brockley exhibited his pedigree showing that he was the heir, as the lineal 
representative of Agnes de Manston, the great-aunt of Thomas de 
Ickworth ; while the Drury family, with more success, maintained their 
rights, whether founded upon the old entail created by the fine levied in 
1335 by Thomas de Ickworth the father, under which Sir William Drury, 
of Rougham, might have been entitled as tenant in tail, as son and heir of 
Sir Roger, eldest son and heir of Nicholas Drury the elder, by Joan his wife, 
daughter and sole heir of Simon Saxham, by Agnes his wife, surviving child 
and heir of the aforesaid Sir Richard Fresel; or, as that intail, it is probable, 
had been barred, upon the deeds above noticed of 1428 and 1431, to which 
Nicholas Hethe and Agnes his wife and Ralph de Ickworth were parties ; 
as well as upon a feoffment executed by Katharine Cokerell, the grand- 
mother. 

" After much contention, in which the abbot complains of the opposition 
which he met with from some of the great men of the State, the matter was 
agreed to be referred to the arbitration of William de la Pole, Earl of 
Suffolk, John Cotesmore, and William Paston ; a bond in the penalty of 
200 being given to the abbot by Sir William Drury, that he, and all persons 
claiming right in the said manors, would abide by their decision. 

" The arbitrators by their award, dated 28th May, 1432, determined that 
the abbot should suffer Sir William Drury and all others claiming the said 
manors, to recover the same by confession, in an assize of novel disseisin, 
and by judgment against the abbot, Robert Wesenham, monk of St. 
Edmunds, Agnes de Ickworth, called in the proceedings Agnes Hethe, and 
John Powell ; Sir William paying all costs, and giving to the abbot 100 
marks. 

"Agnes de Ickworth, the tenant for life of the Manor of Ickworth, did 
not die until 1437. Though the manor was recovered, as before stated, by 
Sir William Drury (and he presented to the living in 1426), his cousin, 
Henry Drury, became the possessor of it, who was either a purchaser of it 
or may have been equitably entitled to it under the above deeds of the 
6th and gth years of Hen. VI." 4 

1 E.C.P. Bundle 12, 165. 3 E.C.P. Bundle 68, 14. 

2 E.C.P. Bundle 9, 316. "Gage, Thingoe, p. 282, 283. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Henry Drury was escheator for Suffolk in 1438. He died in the life- 
time of his father, Nicholas Drury, and under his will, dated 4th January, 
1454,' in which he gave to Elizabeth, late wife of his son Henry Drury, 
" his silver bowl with the cover graven with a moUt." By Elizabeth his 
wife, daughter and heir of George Eton,* he had issue a son Henry, who died 
an infant, and a daughter Jane. Elizabeth was tenant for life of the Manor 
of Ickworth. 3 Jane, the sole heir of Henry Drury, died in her mother's 
lifetime, having married ist Thomas Hervey. He was, according to some 
pedigrees, son of John Hervey, of Thirley, co. Bedford, by Alice, daughter 
of Nicholas Morley , of Glyn, co. Sussex, which John was son of John Hervey, by 
Christian his wife, daughter of John Chicheley, which John was son of Thomas 
Hervey, by Jane his wife, daughter of William Paston, which Thomas was son 
of John Hervey by Margaret his wife, daughter of Sir William Calthorpe, 
which John was son of John Hervey by Margaret his wife, daughter and 
coheir of Sir John Nornueit, and heir also of her grandmother Ales, daughter 
and heir of Thomas Buckhorne, of Buckland, co. Bucks., which John was 
son of William Hervey and Mary his wife, daughter and coheir of Richard 
Foliott, which William was son of John Hervey, the son of Adam Hervey 
and Juliana his wife, daughter and heir of John Fitz Hugh, which Adam was 
son of Osbert, the son of Henry, the son of Hervey, who lived in the time 
of Rich. I. 4 Jane, the widow of Thomas Hervey, married 2ndly Sir William 
Carew. By her ist husband, who died before 1470,* she left several 
children, the eldest of whom, William Hervey, succeeded to the lordship of 
Ickworth. 

There is a chancery suit relating to the manor by Sir W illiam Carew 
and Jane his wife against Elizabeth Drury , late wife of Henry Drury, 
Roger Drury, of Hunstede (sic), and others, 6 the action relating also to the 
advowson of Ickworth church. Thomas Hervey's widow, Lady Carew, 
died and July, 1525, and was buried at St. Mary's church, Bury St. 
Edmunds. 

William Hervey married Joan, daughter of John Cokett, of Ampton, 
and died ist Aug. 1528, and there was formerly in the nave of St. Mary's 
church, Bury St. Edmunds, at the west end, an inscription as follows : 

" Pray for the soul of Will'm Harvye 
Esquire, obijt i Augusti 1528." 



1 Proved 2nd Sept. 1456. 
Arms : Argent, three bars Gules, a canton 
Sahle. 

3 A copy of her will is given in Gage's 

Thingoe, p. 283. 

4 According to the pedigree given by Dr. 

Howard in his annotated Visitation 
of Suffolk, vol. ii. p. 188, Thomas 
Hervey who married Jane Drury 
was son of John Hervey senior and 
Joan his wife, daughter and coheir 
of Sir John Niernuyt, of Burnham, 
co. Bucks, which John was son of 
John and Margery his wife, daugh- 
ter of Ralph Paries, which John 
was the son of Sir John Hervey by a 
daughter of D'Engayne, which Sir 
John was the son of William Hervey, 
of Ley and Wotton, and Mary or 
Margary his wife, daughter and 
coheir of Richard Foliott, which 



William was son of John Hervey 
and Joan, daughter and heir of 
Hamon of Thurleigh, which John 
was son of Adam FitzHervey in 
ward to Hen. III., lord of Ormesby, 
in Norfolk, 1226, by Juliana his wife, 
daughter of John Fitzhugh, which 
Adam was son of Osbert FitzHervey, 
Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, 1182, 
one of the King's Justices, by 
Dionysia his wife, daughter of 
Geoffrey de Grey, of Bedfordshire, 
which Osbert was son of Herveus. 

s The date, 1477, on the inscription to his 
memory in Ickworth church (which 
is not an original inscription) is 
obviously an error. But Jacob in 
his Peerage states that Thomas 
Hervey was council for the City of 
Tournay in 1517. 

'E.C.P. Bundle 42. 20. 



ICKWORTH. 73 

In Ickworth church are the arms of Hervey impaling Cockett, with the 
inscription set up by Augustus John, Earl of Bristol :- 

In memory of 
William Herve born in 1465 

dyed in 1538 (?) 

and of Joan His Wife Daughter of 
John Cocket of Ampton in Suffolk 

Both buried in 
St. Mary's Church at St. Edmundsbury. 

The manor passed to William's son and heir, John Hervey, who in 
1547 levied a fine of it against John Drury.' He married Elizabeth, 
daughter of Henry Pope, of Mildenhall, and died according to the inscrip- 
tion in Ickworth church, nth July, 1556," and was buried at Ickworth, 
where there is an inscription (but not original) to his memory and that of 
his wife : 

Here lyeth the body of 

John Harvaye 

born 1487, died nth July 1556 

and of Elizabeth his wife 

daughter of Henry Pope 

of Mildenhall. 

The arms are Hervey impaling Or two chevrons Gules on a canton of 
the second a mullet of the first, Pope. The inscription date is certainly 
inaccurate, for John Hervey's will is dated the i6th August, 1556, so he 
could not have died the previous month. It was proved in London 2ist 
Nov. 1556, by Elizabeth his widow and executrix. 3 

John Hervey's will contains the following gift as to this manor : " Item, 
I bequeathe to Elizabeth my wief my maner of Ikwurth, with all my pur- 
chased landes, meadowes, pastures, fedinges, and the lybertie of the felde. 
Also, as moche woode as she will spende during her lief, but not to sell, 
paying unto my son John, xjli. xiijs. iiij^. by yere during her lief, if he 
lyvethe so longe, or ells to remayne to her during her lief. Item, my will 
is that all my shepe in Ikwurth, nete bulles, geldings, mares, corne, stuf of 
houshold, and plate, shalbe praysed, and the said Elizabeth my wief to 
have the occupacion of all during her lief, as her owne. And after her 
decease, the remaynder to my sonne William, and to his heires males of 
his bodie lawfully begotten ; and for lacke of suche yssue to remayn to 
my next heire male." The manor accordingly passed to the widow 
Elizabeth, and upon her death devolved upon John's son and heir, William 
Hervey. 

A fine (no doubt by way of settlement on the marriage of his son, whose 
marriage settlement bears date 26th April, 1583), was levied of the manor 
against William Hervey and others by Sir John Heigham and others in 1583." 

1 Fine, Easter, i Edw. VI. 3 Register, Kitchen, f. 23. A copy of this 

2 1. P.M., 3 and 4, P. & M. Bury, i6th March, will is amongst the Add. MSS. in 

p. I n. 100. the Brit. Mus. 34679, and is given by 

Dr. Howard, Visit, of Suff. vol. ii. 
p. 171. 
4 Fine, Trin. 25 Eliz. 

K 



74 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

He died 3oth Nov. 1592,' was buried at Ickworth 2nd Nov. that year, 1 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Hervey, born in 1555. 
He died in 1630, and was buried at Ickworth 2nd July that year, his wife 
having predeceased him 22nd Feb. 1619-20. 

He was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir William Hervey, who was 
knighted at \\ hitehall 3oth April, 1608. He was married to his ist wife 
Susan, daughter of Sir Robert Jermyn, of Rushbrook (grandfather of Sir 
Henry Jermyn, Earl of St. Albans) on Sunday, 2ist March, 1612-3, in St. 
Mary's church, Bury St. Edmunds, on which day of the month and week 
he was born in the same town in 1585. In 1627 he was elected to represent 
his native town in Parliament, but being in years, lived afterwards a retired 
life without concerning himself in the Civil Wars, and departed this life 
3Oth Sept. 1660, and was buried at Ickworth 3rd Oct. that year, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, John Hervey. In the last Parliament 
called by King Chas. I. which met at Westminster 3rd Nov. 1640, and con- 
tinued sitting until 2oth April, 1653, ne represented the port of Hythe, 
in Kent, but asserting the Royal prerogative and attaching himself to the 
Royal cause, he was excluded the House, and had to compound under the 
designation of " John Hervey, of Ickworth," for his estates with the Parlia- 
ment, and that for the moderate sum of 24, while his father's name, though 
living, does not appear at all in the list of compounders. Having heartily 
concurred in the restoration of King Chas. II. he was constituted Treasurer 
of the Household to Queen Catherine his consort, and was in the greatest 
intimacy with the most eminent men in the kingdom. In Parliament he 
represented Hythe from r66i to 1678, and was one of the leading members. 
Bishop Burnet relates of him " that he was one whom the King (Chas. II.) 
loved personally, and yet upon a great occasion he voted against that which 
the King desired. So the King chid him severely for it. Next day another 
important question falling in, he voted as the King would have him. So the 
King took notice of it at night, and said, " You were not against me to-day." 
He answered : " No, sir, I was against my conscience to-day." He was 
a great patron of men of letters, and the famous Cowley, by his recommen- 
dation, was taken into the service of his kinsman Henry, Earl of St. Albans, 
Lord Chamberlain of the Household to the King. 

He died i8th Jan. 1679, without issue, and was buried at Ickworth, 
where there is the following inscription : 

Hie jacet Johannes Hervey armiger 

(filius Gulielmi Hervey Equitis Aurati) 

qui erat a Thesauris serenissimae 

Reginae Catharinae 

uxoremq ; duxit Elizabethan! filiam 
unicam et haeredem viri Prasnobilis 

Gulielmi Hervey Baronis 
de Kidbrook in comitatu Cantiae. 

Obijt xviij" die Jan. An. Dom. MDCLXXIX" aetat. suae LXIV. 
Insignis, pollens, largus, perfectus, abundans, 
Moribus, ingenio, munere, corde, bonis. 

'For the marriages of the Herveys, and "I. P.M., Bury, 24th April, 35 Eliz. 103. 
fuller particulars, see Wordwell 
Manor, in Blackhourn Hundred. 



ICKWORTH. 75 

The manor passed to John's next surviving brother and heir, Sir Thomas 
Hervey, knighted by. King Chas. II. 

Sir Thomas Hervey was elected for Bury St. Edmunds in the three 
last Parliaments of Chas. II., as also in that called by Jas. II., and in all 
others to the time of his death. He showed himself in all walks of life to 
be one of the best of men, and was noted for his piety, charity, and other 
Christian and moral virtues whereby he acquired universal esteem. He 
married Isabella, daughter of Sir Humphrey May, Vice-Chamberlain to 
Chas. I., and died 27th May, 1694, being interred with his ancestors at 
Ickworth ist June that year, where there is the following inscription to his 
memory : 

Here lye the Bodyes of 

Sr Thomas Hervey 
and Dame Isabella his wife 
who were most Eminent Examples 
of Piety, Charity, and Conjugal Affection. 
She departed this life the 

5th of June 1686 
in the 6ist year of her age : 
And he the 27th of May 1694 

in the 6gth year of his age : 
With every Virtue so Divinely Bless' d 
That each had made them Saints without the rest. 



The arms of Hervey impaling a fesse between eight billets, May. 

The manor passed to Sir Thomas's eldest surviving son and heir, John 
Hervey, born 27th Aug. 1665, created Baron Hervey of Ickworth by patent 
23rd March, 1702-3, and Earl of Bristol by patent igih Oct. 1714. His 
eldest son by his ist wife the Hon. Carr, Lord Hervey, died I4th Nov. 1723, 
in his 33rd year unmarried, and the Earl's eldest son by his 2nd wife, John, 
Lord Hervey, Baron of Ickworth in consideration of his merits, was summoned 
to Parliament by writ nth June, 1733, and served for many years in the 
office of Chamberlain, being afterwards appointed Lord Privy Seal, a Cabinet 
Privy Councillor, and twice one of the Lords Justices of the Kingdom. He 
married 2gth Oct. 1720, Mary, daughter and heir of Gen. Nicholas Lepell. 
She had been one of the Maids of Honour to Caroline, Princess of Wales. 
He distinguished himself in many of the debates in the House, and was 
much esteemed for his learning and oratory. He died 5th Aug. 1743,' 
in his father's lifetime, being buried at Ickworth i2th of the same month, 
where these lines are inscribed : 

Huic versatile ingenium, sic pariter 

ad omnia fuit, 

Ut natum ad id unum diceres 

Quodcunque ageret. 

'Will proved 1743. 



;6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

His widow survived until 2nd Sept. 1768. She was buried at Ickworth, 
the following lines from the pen of Horace Walpole being inscribed to her 
memory : 

Awhile, oh linger, sacred Shade ! 

Till ev'ry solemn due be paid ; 

The tears from Filial Love that flow, 

The sighs that Friendship long must know ! 

But, ah ! within this narrow space 

How each engaging virtue trace ? 

How shall each sweetness be defin'd 

That grace thy form, or bless thy mind ? 

Charms that in youth attractive shone, 

Glow'd ripe in their meridian sun, 

And spite of ruthless winter's rage, 

Melted into becoming age. 

Knowledge matured the fruits of sense, 

Nor shook the bloom of diffidence ; 

So silent and so modest, too, 

As tasting but what others knew. 

Proud of humility, the sage, 

In thy unvary'ng temper's page 

Or saw, or might have deign' d to see 

The beauties of Propriety. 

Nor while sustain'd each decent part 

Could Prudence self pervert the heart ; 

Through life thy ev'ry friend the same, 

Each foe thy study to reclaim. 

Pain could not chase thy friendly smile ; 

Not to afflict was all thy toil ; 

Thy woes alone unwont to speak, 

For Patience dwelt upon thy cheek. 

But in the solemn scene of death 

How paint the calm of fleeting breath ? 

When fortitude resembled ease, 

And the last pang seem'd most to please ! 

In vain the Sculptor or the Muse 

So sad, so sweet a theme pursues ; 

The chisel drops, th' unfinish'd strain 

Respects the Son it soothes in vain! 1 

Hon. HORACE WALPOLE, Esq., fecit. 

John, Lord Hervey, left four sons, three of whom became successively 
Earls of Bristol, and four daughters. John Hervey, ist Earl of Bristol, 
died 20th Jan. 1750-1," and was buried at Ickworth, where also his 2nd 
wife had been buried gth May, 1741. He was succeeded by his grandson, 
(John, Lord Hervey's eldest son) George William, 2nd Earl of Bristol. 
He had succeeded to the barony of his father in 1743 as Lord 
Hervey of Ickworth, and on the death of Charles, Earl of Suffolk, 
22nd April, 1745, by his grandmother, with Elizabeth, Countess of 
Portsmouth, were heirs to his estate and to the Barony of Howard, of 
Walden. In 1758 he was appointed Ambassador-Extraordinary 

'Howard's Visit, of Suff. vol. ii. 151. 'Will Dec. 1750, proved 23rd Feb. 1750-1. 



ICKWORTH. 77 

and Plenipotentiary to Spain, in 1766 became a Privy Councillor, and Lord- 
Lieutenant of Ireland 1766-1767, Lord Privy Seal 1768-70. He died i8th 
March, 1775,' unmarried, and was buried at Ickworth 26th March, 1775, 
when the manor devolved upon his brother and heir, Augustus John Hervey^ 
3rd Earl of Bristol, a distinguished naval officer, who before his accession 
to the Earldom sat in Parliament for Bury St. Edmunds 1757 and 1761, 
and Saltash 1763-68 

He died 23rd Dec. 1779, in St. James' Square, London, without issue, 
and was buried at Ickworth 28th Sept. 1779,' when the manor devolved 
upon his next brother and heir, Frederick Augustus Hervey, 4th Earl of 
Bristol, D.D., Bishop of Deny. He died 8th July, 1803, at Albano, near 
Rome, and was buried at Ickworth 2ist April, 1804, when the manor 
passed to his eldest surviving son and heir, Frederick William Hervey, 5th 
Earl, created by patent dated 3oth June, 1826, Marquis of Bristol and Earl 
Jermyn, of Great Horningsheath. He was also hereditary High Steward 
of the liberty of St. Edmund, and married 2oth Feb. 1798, Elizabeth 
Charlotte Albinia, 2nd daughter of Clotworthy Upton, ist Lord Templeton 
(through descent from whom the Hervey family are founder's heirs at 
All Souls Coll., Oxford). 

In 1801 his lordship was appointed Under-Secretary of State for Foreign 
Affairs, and was a member of the various learned societies, was F.R.S. and 
F.S.A. He died I5th Feb. 1859, when the manor vested in his eldest son, 
Frederick William Hervey, 2nd Marquis. His lordship represented Bury 
St. Edmunds, and later West Suffolk, in Parliament from 1826 to 1859, 
and married at St. James', Westminster, gih Oct. 1830, Katharine Isabella, 
4th daughter of John Henry Manners, 5th Duke of Rutland, and dying 
3Oth Oct. 1864, the manor passed to his son and heir, Frederick William 
John Hervey, 3rd Marquis, and loth Earl of Bristol, Earl Jermyn, and Baron 
Hervey, of Ickworth, who, like his father, was both F.R.S. and F.S.A., and 
represented West Suffolk in Parliament from 1859 to 1864, and 4th March, 
1862, married Geraldine Georgiana Mary, 5th and youngest daughter and 
coheir of Major-General the Hon. George Anson, by Isabella Elizabeth 
Annabella, daughter of Cecil Weld Forester, ist Baron Forester. The 
3rd Marquis of Bristol died 7th August, 1907, when the manor passed 
to his nephew Frederick Will. Fane Hervey, M.V.O., 4th Marquis, who is 
the present lord. 

Ickworth Park is very extensive, containing with the woods about 
1,900 acres lying in Ickworth, Chevington, Little Saxham, and Hornings- 
heath. 

The ancient manor house, the site of which near the church on the 
north-east side of it, may still be traced, is said to have been burnt down 
in the time of the ist Earl, when a house in the park called The Lodge became 
the residence of the family. 

The present mansion was planned and commenced about 1792 by 
Frederick Augustus, Earl of Bristol, assisted by Francis Sandys. The 
building, which is of tile and brick stuccoed, consists of an oval centre, 
connected with wings by extensive corridors, and faced by a portico on the 
north side, the west wing being still unfinished. The whole stands upon a 
basement containing the offices. 

'Will proved 1775. "Will proved 24th Dec., 1779. 



78 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The extreme length of the buildings is 625 feet. The centre, crow in <1 
with a dome, rises 105 feet, the diameter being 120 feet north and south, 
by 106 feet east and west. 

The corridors are quadrants of circles, and intersect the centre so as 
to leave two-thirds of its largest diameter in advance on the south or 
principal front. 

The centre is composed of two orders, the Ionic and Corinthian, three- 
quarter columns supporting the entablatures. The lower entablature is 
plain, the space immediately below it being enriched with a series of subjects 
modelled in relief ; the upper entablature has its frieze filled with reliefs. 




ICKWORTH HOUSE. 



On the summit of the dome is a balustrade concealing the flues. The 
portico is supported by four columns, with a pediment of the Ionic order. 
The south front, with its noble terrace, is full of grandeur. According to 
the original design of the north front, the wings were intended to have three- 
quarter columns supporting an entablature and pediment in the centre, 
and pilasters on the sides. Chimneys being altogether excluded, the flues 
were to have been collected in a small dome rising in the centre of each roof, 
and the vestibules to the wings were to have been crowned with domes. 1 

Arms of DE ICKWORTH : Quarterly Or and Gules, on a bend Vert, 
three martlets Or. Of HERVEY : Gules, on a bend Arg. three trefoils 
slipped Vert. 



1 Gage, Thingoe, p. 304. 




LACKFORD. 79 

LACK FORD, 

MANOR was held here in the time of the Confessor, and when 
the Survey was taken by the Abbot of St. Edmunds. It 
consisted of 5 carucates of land, 14 villeins, 7 bordars, 3 
ploughteams in demesne and 4 belonging to the men, 4 
slaves, 30 acres of meadow, 2 mills, and at the time of the 
Survey 2 rouncies. There were also 9 beasts, 13 hogs, 160 
sheep, and a socman with 8 acres of land and a team of 2 
oxen. Over him the abbot held sac, soc, and commendation, and he could 
not give or sell the land without licence. There was also a church living 
with 20 acres of free land. The manor was valued at 6, and at the time 
of the Survey at 8. It was a league long and 10 quarentenes broad, and 
paid in a gelt 6d. 1 

LACKFORD MANOR. 

Lackford, Leacford, or Water-ford, was the gift of a lady to the 
monastery of St. Edmund, which held it for a manor in the time of the 
Confessor with 5 carucates of land. 

Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, by a fine levied in the tressemayns 
ot St. Michael, in 1203, granted to Benedict, son of Richard de Blakeham, 
in fee farm, the Manors of Chelsworth, Lackford, Little Fornham, Whepsted, 
and Nowton, and from this time to the time of Sir John de St. Philibert, in 
1350, the devolution of the manor is identical with that of Chelsworth, in 
Cosford Hundred. 

Additionally we may mention that Benedict de Blakeham claimed 
assize of bread and ale in Lackford in 1275, and in the same year his bailiff 
was found to have unjustly taken half an acre of land from Matilda Eweland 
for the lord's use. On this Benedict's death, in 1284, leaving Benedict his 
son and heir, a minor in ward to the Queen Mother, his manors in Lackford 
and Flempton were found to be worth yearly 60. His estate in Lackford 
consisted of a messuage and 460 acres of land, 40 acres of meadow, 30 
acres of pasture, one water corn mill, with fishing " cum ripar' pise' warren, 
and other rights," and his cottarii held with their messuages 530 acres of 
land. The Queen Mother in right of her ward brought actions in 1289 
against more than a hundred persons for depasturing in Lackford on land 
which was averred by the one party to be separate pasture, and by the other 
to belong to Icklingham, and to be their common of pasture. 

A fine was levied by Sir John de St. Philibert of his manors of Lackford 
and Flempton in 1324.' It was by John de St. Philibert and Ada his wife 
against Magister Robert de Ereswell, clerk, and Ralph, parson of Chicken- 
hall church. 

By an inquisition taken at Henowe, in Suffolk, 23rd March, 1333, on 
the decease of Sir John de St. Philibert, it was found that Robert de Ereswell, 
clerk, and Ralph, parson of Chigenhal, by fine 18 Edw. II. [1324], granted 
Lackford and Flempton to John de St. Philibert and Ada his wife, and that 
she was then seised thereof by survivorship, and John de St. Philibert was 
his son and heir, of the age of six years and upwards. 3 

Sir John de St. Philibert the son, after the death of Ada his mother, seems 
to have sold the chief part of his paternal estates, reserving rents ; and in 

"Dom. ii. 257. 3 According to another inquisition he was 

*Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. II. 14. of the age of six years at the feast 

of Epiphany. 



8o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

1350 he levied a fine of the Manors of Lackford, Flempton, and Stowe, 2OS. 
rent in Pridington, and the homage and service of Aydo de Gadsbury to 
enure to Thomas de Aspale in fee, who granted to Sir John a yearly rent of 
50 during his life. 

Thomas de Aspale was younger son of Sir Robert de Aspale by Alice, 
daughter and heir of Sir Hugh de Cressingham, which Sir Robert was 
knight of the shire of Suffolk in 1326, others of his family being representa- 
tives of the county in Parliament during the next reign. By Mirabel, 
daughter of Sir Hugh Wake, of Blysworth, brother of John, Lord Wake, 
Thomas was father of Sir John de Aspale, who in 1365, by deed written 
throughout in red letter, settled the Manors of Lackford, Flempton, Westow, 
and Overhall, in Little Bradley, upon himself and Katharine his wife, 
daughter and heir of Sir Gilbert Peche, Knt., in tail. 

There was issue of Sir John de Aspale and Katharine his wife an only 
child Mirabel, wife of William Geddyng. Katharine survived, and married 
Sir Thomas Notbeme, by whom she had a daughter Margaret, wife of John 
Hynklegh. 

In 1402 William Geddyng and Mirabel his wife granted to trustees, 
namely, John Hynklegh, Robert Clerk, and Thomas Lopham, by deed, 
which is also written throughout in red letter, the manors comprised in the 
settlement noticed of 1365, and in 1405 they levied a fine to Thomas Hethe, 
Richard Hethe, Nicholas Hethe, Richard Alrede, and Robert Pope as trus- 
tees of the Manor of Lackford, subject to the life estate of Katharine 
Notbeme, 1 whose death pccurred on Sunday next before the feast of St. 
Lawrence in the same year. 

William Geddyng left issue by Mirabel, Thomas Geddyng, his son and 
heir, who married 1st Anne, daughter of Thomas Hethe, of Hethe's Place, 
in Mildenhall, and andly Anne, daughter of Thomas Asteley, of Melton 
Constable, in Norfolk, and had issue by both marriages. 

In 1424 Thomas Geddyng levied a fine of Lackford and Flempton to 
Clement Denston, William Rokewode, and other trustees/ to whom he 
and his son, John Geddyng, released in 1445. 

In 1452 Humphrey, Duke of Buckingham, John, Earl of Worcester, 
John Astley, Esq., William Geddyng, and others, confirmed to Thomas 
Geddyng and Anne his wife, for the lives of them and the survivor, Lackford, 
Flempton, and Westowe, at a rent of 40 marks ; but which rent was not to 
be paid in his lifetime, nor while she remained his widow. 

Thomas Geddyng died in 1463, leaving Anne his widow in possession 
of this manor. John Geddyng, his son and heir, married Margery, daughter 
of Sir John Heveningham, of Heveningham, in Suffolk ; and in the 7th 
year of King Edw. IV. conveyed his Manors of Lackford, Flempton, Westow, 
Great Thurlow, Pychard's Fee and Overhall, in Little Bradley, to John, 
Duke of Suffolk, Sir John Heveningham, and other trustees. He dying 
4th February in the following year, the wardship of Robert Geddyng, his 
son and heir, was given to Anthony, Earl Rivers, and Elizabeth his wife. 
In 1474 Anne Geddyng, widow, leased to Robert Geddyng, Lackford, 
Flempton, and Westow, for two years, at a rent of 500 marks ; and 
subsequently John Astley released to him all his right in the manors. 

Robert Geddyng held his first court at Lackford on Wednesday before 
the feast of St. Edward the King, in the 3rd year of Hen. VII. In 1489 

'Feet of Fines, 7 Hen. IV. 22. 'Feet of Fines, 12 Hen. VI. 10. 



LACKFORD. 81 

he granted to Margery his mother and Philip Conyers her husband a rent 
of 20 issuing out of Lackford and Flempton. His wife was Margery, 
daughter of Geoffrey Bladwell, by Margaret, daughter and heir of Henry 
Caldebeke, by Cicely, daughter and coheir of John Hinkleigh, and 
Margaret Notbeme. There was issue of this marriage an only child 
Margery, whose wardship having been obtained by the Solicitor-General, 
Thomas Lucas, of Little Saxham, he matched the heiress with his eldest 
son Jasper. Robert Geddyng died in 1495. 

Margery Lucas died aoth September, 1515, and Jasper her husband 
the iyth Feb. 1529-30,' and both are buried in the Lucas Chapel at Little 
Saxham. Thomas Lucas, their eldest son and heir, in ward to the King, 
had livery in the year last mentioned of his mother's lands, comprising the 
Manors of Lackford, Flempton, Westow, and Thurlow, valued together at 
93. i6s., from which was to be deducted the fee farm rent payable to the 
Hospital of St. Peter. In 1530 Hen. VIII. appointed Peter Mallet his 
bailiff and keeper of warren of coneys in Lackford and Flempton. 

In 1574 Thomas Lucas and Clement, his son and heir-apparent, in 
consideration of 5,000, sold the Manors of Lackford and Flempton and 
the advowsons of the churches, to Sir Thomas Kytson the younger, 2 the 
advowson of Lackford having been acquired by Lucas from John Drury. 
of Rougham, who was a purchaser from Edward, Lord North, to whom, 
jointly with John Williams, it was granted by the Crown in 1554. 3 

Elizabeth, Lady Kytson, having become seised of Lackford under a 
settlement executed by her husband in 1598,* gave to trustees certain 
perpetual rents charged on the manor and charging it with a rent of 20 
for the benefit of the almshouses created by Sir Thomas Kytson, in 
Hengrave, limited the manor and advowson after her decease to her 
daughter and heir Mary, then Viscountess Colchester, afterwards Countess 
Rivers, for life, with remainder to her daughter and coheir Penelope, 
married to Sir John Gage. 

In 1632 Sir John Gage, and Lady Penelope his wife settled this 
property in remainder expectant upon the decease of the survivor of them, 
on their eldest son, Sir Thomas Gage, of Firle, in strict settlement, whose 
great-grandson and heir, Sir William Gage, of Firle, sold the manor and 
advowson of Lackford in 1717 to Philip Holman. From him they were 
purchased in 1760 by Sir Charles Egleton as executor of the will of Samuel 
Kent, by deeds dated 24th and 25th April, 1760. Gage inaccurately says 
the purchase was made by Samuel Kent the son. He was the eldest son 
of Samuel Kent, who died in 1759, and probably had the beneficial interest 
under the will of his father. He married Sarah, daughter of - - Timewell, 
widow of John Perkins, of Camberwell, and dying nth Feb. 1762, without 
issue, 5 the manor passed to his brother and heir, Thomas Kent, who, dying 
without issue 15 th May, 1766, the manor passed to his sister and heir 
Sarah, married to Sir Charles Egleton, Knt., Sheriff of London, in 1743. 
Sir Charles died 25th April, 1769," and Sarah his widow 4th Dec. 1790, aged 
84, when the manor passed to her son and heir, Sir Charles Egleton, who under 

1 1.P.M., 28 Hen. VIII. 4 Deeds, 17* Sept. 1622 ; 26th Nov. 1625. 

2 Fines, Thomas Lucas and Clement Lucas 5 Will I4th Jan. 1748, Pr. P.C.C. 3rd March, 

and others, 16 Eliz. Thomas Kytson 1762. 

and Thomas Lucas and others, 6 Will 6th July, 1765, Codicils loth Sept. 

Hil. 17 Eliz. 1766, 8th July, 1768, proved P.C.C. 

3 Gage, Thingoe, pp. 49, 50. i8th May, 1769. 

L 



82 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

a Royal licence assumed the name and arms of Kent in pursuance of the 
will of his maternal grandfather, and was created a baronet 3rd Aug. 1782. 
Sir Charles was member for Thetford in the Parliament of 1784. He married 
2Oth May, 1771, Mary, daughter and coheir of Josiah Wordsworth, of 
Wordsworth, in the County of York, and dying 4th March, 1811,' the manor 
went to his son and heir, Sir Charles Egleton Kent, Bart., who married, 7th 
March, 1818, Lady Sophia Margaret Lygon, daughter of William, ist Earl 
of Beauchamp, 1 and dying 5th Dec. 1834,' the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Sir William Charles Egleton Kent, Bart., 4 who died unmarried 8th 
April, 1848, and was buried at Fulham the I5th of the same month. The 
manor passed to the last Baronet's two surviving sisters and coheirs, Sarah 
Ann, married at Grantham, 4th March, 1807, to Leonard Walbanke Childers, 
and Louisa Elizabeth, married at Syston, co. Lincoln, 3rd Jan. 1820, to John 
Litchford, afterwards Sir John Litchford. Mrs. Childers and Mrs. Litchford 
held in 1855, but by 1885 the manor had passed to the Rev. James Richard 
Holden, and is now the lordship of the Rev. John Shuttleworth Holden. 

Arms of BLAKEHAM : Azure, two bars between twelve crosslets, Or. 
Of KENT : Gules, three cinquefoils, Ermine. Of LUCAS : Argent, a fesse 
between six annulets, Gules. 



1 Will proved 6th Aug. 1811, P.C.C. 3 He was buried at Fulham nth Dec. 1834. 

* She was buried at Fulham, 22nd Nov. ' ? Baptised Charles William at St. George's, 
1834. Hanover Square, i6th Feb. 1819. 




NOWTON. 83 

NOWTON. 

MANOR was held here in the time of the Confessor and 
also at the time of the Survey by the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
and consisted of 4 carucates of land, 10 villeins, 10 bordars^ 
4 ploughteams in demesne and 4 belonging to the men. 
Also 4 slaves, 4 acres of meadow, wood to maintain 5 hogs, 
a mill, and, at the time of the Survey, 4 rouncies. Also 
18 beasts, 23 hogs, 80 sheep, 3 hives of bees, and 10 socmen, 
with half a carucate of land, 2 ploughteams, and 4 acres of meadow. Over 
these men the abbot had sac, soc, commendation, and all customs, and 
they could not give or sell the land without his licence. There was also 
a church living with 8 acres of free land. The manor was formerly valued 
at 5, which value was doubled at the time of the Survey. It was 10 
quarentenes long and 6 broad, and paid in a gelt 6d.' 

NOWTON MANOR. 

Theodred, Bishop of the East Angles, gave the monks of St. Edmund 
his lands in Nowton. In the time of the Confessor the abbot held Nowton 
written in Domesday Book Neotun, the new town, as a manor of 4 carucates 
of land ; and 10 socmen had half a carucate and 4 acres of meadow. 

Adelo held of Abbot Baldwin, as appears 2 by his books of fees, 2 
carucates, 3 villeins, and 2 bordars, in Nowton ; and it is presumed that the 
estate of Adelo escheated to the lord, for Baldwin appropriated Nowton 
to supply certain classes of monks with different articles of apparel. In 
his deed of appropriation the abbot speaks of this manor as part of the 
property which he acquired from King William. 

The Manor of Nowton was comprised hi the lease granted in 1203 
by Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, to Benedict de Blakeham. The 
tenant was to render twice a year to the cellarist 16 coombs of malt oats 
and 4^ coombs of barley grout, in the measure used in St. Edmunds court, 
and 24 coombs of wheat, at the option of the cellarist according to the 
same measure or in the ancient accustomed measure of Cokefield, and 
for the kitchen 385. 8d. and one seme (that is to say, 8 bushels) of peas 
and beans, and to find for one week six servants at his own cost in the brew- 
house, and fuel sufficient for brewing, besides paying i%d. to the brewer 
at each rent-day, and id. to the baker ; and to provide in the bakehouse 
at each rent 700 furze, or 14 loads of straw or stubble, or underwood, and 
at St. Edmunds rent, one seme and a half of oat malt, half a seme of barley 
grout, and half a seme of wheat, a quarter of a calf, and a pig, i goose, 
and 5 hens, besides paying i$d. to the brewer ; and the tenant was to 
have at each rent-day liveries from the kitchen. 

In 1545 Henry Payne, on payment of 647. i8s. 2d., received from the 
Crown a grant in fee 3 of the Manor of Nowton, the advowson of the church, 
and the hereditaments in Nowton belonging to the dissolved monastery 
of St. Edmund. It appears from the particulars of Nowton in the Aug- 
mentation Office, that the site of the manor was in lease to William Sterne 
for 20 years, and the yearly receipts of the property were 25. 135. gd. 4 

1 Dom. ii. 357. 4 D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 249 ; Gage, Thingoe, 

"Regist. Migr. fol. 133 v. p. 487-9- 

3 The grant will be found on the Originalia 
Rolls, 37 Hen. VIII. Rot. 39. 



8 4 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Henry Payne was the son of \Yilliam Payne, of Hengrave, who was in 
the service of Edward Stafford, Duke of Buckingham, as bailiff of his 
Manor of Hengrave, by Margery, daughter of Thomas Ash, of Thurlow. 
This William was the son of Edmund Payne by Elizabeth his wife, daughter 
of Robert Walton, which Edmund was the 3rd son of Sir Thomas Payne, 
of Market Bosworth, co. Leicester, Knt., and Margaret his wife, daughter 
of Sir Thomas Pulteney, of Misterton, co. Leicester, ancestor of William, 
Earl of Bath, the celebrated statesman. 

By a deed dated I3th June, 1568, Henry Payne, the purchaser of the 
manor, enfeoffed trustees with the same and lands in the parish (except 
certain closes purchased of Sir William Drury and others) to the use of 
himself for life with remainder subject to a term of 21 years to his brother 
Anthony for life, with remainder to the use of John Payne, son and heir- 
apparent of the said Anthony in tail male, with remainder successively 
to Thomas and William, brothers of the said John, in tail male, with 
remainder to Edward Payne, brother of the said Henry Payne, in tail 
male, with remainder to the right heirs of the said Anthony. On the same 
day all the tenants of the same lands attorned to the feoffees of the site 
of the said manor called Nowton Hall. The lands were then held by the 
service of one knight's fee and the payment of 46$. 10^., and was worth 
after all outgoings 6. 135. 4^. Henry Payne made his will i4th June, 
1568,' and died without issue 25th June, 1568, being buried on the following 
day in the parish church of Nowton. 

Anthony Payne, on whom the manor was settled by his brother Henry, 
married Martha, daughter of Robert Castell, of Hatley, co. Bedford, and 
died seised of the manor (Gage says 3rd March, 1606, Davy says 5th 
Jan. 1606),* leaving his grandson Anthony, eldest son of John Payne 
(by Frances his wife, daughter of Robert Spring, of Icklingham), who had 
died in his father's lifetime and been buried at Nowton (Gage says 2Oth 
Oct. 1597, Davy says 28th Nov. 1597), hi s heir-at-law. This grandson, 
Anthony Payne, married Alice, daughter of William Playters, of Sotterly, 
and in 1607, the year before his death, sold 3 the manor and advowson for 
3,000 to William Payne, of Bernham, probably his cousin or uncle, who 
held his first court here 6th Oct. 1609, and his last 26th Jan. 1621, after 
which this property was purchased by Sir Daniel de Ligne, of Harlaxton, 
in Lincolnshire, who held his first court here on Tuesday, 27th Sept. 1625.' 

Taking refuge in England on account, as it is said, of religious persecu- 
tion, he received letters of denization in 1613, and the honour of knighthood 
was conferred upon him by King James, at Oatlands, 4th Feb. 1620. 



1 Proved in the Prerogative Court at 
Canterbury, 2nd Feb. 1568-9. 

'I. P.M., 5 Jas. I. capta apud Woodbridge 
and Nov. The will of Anthony 
Payne, dated i6th February, 1606, 
was proved in the Archdeaconry of 
Sudbury, 2oth April following. He 
ordered his body to be buried in the 
chancel of Nowton church near his 
late wife. He gave his house at 
St. Edmundsbury to his son William 
Payne, reserving power for the 
testator's daughter Anne, wife of 



Edward Weston, gentleman, to 
reside there for two years after his 
decease ; and after various legacies 
gave the residue of his estate to his 
son, William Payne, whom he 
appointed sole executor. (Liber. 
Strutt, fol. 104 v.) 

'Licence of Alienation from the Crown i 
Sept. 6th Jas. I. and bargain and 
sale, dated last day of Jan. (6 
James I. Rot. Pat.) 

4 See Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, p. 492. 



NOWTON. 85 

In 1627 he was naturalised by Act of Parliament, 1 and served the 
office of Sheriff of Lincolnshire in 1631. By Elizabeth, daughter of Sir 
Erasmus de la Fontaine, of Kirby Belerand, Belrand Stonesley, in Leicester- 
shire, he had a numerous issue, and dying 2oth March, 1656, was buried 
23rd of the same month under an altar-tomb on the south side of the 
chancel of Harlaxton church. 

Sir Erasmus de la Fontaine and William de Ligne, one of the younger 
sons of Sir Daniel, trustees for sale of this property, under a settlement 
executed by him, held a court here isth Dec. 1657, and shortly afterwards 
sold Nowton to the Earl of St. Albans/ from whom it descended with the 
Jermyn inheritance to Frederick William, 5th Earl and ist Marquis of 
Bristol, in the same course as the Manor of Rushbrook, in Thedwestry 
Hundred, and Ickworth, in this Hundred. 

In 1832 Orbell Ray Oakes, son of James Oakes, of Bury St. Edmunds, 
banker, J.P., D.L., purchased from the Marquis of Bristol the Manor of 
Nowton and part of the lands. The site of Nowton Hall, now converted 
into a farmhouse, continues to be the property of the Marquis, together 
with the advowson of the church of Nowton. The custom of Borough 
English prevails in this manor. 3 

Orbell Ray Oakes, of Nowton Court, was the eldest son of the banker, 
James Oakes, and Elizabeth his wife, eldest daughter of Christopher 
Adamson, of Wereham, co. Norfolk, and married Elizabeth Frances, 
3rd daughter of John Plamplin, of Chadacre Hall, Shimpling, by Framces 
Catherine, daughter of the Hon. and Rev. Henry Hervey, 4th son of the 
ist Earl of Bristol, by Catherine, daughter of Sir Thomas Aston, 3rd Bart., 
of Aston Hall, Cheshire. Orbell Ray Oakes died 2Qth July, 1837, and was 
buried at Nowton, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Henry James 
Oakes, M.A., J.P., D.L., also an alderman of Bury St. Edmunds, Mayor 
in 1844, and High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1847. He married 3rd Jan. 1820, 
Maria Anne, daughter of the Rev. Robert Porteus, rector of Wickham 
Bishops, co. Essex, great-nephew of Dr. Beilby Porteus, Bishop of London, 
and dying gth September, 1875, was buried at Nowton, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, James Henry Porteus Oakes, of Nowton Court, 
M.A., J.P. and D.L., M.P. for Bury St. Edmunds 1852-1857. He died 
22nd Jan. igoi, unmarried, and the manor passed to his.nephew, Lieut.-Col. 
Orbell Henry Oakes, son of his brother, Orbell Plamplin Oakes, who had died 
in 1881, by Julia his wife, daughter of Thomas Evans, of Lyminster, co. 
Sussex. Col. Oakes married in 1877 Laura Elizabeth Josephine, daughter 
of Captain George Clifton, R.N., Governor of Portland Convict Prison, 
and had, with other issue, a son, Henry James Lionel Oakes, who served 
in South Africa, where he was wounded. Lieut.-Col. Orbell Henry Oakes 
is the present lord of the manor. 

came to live and inhabit in this your 
Majesties Kingdom of England, 
where he hath lived for the space 
of 15 years or thereabouts, and 
obtained letters of denization under 
the Great Seal of England, dated 
27th January, n James I." 

2 Henry, Earl of St. Albans, and Thos. 
Jermyn held their first court for 
Nowton on the gth March, 1674 
(Rot. Cur.) 

'Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, p. 493-4- 



'The draft of the Act of Naturalisation, 
among the family papers at Har- 
laxton, sets forth, " That whereas 
yr. said subject was born at Frank- 
fort, in parts beyond the seas, of 
Dutch parents, and for the pro- 
fession of the true religion estab- 
lished in this your Majesties King- 
dom of England, wherein he hath 
been brought up from his infancy, 
hath been driven to forsake his own 
country. And whereas your subject 



86 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Arms of PAYNE : Argent on a fesse engrailed, Gules, between three 
martlets Sable, as many mascles, Or : a bordure engrailed of the second 
besante. Of OAKES : Sable on a fesse engrailed between six slips of oak, 
fructed Or, three oak leaves Vert. 




REDE. 87 

REDE. 

HERE were several holdings in this place at the time of the 
Survey. One was that of Henry held of the abbot, and 
consisted of a socman with half a carucate of land, 4 bordars, 
a slave, a ploughteam, 3 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient 
to maintain 3 hogs. Over the socman the abbot had sac, 
soc, and commendation, and the man could not give or sell 
the land without the abbot's licence. The value was 
formerly 2os., increased to double at the time of the Survey.' 

The second estate was held of the abbot by Berard, and consisted of 
seven freemen with half a carucate and 50 acres of land, 2 ploughteams, 
3 acres of meadow, wood sufficient to maintain 6 hogs. These men could 
give and sell their lands, the sac, soc, and commendation and service 
remaining under the abbot. The value was 305. It was 8 quarentenes 
long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt yd. Others had holdings here. 2 

The Abbot of Ely had a small holding in this place at the time of the 
Survey, consisting of 20 acres in demesne, 4 bordars, 2 acres of meadow, 
and half a ploughteam, the soc and sac belonging to the abbot. The 
value was 45. 3 

Another holding here was that of Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, and 
formerly that of seven freemen under Wisgar, with soc and sac, but they 
could sell. It consisted of a carucate of land, 6 bordars, 3 ploughteams 
(reduced to I J teams at the time of the Survey), 4 acres of meadow, enough 
wood to support 3 hogs. The value was 305. (increased to 405. at the 
time of the Survey). There was also a church living with 12 acres of free 
land. 4 

The only other holding was amongst the possessions of Suane, of 
Essex, and consisted of a socman, with 20 acres, a bordar, half a ploughteam, 
and an acre of meadow valued at 55. The soc belonged to the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds. 5 

MANOR OF REDE HALL. 

In the time of Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, the heir of Roger 
de Beauchamp held half a knight's fee here of Gilbert fitz Ralph, and he 
of the abbot. Ralph, son of Brian, held 3 acres of land of Gilbert, and 
they were of his knight's fee. 6 The Beauchamps were of the house of 
Stephen de Beauchamp, Sheriff of Essex, in 1169. John de Beauchamp 
in 1200 had the inheritance of the above-named Roger de Beauchamp/ 
and Alberic, Earl of Oxford, was then the mesne lord in place of Gilbert 
fitz Ralph. 

The Beauchamp lands in Rede passed to Simon fitz Richard, of Dun- 
mow, under a fine levied in 1253 by Henry de Beauchamp of a messuage 
and 2 carucates of land in Rede, and constituted the Manor of Rede Hall. 

In 1257 tne second Simon fitz Richard leased this manor to Master 
William de Clare, Archdeacon of Sudbury, for 20 years. He married 
Nichola, daughter and coheir of Sir William de Bovile, who afterwards 
married Thomas de Hendringham, and was a widow in 1341. In 1307 
a fine was levied of the manor by Amicia, wife of Richard fitz Simon, 
against Simon fitz Richard and Isabella his wife. 8 

'Dom. ii. 358. s Dom. ii. 401. 

2 Dom. ii. 358. "Gage, Thingoe, p. 367. 

3 Dom. ii. 3816. 7 Chron. Jocelin, cited Gage, Thingoe, 367. 

4 Dom. ii. 3916. "Feet of Fines, i Edw. II. 20. 



88 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1314 Simon fitz Richard was, on the death of Gilbert, Earl of 
Gloucester, found to hold 12^ knights' fees of the Honor of Clare. 

In 1286 Simon fitz Richard is stated to be chief lord of Rede, and to 
have held 220 acres of land, 9 acres of meadow, 6 acres of pasture, 30 acres 
of wood, warren, and other rights of John de Beauchamp for half a knight's 
fee, and he of the Earl of Oxford, and the Earl of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
doing suit to the Hundred every three weeks, and paying yearly to the 
bailiff 6d., and for castleward at Norwich every twenty weeks i^d. He was 
succeeded in the lordship of this place by his son and heir, Richard fitz 
Simon, who married Ada, daughter of Sir John de Bottetourt, and widow 
of John de Sancto Philberto. Richard fitz Simon seems to have sold to Sir 
Hugh de Saxham, son of Robert de Saxham, who certainly held the lordship 
in 1346. 

The return for the aid this year runs : " De Hugone de Saxham ten 
in Rede dimit' feod',de comite Oxon' quod Ric'us fil' Simonis quondam 
tenuit in eadem villa de eodem comite xxs." 

Hugh married Rosia,and died about 1350 without issue, when the manor 
passed to his brother and heir, Thomas de Saxham, then parson of Troston, 
who had been married before taking orders. He, in 1350, settled the manor, 
together with 3 carucates of land in Troston, Honington, Chedburgh, 
Westley, Little Saxham, Little Horningsheath, Great Livermere, and Forn- 
ham All Saints, upon Joan, widow of his eldest son Robert, deceased, for 
life, with remainder to Richard de Wikes and Henry de Weting, clerks, for 
their lives, with the ultimate remainder to himself in fee. 1 This ultimate 
remainder he is said to have sold to Sir J ohn Cavendish and others . Thomas dc 
Saxham, the settlor, by his will dated on Monday, the Feast of St. Dunstan, 
1365, ordered his body to be buried in the churchyard of the monastery 
of St. Edmund if he died within the Four Crosses, other wise to be buried 
in the parish church of Troston. He bequeathed to the high altar of the 
church of Troston for tithes forgotten 2os. ; to the high altar of Saxham ios., 
and to the high altar of Cley in Norfolk, ios. He willed that on the evening 
of his decease 13 wax lights, each weighing a pound at most, should be placed 
round his body, that five should be reserved for the 7th day and 3oth day 
after his death, and that when the sacrist of Bury or the rector of Troston 
had taken what of right belonged to them, the rest of the wax lights should 
be burnt at the altar during mass. And the testator further willed that 
with 100 payable for the Manor of Rede by John Cavendish and John 
Clerk, of Somerton, and others, together with 40 received for the same 
manor, and paid to the prior and convent of St. Edmund, by his son, Thomas 
de Saxham, a monk there, a remembrance should be had for him on the day 
of his anniversary, and that so long as the money lasted 20 marks should 
be distributed among the monks, and in the nth year after his decease 10 
marks. And he ordered that every poor person attending his funeral should 
have one loaf, price id. And he gave to Agnes, daughter of his son Robert, 
26. 135. 4^. for her marriage. And he directed that his executors, 
during the minority of John, son and heir of his son Robert, should receive 
the rents of his lands in Troston and Little Saxham to fulfil his will, and the 
profits of his Manor of Cley for eight years be disposed of as therein men- 
tioned, appointing Robert Terevald, clerk, William le Neve, clerk, and 
William Morle, rector of Troston, executors. 1 

Probably Sir John Cavendish, Chief Justice of England was merely 
a trustee of the manor, for we find that John de Saxham, the grandson of 

1 Feet of Fines, 24 Edw. III. 7. 'Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, p. 372-3. 



REDE. 89 

Thomas the settlor, held the manor in due course, and married Margaret, 
daughter of Richard Houldich, of Didlington, co. Norfolk. He died, 
however, without issue, in 1384. The manor was held by Felice Fraunceys 
in 1428, and he continued to hold the same until 1437. Gage says that 
Alexander Cressener 1 seems subsequently to have held it until it became the 
property of Roger Drury, of Hawstead. 

Roger Drury died shortly after acquiring the manor, seised of it, as 
stated, by Gage, in 1499, and from this time to the death of Sir Robert 
Drury, in 1615, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Hawstead, in this Hundred. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Robert 
Drury, who died 2nd March, 1534, leaving Sir William his son and heir/ 
and in 1597 Robert Drury is mentioned as the holder in the Rawlinson MSS. 3 
We meet, however, with a fine levied of the manor and also of that of Pycard's, 
in 1540, by Henry Payne, senior, against Anna Grey, widow, and others. 4 

Upon the partition of the Drury estates in 1616 the manors of Rede 
or Rede Hall and Picard's, in Rede, were allotted, amongst other heredita- 
ments, to William, then Lord Burleigh, afterwards Earl of Exeter, and 
Elizabeth his wife and her heirs, and appears to have devolved at her decease 
upon her grandson, Charles, Viscount Andover, eldest son of the Earl of 
Berkshire. 

The property was subsequently severed into parcels, and the manor 
was acquired by John Gipps, who married Mary, daughter of David 
Davison, of London, and included it in a settlement in 1693. John Gipps 
and his son, Sir Richard Gipps, sold the manor to Richard Phillips, of 
Ipswich, who sold to Phillips Coleman, of Ipswich, who sold in 1772 to 
Robert Sutton, of Bury St. Edmunds, surgeon, in trust for himself and one 
Branthwaite Green, by conveyance dated 9th and loth October, 1772. 
Robert Sutton sold his interest to Branthwaite Green by deeds dated gth 
and loth October, 1775, and Branthwaite Green by his will dated 23rd 
February, 1809, proved at London 2Oth June, 1811, devised the manor to 
his sister and sole heir, Mary Green, who in 1812 sold the same to Frederick 
William, 5th Earl of Bristol, and ist Marquis, from which time the manor 
has descended in the same course as the Manor of Ickworth, in this Hundred. 



MANOR OF PICARD al. PICKARD'S al. CRESSENER'S. 

William de Rede held half a knight's fee of Gilbert de Bailiol, and the 
monks of Stoke by Clare held of him 20 acres. Of these lands or parts of 
them Mathew de Thelnetham, Lord of Great Livermere, and the Earl of 
Oxford, were the mesne lords, and out of them the Manor of Picards was 
formed. Both the lands of William de Rede and of the priory of Stoke 
formed part of the Honor of Clare. 

Mr. Gage seems to think that the ancestors of William de Rede were 
the original tenants under Richard fitz Gilbert. The inheritance of William 
de Rede became divided, and part descended to Nicholas de Rede and the 
other part to the heirs of Roger de Rede and others, and half a fee ultimately 

'See Picard Manor, in Rede. 3 Rawl. B. 319. 

2 I.P.M., 27 Hen. VIII. 24. 4 Fine, Trin. 32 Hen. VIII: 

M 



90 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

vested in John Pykard, from whom the Manor of Picards derived its name.' 
He had a grant of free warren in his demesne lands of Rede in 1305.' 

In 1346 the manor was vested in Nicholas Pykard. Nearly a century 
later the lands of Nicholas Pykard, in Rede, became vested in Walter 
Cressener, as we learn from an aid levied in 1428, and nine years later the 
manor had passed to Robert Cressener, and from him it passed to Alexander, 1 
and from him to his son and heir, Thomas Cressener, who was lord in 1501. 
From Thomas the manor passed to his son, John Cressener, when it devolved 
on his son and heir, John Cressener, who in 1538 sold the manor to Sir 
William Drury, Knt. 4 Sir Wm. Drury died in 1589, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert Drury, who died in 1615. The manor 
was included in the partition of the Drury estates in 1616, referred to in 
the account of the Manor of Rede Hall, and was allotted with it to William, 
then Lord Burleigh, afterwards Earl of Exeter, and Elizabeth his wife and 
her heirs, and appears to have devolved like the main manor upon her 
grandson Charles, Viscount Andover. It was, however, sold to Lady Ann 
Ingram by deed dated I4th Dec. 1686, for 2,000, but before 1714 was 
acquired by John, 1st Earl of Bristol, for in this year he settled it in jointure 
with other lands upon Elizabeth his countess, and it has descended since 
like the Manor of Ickworth, in this Hundred. 

Descent of the Manor of " Reedhall," and lands called " Pykards " 
in 1597, will be found in the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian. 5 

Arms of CRESSENER : Argent, on a bend engrailed, three crosslets 
fitche, Or. 4 



'Gage, Thingoe, p. 369. 4 Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. 

Chart. Rolls, 33 Edw. I. 62. 5 Rawl. B. 319. 

'As to the Cresseners see Manor of Cres- 'Differing, apparently, from arms of 
seners, Hawkedon, in Risbridge Cresseners of Hawkedon, in Ris- 

Hundred. bridge Hundred. 




RISBY. 9I 

RISBY. 

I MANOR was held here in the time of the Confessor, and also 
when the Survey was taken, by the Abbot of St. Edmunds. 
It consisted of 2 carucates of land, 4 villeins, 2 borders, 2 
ploughteams in demesne and i belonging to the men, 3 slaves, 
an acre of meadow, 12 beasts, 30 hogs, 90 sheep, and 32' 
goats. At the time of the Survey there were 4 ploughteams 
in demesne, i slave, and an additional 3 rouncies. 
There were also 7 socmen having i carucates of land, a bordar a 
slave, and 3 ploughteams. Over these men the abbot had soc, sac, com- 
mendation, and all customs. They could not give or sell the land without 
his leave, and they had also to bring their sheep to the abbot's fold, with 
the exception of one who had a fold for himself. 1 

Also amongst the Abbot of St. Edmunds' possessions was a carucate 
of land given by a freeman, which Norman held of the abbot at the time 
of the Survey. Also 4 bordars, a slave, a ploughteam, and an acre of 
meadow, and he might give or sell the land, the sac, soc, and commendation 
remaining in the abbot's possession. The value was i os. And there was 
also a church living with 24 acres of free land. The manor (not including 
the freeman) was valued at 4 (increased to 6 at the time of the Survey). 
It was 9 quarentenes long and 8 broad, and paid in a gelt 20^. Others had 
holdings here. 2 

The only other holding in this place was that of Ulmar the thane, and 
consisted of 2 carucates of land under Stigand, 6 bordars, 4 slaves, 2 plough- 
teams, 2 acres of meadow, and half a mill, valued at 6os. When the Survey 
was taken this estate was held by Roger de Poictou ; there were only 3 
bordars, no slaves, and i ploughteam, and the value was reduced to 2os. 3 

MANOR OF RISBY al. RISBY SEXTENS al. WESTLEY. 

Risby was a Leet of itself, and named in the division of the Hundred 
next after the Leet of Barrow, Lackford, and Flempton. 4 The manor was 
bestowed upon the monks of St. Edmund by Edward the Confessor. The 
manor and advowson of Risby, with the lands in this place of the monastery 
at the time of its dissolution, were purchased from the Crown by Sir Thomas 
Kytson. 5 

Particulars for this grant will be found in the Record Office, 6 and the 
grant itself to Sir Thomas and Margaret his wife is entered on the Originalia 
Rolls in I539- 7 

The grant included not only this manor but the Manors of Chevington, 
Hargrave, Downham, Fornham All Saints, St. Genevieve and St. Martin, 
and the parish of Chevington, lately belonging to the monastery of Bury, 
and the consideration paid by Sir Thomas Kytson was 3,710. and 20^. 
The date of the conveyance was 25th March, I540. 8 

From this time the manor devolved in the same course as the Manor 
of Hengrave, in this Hundred, and is now vested in John Wood, M.P., of 

'Dom. ii. 3566. 5 Pat. Rolls, 31 Hen. VIII. pt. iv. 25th 

'Dora, ii. 3566. March. See Manor of Hengrave, 

3 Dom. ii. 3496. in this Hundred. 

4 Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, 69. 6 3i Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 226. 

"> Originalia, 31 Hen. VIII. 2 Pars. Rot. 312. 

8 14 Rep. Hist. Com.- pt. viii. 138. 



92 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Hengrave Hall. The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of 
Sir Thomas Kytson, who died nth Sept. 1540, leaving Thomas his son 
and heir, 1 who in 1579 was called upon to show title to the manor.' 

An extent of the manor will be found amongst the Harleian MSS. in 
the British Museum. 1 

The particulars of the manor in 1768 were as follows : s. d. 
I. A messuage or tenement and farm called Risby Hall Farm 

in the parish of Risby rented by Robert Nunns at . . 100 o o 
2. A messuage or tenement and farm called Charmain's Farm 

in the parish of Risby, rented by Thomas Danby at . . 105 o o 
3. A messuage or tenement and farm called Queyes Farm in 

the parish of Risby, rented by Walter Orbel at . . 85 o o 
4. A Wood called the Hide, estimated about 100 acres with a 

yearly fell of Timber at i6s. per acre . . . . . . 80 o o 

5. A Grove called Littlewood, containing 5 acres with a Fell of 

Timber . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500 

6. The Quit Rents of the Manor of Risby . . . . . . 330 

7. Profits of Risby Courts, one year with another . . . . 3 3 o 

8. A Piece of ground called Warren Hill Pin, containing 3 

acres, 3 roods, i pole, in the parish of Flampton, 

then in Sir Thomas Gage's own hands, estimated to be 

worth about 3 a year . . . . . . . . 300 



384 6 o 
MANOR OF CHARMANS. 

This manor was anciently held by the De Risby family. Wulfric de 
Risby is a witness to Edric de Latimer's charter of Fornham in 1112, and 
in 1197 Norman Fitz Norman acknowledged the service of half a knight's 
fee to be due to Abbot Sampson in respect of the land of his ancestor. 
Norman de Risby and his brother, Sir William de Risby, were living in 
1200. It is related by Jocelin that the two knights, William and Norman 
de Risby, being in mercy in the abbot's court, Sampson, the abbot, publicly 
addressing them said, that he, when a cloistered monk, having been sent 
to Durham on the affairs of the monastery, and being overtaken by night 
as he returned home through Risby , had sought hospitality from Sir Norman, 
which was refused ; but that having gone to the house of Sir William, he 
had received him honourably , therefoie the one he adjudged to pay the 
full fine of 2os. and to the other his fine was remitted with thanks. 4 

Norman de Risby was succeeded by his son and heir, Walter de Risby, 
who sold the manor to Sir Robert Hovel, Knt., and then parted with the 
homage and service of the purchaser to Edmund, Abbot of St. Edmunds. 
The interest acquired by Sir Robert Hovel from Walter de Risby was half 
a knight's fee. 

Sir Robert Hovel and Margaret his wife leased the manor to Sir Walter 
Fitz Bernard, Knt., who made a lease to the priory and convent of St. 
Edmund for seven years from the Feast of St. Michael, 1259. The last- 
mentioned lease was confirmed by Sir Robert Hovel and Margery his wife. 5 

1 1.P.M., 32 Hen. VIII. 63. 5 See Manor of VVeston Market, in Black- 

* Memoranda Rolls, 21 Eliz. Rec. Rot. 35. bourn Hundred, and Wyverston 

J Harl. 638. Manor, in Hartismere Hundred. 
4 Gage, Thingoe, p. 71. 



RISBY. 93 

A covenant concerning the manor called " Risby Manor" between the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds and Sir Robert de Hovel, in 1261, will be found 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum. 1 

In 1286 the holding in Risby of Sir Robert Hovel (not the same Sir 
Robert as last but a 2nd Sir Robert who died this year) of the abbot was a 
messuage and 180 acres of land by the service of half a knight's fee, Hundred 
suit, 15^. rent to the bailiff, and i8d. rent for castleward every 20 weeks. 
On his death Alianore his widow succeeded, and held until her death in 1300. 
In 1356 Robert, son of Robert Hovel, of Wyverston, granted to Richard 
Charman, of Bury St. Edmunds, draper, the reversion of lands in Risby, 
which were held in dower by Agnes, late wife of Sir Hugh Hovel, and all 
the estate of Robert Hovel in Risby, Westley, Cavenham, Lackford, and 
Little Saxham. Agnes joined in the grant to release her interest ; and in 
1358 William, brother of Sir John Risby, Knt., quit claimed to Richard 
Charman all right to the lands of Sir Hugh Hovel in Risby. This Richard 
Charman also acquired lands in Risby from the Hemenhales, and the 
properties of the Hovels and Hemenhales thus acquired constituted, accord- 
ing to Gage, the Manor of Charman. This, however, could -not have been 
the case, as a manor could not have been constituted at that date ; but it 
is quite possible that what was acquired from the Hemenhales constituted 
the Manor of Coldhall, which, by Davy, is regarded as one with the Manor 
of Charmans. Richard Charman was an alderman of Bury St. Edmunds, 
ard died in 1379, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Richard 
Charman, though Gage merely maintains the gift to him of the tenement 
and 160 acres formerly of Robert de Hemenhale, in Risby. 

Richard married twice ist a wife named Alicia, and 2ndly one named 
Joan, and died in 1390, having settled his lands in Risby upon William his 
son in tail mail, remainder to Catharine, daughter of William, remainder to 
the testator's sisters, Catharine, Alice, Joan, and Blanche successively in 
tail. William died in 1430 and John Charman, citizen and fishmonger of 
London, his son and heir, died without issue. Catharine his sister married 
Richard, son of Geoffrey Manynfield, who in 1453 settled Charman's Manor 
on his daughter Jane and William Skarlet her husband, remainder to their 
son William in tail, who died without issue, when the manor passed to his 
sister Catharine, married to William Child, and from her to her son and 
heir, William Child, who in 1507 sold the manor to Thomas Lucas, of Little 
Saxham, who in 1525 conveyed it to Sir Thomas Jermyn, of Rushbrook, 
whose son, Thomas Jermyn, and Ann his mother, sold to Sir Thomas 
Kytson, the younger. 

From this time to the present the manor has devolved in the same course 
as the main Manor of Risby. Gage says : " The site of Charman's Manor 
containing 5 acres, lay between the road called the Market-way on the south 
and the Manor of Risby on the north. It abutted west on Queye's Pasture, 
and east upon the common- way."* This could hardly have been the case 
in early days. We have seen that in 1768 the manor was absorbed in the 
main Manor of Risby. 

Arms of HOVEL : Sable a cross Or. Of RISBY : Gules, on a bend 
Argent, three crosslets Sable. 

MANOR OF COLD HALL. 

This manor belonged to Ralph le Bretun, who held of Robert de 
Gresle as parcel of the Honor of Lancaster, and came to Robert le Bretun. 3 

'Add. Ch. 5488. T. de N. 391. 

*Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, 76. 



94 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1261 there is a finding that the Abbot of Bury and this Robert le 
Bretun have not wrongfully disseised Thomas Passelewe, rector of Barrow, 
of a common of pasture in Risby, for the same was not appurtenant to the 
latter's free tenement in Barrow as alleged ;' and on the Patent Rolls in 
1275 we meet with notice of an action by Walter de Prydinton against 
Mabel, daughter of Thomas le Bretun, and others, touching a tenement 
in Risby. 1 

The manor subsequently passed to Walkelyn de Queye who, we find, 
in 1297, held in right of Maud his wife of the heirs of Robert deGresle. In 
1309 the manor was settled upon Edmund, son of Walkelyn de Queye and 
Maud his wife in tail. It subsequently passed to John de Rumburgh, and 
later to the Risbys, probably vesting in Walter de Risby, son of John de 
Risby, who married Agnes, subsequently the wife of John Hacke, and 
passed to his son, Philip de Risby, 3 who married Joan de Hethe of Little 
Saxham, and from him to his son and heir, Thomas de Risby, rector of 
Wratting Parva. 

In 1375 this Thomas de Risby settled the manor, which Amy or Amicia 
his mother, widow of Philip de Risby, and then the wife of John de Hethe, 
held in dower, upon his half-brothers Robert, John, and Thomas de Hethe 
successively in tail, and two years later he gave to John de Hethe and Amy 
his wife in tail the lands which Agnes Hacke, his grandmother, held for her 
life. In 1383 the said Thomas de Risby settled upon the said John and 
Amy his wife for their lives the lands in Risby which he had of the gift of 
John de Saxham, with remainder to Robert de Hethe and Margaret his 
wife, daughter of Edward Durward, in tail. 

Thomas de Risby died about 1383,* and exactly 100 years later upon 
a partition in 1483, of the lands of Alice Fitz Lewis and Margaret Darcy, 
great-granddaughters and heirs of Thomas Hethe, of Hengrave, son and 
heir of Robert de Hethe and Margaret his wife, this manor was allotted to 
Margaret Darcy, from whose son and heir, Roger Darcy, it was purchased 
in 1505 by Thomas Lucas, of Little Saxham, who in 1523 sold the same to 
Sir Thomas Kytson, the elder. From this time to the present the manor 
has passed in the same course as the Manor of Hengrave, in this Hundred. 



1 Abbr. of PI. 45 Hen. III. 9. 19147. Harl. 155, 891, 1177, 1449, 

' Pat. Rolls, 3 Edw. I. 15. 1560. 

3 Pedigrees of the Risby family will be 4 His will is dated this year, and it was 

found in the Brit. Mus. Add. 5524, proved I4th Feb. 1383-4. 




SAXHAM. 95 

SAXHAM. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times, and when the Survey 
was taken by the Abbot of St. Edmunds. It consisted of 
5 carucates of land, 12 villeins, 6 bordars, 3 ploughteams in 
demesne and 6 belonging to the men, 4 slaves, 5 acres of 
meadow, and wood sufficient to maintain 60 hogs. At the 
time of the Survey there were 4 rouncies. There were also 
15 beasts, 36 hogs, and 100 sheep. The value was 6, 

increased to 10 at the time of the Survey. It was a league long and 

5 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 7^.' 

Another estate of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and held of him by 
Albert and Fulcher at the time of the Survey, consisted of 3 freemen with 
2 carucates of land, 8 bordars, 4 ploughteams, 3 acres of meadow, sufficient 
wood to support 5 hogs, and half a mill. Two of the men could give or 
sell their land, the sac, soc, and commendation remaining in the abbot's 
possession, and the 3rd could not sell without the abbot's licence. The 
value was 8os. Also two-third shares of a church living with 6 acres of 
land. It was 8 quarentenes long and 5 broad, and paid in a gelt yd. Others 
had holdings here. 2 

Another holding here was that of a socman under Wisgar with 15 
acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 35. The Domesday tenant was 
Richard, son of Earl Gislebert. 3 

We find amongst the lands of Earl Ralph, which Goodrich the steward 
kept as being in the King's hand, six freemen under Edith the Rich by 
commendation in Saxon times (the soc being in Norton), holding a carucate 
of land, 2 bordars, 2 ploughteams, and wood sufficient for 2 hogs, valued 
at ios. 4 

SAXHAM MAGNA MANOR. 

From ancient deeds it appears that the greater part of the land in the 
parish belonged to the family of Frezill. There are evident traces of the 
house, the moat, fish ponds, &c., still remaining, and the road and green 
near the spot still are known by the names of Frizell's Way and Frizell's 
Green. 

The lands comprising this manor were held by Britulf the Saxon, son 
of Leomar, in the time of the Confessor, and were bestowed by William the 
Conqueror upon the monastery of St. Edmunds. 

Will's Rex Anglorum Rico filio comitis et R. Vicecom sal'm. Sciatis 
sue concessisse sco Eadmo, et Abb'i Baldewino t'ram Britulfi et concede ut 
inpptun h'eat. P'cipios et vobis dupb'ut faciatis Abbati. B._iusticiam 
de Petro de Valoniis et de illis, hominibz q 1 s 1 iniusticiam fe' cut p'quam 
mare tansini. De illis et hominibz Frodois de quibus hores comitis 
Eustachii, eundem Frodonem disseisierunt in Buckeshal precepto meo eum 
resaisiatis. Postea si quid sr eos recalunpuiaverint. inter eos justiciam 
teneatis. 5 

The manor remained with the monastery of St. Edmund until the 
Dissolution, when by letters patent dated 2ist Dec. 1541, it was granted to 
Sir Richard Long, son of Sir Thomas Long, of Wrasall, and to Margaret 

'Dom. ii. 357, b. 4 Dom. ii. 285. 

2 2b. 5 Regist. Sacritre, fol. 24, cited Gage, Hist. 

3 Dom. ii. 3916. of Thingoe Hundred, p. 100. 



96 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

his wife in tail male. Sir Richard was Gentleman of the Privy Chamber, 
Master of the Buckhounds and Hawks, High Steward and Keeper of several 
of the Crown liberties and demesnes, and Captain of the Islands of Guernsey 
and Jersey. Margaret his wife, afterwards Countess of Bath, was the widow 
of Sir Thomas Kytson, of Hengrave, by her Sir Richard having had one 
son, Henry Long, to whom the King stood sponsor, and three daughters. 
He, Sir Richard, died 2gth Sept. 1546, and Henry Long had livery of his 
father's lands 28th May, 1565. By Dorothy his wife, daughter of Nicholas 
Clerke, of Weston, co. Oxford, he had issue an only child Elizabeth, wife 
of William, Lord Russell, of Thornhaugh, father of Francis, 4th Earl of 
Bedford. 

On the death of Henry Long, 1 in 1573, without male issue, the manor 
reverted to the Crown, and the prize was eagerly contended for by the 
grasping courtiers of the day. 

Thomas Knyvet, Groom of the Privy Chamber, obtained a lease for 
21 years of the mansion house, or the site of the manor, then in the occupa- 
tion of William Barnaby and Lady Fitzwarren his wife, and of the demesne 
and certain other lands, not including the manor and advowson, nor about 
50 acres called Herstwood, alias Hersewood. The stewardship of the 
manor was given to Edward Carye, another Groom of the Privy Chamber, 
younger son of Lord Hunsdon ; and Herstwood was leased to him for 21 
years, the reversion of it being bestowed on the Earl of Leicester. Sir 
Christopher Hatton came in for Baunton's Grove and Spring, part of the 
lands in lease to Knyvet.. The day after the Earl of Leicester received 
his patent of Herstwood he sold it to Morley and Swayn. 

Morley obtained from the Queen a lease for 21 years in remainder 
expectant upon the determination of Knyvet's lease, and then procured a 
further lease for 21 years, which was made to comprise the manor and 
advowson ; and buying up Swayn's interest in Herstwood, and Sir Christopher 
Hatton's in Baunton's, he sold all his estate to Sir Thomas Kytson 
and Elizabeth his wife. They, in 1591, purchased from Edward Heron, 
of Lincoln's Inn, Esquire, William Cardinal, of Hadleigh, John Nicholas, 
of Westminster, and John Dixon, citizen of London, subject to a fee-farm 
rent of 28. 155. 3^., the reversion in fee they had acquired from the Crown 
in 1589 of such parts as were held in lease ; so that the Kytsons thus 
became seised of the whole. 7 

In 1597 Sir Thomas Kytson 3 and Elizabeth his wife, by deed dated 
8th Sept. in consideration of 3,000, sold the manor and advowson of Great 
Saxham, to John Eldred, citizen of London, and the same were limited 
to him for life, remainder to Rivet Eldred, his elder son and heir-apparent, 
in tail male, remainder to John Eldred, his younger son, in fee. 

The fine effecting the assurance was levied by John Eldred, sen., 
against Sir Thomas Kytson in Middlemas Term, 39-40 Eliz. 4 

John Eldred was the 4th son of John Eldred, of Buckenham, in Norfolk, 
son of John Eldred, of Knattishall, son of William, who was son of John 
Eldred, of Knattishall. He was a member of the Clothmakers' Company 

'He was buried in the church of St. J Gage, Thingoe Hundred, p. 104-5. 

Andrew by the Wardrobe, Black- 3 See Manor of Hengrave, in this Hundred, 

friars. His will is dated 3oth *Ib. where a particular of the manor in 
March, 15 Eliz., and was proved 1597 will be found. 

1 6th April following. 



SAXHAM. 97 

and an alderman of the City of London. He married Mary, daughter of 
Thomas Rivett, of Rishangles. 

He made his will, which bears date 8th Oct. 1630, desiring to be buried 
at Great Saxham, if he died in Suffolk, but if in London to be buried in the 
Church of Basinghall, where his wife was buried, in which parish he had 
lived many years. To her son, then Rivet Eldred, he devised the Manor 
of Great Saxham, and appointed him executor. He died at Great Saxham, 
and was buried there 8th Dec. 1632, his will being proved on the 4th Jan. 
following. 

His eldest son, Rivet Eldred, was created a baronet 2Qth Jan. 1641. 
He married Ann, daughter of John Blakewey, of the County of Salop, by 
whom he had no issue, and dying in London was buried gth Dec. 1652, in 
the family vault in the church of St. Michael, Basinghall, according to his 
desire expressed in his will. 

This will is dated Qth Dec. 1643, and confirms a settlement dated 8th 
June, 14 Chas. I., under which and under certain fines and recoveries of 
the i6th year of the King all his lands were limited to himself and Ann his 
wife in tail, remainder to their heirs, with power of revocation. He left 
certain small legacies to his two brothers and three sisters, 100 to the poor 
of Great Saxham, and for repairing and beautifying the church, and the 
remainder to his wife, whom he appointed executrix. 

Lady Eldred, the widow, became the wife of Thomas Arnold, alderman 
of London, and gave the estate on her death back to her ist husband's 
family. By her will, dated 6th June, 1671, proved by her executor, George 
Arnold, 2Oth of the same month, she devised the Manor of Great Saxham 
in fee to her nephew, son and heir of John Eldred, deceased. Under this 
will John Eldred, grandson and heir of John Eldred, next brother and heir 
of Sir Rivet Eldred, took the manor and held his first court there loth Sept. 
1672. 

He was the son of John Eldred, of Knightsbridge, co. Middlesex, by 
Charity, daughter of James Rivers, eldest son of Sir John Rivers, of Chafford, 
co. Kent, Bart., which John was the son of John Eldred, brother of Sir 
Rivet Eldred, by Dorothea his wife, daughter of Edward Goodwin, of Home, 
co. Surrey. John Eldred, the devisee's grandfather, had died in Jan. 
1649, an d his father in 1671. He married in 1686 Elizabeth, daughter of 
Francis Hervey, alias Mildmay, of Marks, in Essex, and died ist March, 
1724, being buried at Great Saxham, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, John Eldred, who lived till 1746. 

In 1745, however, the manor and advowson of Great Saxham were 
sold by deed dated 8th Aug. 1745, to Hutchison Mure, a younger son of 
the Mures of Caldwell, co. Renfrew, N.B. He expended considerable 
sums in embellishing the grounds, under the direction of Capability Brown, 
and commenced building a mansion upon a most extensive scale. He, 
however, never completed it, and died at Great Saxham seised of the manor 
in 1794, leaving by Mary his wife a son and heir, Robert Mure, who the 
following year sold the manor to Thomas Mills, who was High Sheriff of 
the county in 1805. He was the son of William Mills, 1 of Clapham, co. 
Surrey, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of James Hatch, of Claybery Hall, 
Chigwell, co. Essex. Thomas Mills, the purchaser of Saxham, married 
Susanna, daughter and coheir of Christopher Harris, of Bellevere, co. Devon, 

1 See Manor of Argents, Stutton, in Samford Hundred. 
N 



98 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and dying 5th Jan. 1834, was buried at Great Saxham, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, William Mills, who married 5th June, 1817, 
Clara Jane, 2nd daughter of the Rev. Richard Huntley, of Boxwell Court, 
co. Gloucester, and dying in 1865 the manor devolved on his son and heir, 
Thomas Richard Mills, who was High Sheriff of the county in 1871. He 
married, 3ist May, 1845, Emily, only surviving daughter of the Hon. 
Samuel Hall, seigneur of Chambly, near Montreal, Canada, and dying in 
1884 the manor passed to his 2nd but only surviving son, Thomas Richard 
Mills. The manor was prior to 1896 acquired by Charles Morley, of The 
Beeches, Soham, who is the present lord. 

Arms of ELDRED : Or, on a bend regu!6 Sable, three besants, a martlet 
for difference. Of MURE : Argent, on a fesse Azure, three martlets of 
the first within a bordure engrailed Gules. Of MILLS : Erm. a fer-de-moline, 
Sa. 

A manor house was erected by John Eldred, the alderman, about 
1600, vulgarly called Nutmeg Hall by reason of John Eldred, the erector 
and owner, being the first to introduce nutmegs and other spices into 
England. His voyage to Tripolis and travels thence to Babylon are des- 
cribed in Hackluyt's " Collection of Voyages." The mansion was altered 
and enlarged by Hutchison Mure under the direction of William Adams 
in 1774. The mansion had a centre porch and five crow-stepped gables 
in front, an outer court to the north, a labyrinth to the south, and lines of 
trees planted in different .directions. 

This building was burnt down in 1779, and the present building begun 
by Hutchison Mure, who built the centre, the whole being finished by Thomas 
Mills in 1798. It stands on the site of the former hall, and is situated in 
the midst of a fine park of 140 acres, the grounds being tastefully laid out. 

It is said that the custom of gavelkind prevails in this manor. 

WODETHORP HALL. 

Sir Edmund de Hemegrave and Thomas his son in 1333 enfeoffed 
Edmund de Mutford with their Manor of Great Saxham called Wodethdrp 
Hall. 

This manor passed under the name of Sir Thomas's Tenement, and appears 
to have been purchased, together with Leo's Hall, in Westley, from the 
feoffees of Sir Thomas de Hemegrave, the last of his family, by Thomas 
Hethe, of Hengrave, and subsequently to have been sold to Humphrey, 
Earl of Stafford. 1 

SAXHAM HALL PARVA MANOR OR GRACE'S. 

This manor was held by the Abbot of St. Edmunds at the time of the 
Survey. According to Abbot Baldwin's feudal book, Albert the Norman 
held a carucate, and Fulcher, another Norman, a carucate and a half in 
Little Saxham. When Sampson became abbot in 1180, Gilbert Fitz Ralph 
and William Fitz Robert respectively held a knight's fee in this place, doing 
one suit each to the Hundred. In 1197 Gilbert Fitz Ralph by a fine 
acknowledged the service of three knights' fees for his lands in Saxham, 
Thelnetham, Hepworth, Gissing, and Reydon to be due to Abbot Sampson, 

'Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, p. 101. 



SAXHAM. 9g 

and at the same time Walter de Saxham, who had succeeded William Fitz 
Robert, acknowledged the service of one knight's fee to be due for his lands 
in Saxham and Ashfield. 

In 1200 Gilbert Fitz Ralph and Walter de Saxham continued seised of 
their several fees, and out of the fee of the one arose the manor called Geddings 
or Topesfteld's, in Saxham, and out of the fee of the other the manor called 
Large s. The lands of Gilbert Fitz Ralph inherited by Ralph, son of 
William de Saxham, were subsequently acquired by the monastery of 
St. Edmunds and Adam de Geddyng, and in 1234 were held by Adarn de 
Geddyngand William, son of Giles de Neketon and Isabella de Thelnetham, 
but in 1290 it is clear that the abbot alone had the chief lordship. 

The manor appears to have belonged in the time of Edw. I. to Godfrey 
de Bruario or Hethe, who was the son of William de Bruario, of Little 
Saxham. Godfrey died about 1293, and was succeeded by his son and 
heir, Walter de Hethe, and he by his son and heir, William, to whom 
succeeded his son and heir, Robert de Hethe, on whose death the manor 
devolved on his son and heir, John de Hethe. In 1360 John enfeoffed 
Roger de Hornigge, parson of Little Saxham, Robert de Hethe, chaplain, 
and others, with all his lands in Saxham, Risby, Barrow, Lackford, Flempton, 
Westow, Westley, and Ickworth, and in 1370 he and Amy his wife, widow 
of Philip de Risby, had a lease for their lives from Sir Thomas de Hengrave 
of his Manor of Leo's Hall. In 1382 John de Hethe enfeoffed the 2nd son 
John, rector of Harksted, and Thomas de Risby, parson of Little Wratting, 
with all his lands in Little Saxham, Risby, and Lackford, excepting 
the lands in Risby of the dower of Amy his wife, and the lands called 
Cold Hall, and the feoffees granted the same to John and Amy his wife 
for life, with remainder to Robert, their son, and Margery his wife, in 
special tail, with remainder to John de Hethe, rector of Harksted, Thomas 
de Hethe, and Elizabeth his wife, and Richard de Hethe, brothers of the 
said Robert, for life, with remainder as to one-half to the said Thomas de 
Hethe in tail, and as to the other half to the said Richard in tail, with 
remainder to the right heirs of John de Hethe, the father. 1 

John de Hethe died about 1360, and the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Robert de Hethe. By a deed dated the Sunday next after the Feast 
of St. Lawrence in the 2Oth year of Rich. II., he enfeoffed Thomas Astley 
and others with half of his Manor of Large's ; that is to say, the half which 
Sir John Cavendish formerly held, together with all his lands in various 
places therein named ; and the feoffees regranted the same to the said 
Robert and Margery his wife and their heirs. He died on the 2ist August 
the same year [1396], and Thomas was found to be his son and heir, of the age 
of 13 at the Feast of Pentecost then last. 2 

William, Abbot of St. Edmunds, upon the decease of Robert de Hethe, 
gave to Margery his widow, daughter and coheir of Edward Durward, of 
Bures, who afterwards married Sir John White, Knt., the wardship and 
marriage of the son Thomas, and if he died the wardship and marriage 
of Anne his sister. 

Thomas de Hethe married Anna, daughter of Sir Bryan de Stapleton, 
of Ingham, by Cecilia, daughter of William, Lord Bardolf, who afterwards 
remarried Sir Walter de Trumpington, Knt. Thomas de Hethe died 7th 

'Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, 127. 'I.P.M., Lavenham, 20 Rich. II. 28. 



too THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK 

Nov. 1439, leaving by his will, dated 6th of the same month, the manor to 
his wife Anna for life. He left an only daughter, Elizabeth, married to 
Sir William Berdewell, of Bardwell. 

Elizabeth died in her mother's lifetime, leaving an only daughter and 
heir Margaret, married to John Harleston, of Harleston, who left t\v<> 
daughters only Alice, married to Sir Richard Fitz Lewes, of Writtle, co. 
Essex, and Margaret, married to Sir Thomas Darcy, of Danby. In 1484 
on a partition of the estates the inheritance of Little Saxham was allotted 
to Thomas Darcy and Margaret his wife in special tail. The deed is dated 
aoth May, 1484. 

Sir Thomas Darcy died in 1486, and Margaret in 1489, and Sir Roger 
Darcy 1 their son in 1504 sold the manor to Thomas Lucas. His father, 
John Lucas, had held lands in West Stow, probably acquired through his 
grandfather, John Lucas's, wife Maud, one of the daughters and coheirs 
of Walter Brampton, of Brampton. John Lucas, or Fitz Lucas, as he was 
called, was the son of Edmund Fitz Lucas, of Weston, the son of John Fitz 
Lucas, by Maud, daughter and coheir of Walter Brampton, John Fitz Lucas 
being the son and heir of Edmund Fitz Lucas /. Edw. III., by Elizabeth, 
sister and coheir of Sir Thomas Morieux, Knt., Constable of the Tower, and 
daughter and heir of Sir John Morieux, Knt. The purchaser of this manor, 
Thomas Lucas, was Solicitor-General to King Hen. VII., having been 
promoted to that office from the household of Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pem- 
broke and Duke of Bedford, uncle to Hen. VII., to which Jasper he acted 
as secretary. He married Elizabeth, daughter of John Kennys, of Rayland, 
in Wales. In 1500 Richard, Abbot of St. Martin's de Bello, bestowed upon 
him for services rendered to the monastery the advowson of the church 
of Thurlow, and an annual pension of two marks and a half issuing out of 
the vicarage. 

Immediately after Thomas Lucas's purchase from Sir Roger Darcy 
he laid the foundations of Little Saxham Hall. 1 This house stood till 
1773, when it was pulled down by Richard Croftes, M.P., and there remain 
now only the moat and some bits of masonry on its banks. But the 
foundations are still discernible. 

He died 7th July, I53I. 3 In the north wall of the chancel of the 
church in Little Saxham are the remains of the cenotaph of this Lucas, 
which Chitting notices thus : 

" A tomb of stone, made for Thomas Lucas, Solicitor to Hen. VII. 
which has scutcheons of his wife's coats, but he was never buried in it." 
It was an altar tomb standing under an arch that opened into the Lucas 
Chapel ; the arch is now filled up, and these shields of the tomb are inserted 
in the wall : (i) Lucas and Morieux quarterly ; (2) Lucas impaling Morieux ; 
(3) Lucas and Morieux quarterly, impaling Kemys. (4) Kemys. 

By his will dated ist July, 1531, proved in London I2th March, 1531-2, 
he devised the site of his place or house in Little Saxham, within the great 
hedge or pale going about or encompassing the place to his grandson, 
Thomas Lucas, son of Jasper, deceased, in tail male, remainder to the 
testator's 3rd son, John Lucas, in tail male, remainder to the testator's 

'See Manor of Norton, in Blackbourn building of this house. Extracts 

Hundred. from it were published in Gage's 

* A MS. in tie British Museum contains the Hist, of Thingoe Hundred, 

items of expenses incurred in the 3 I.P.M., 23 Hen. VIII. 62. 



SAXHAM. IOI 

daughters, Anne Barnardiston and Lettice Grenfeld, in tail. And he gave 
to his son, John Lucas, in tail male, among other hereditaments, Geddyng's 
or Topesfield's, Large's, and Grace's Manors in Little Saxham, and Leo's 
Hall, in Westley ; and also the remainder to which the testator was entitled 
under the will of his wife's brother, Roger Kemys, in the Manors of Rogerston 
and Sutton, and lands in Newport and Wenlock.' 

The inquis. p.m. was taken at Hennowe 25th Sept. 1531. The jurors 
find that : ' Thomas Lucas was seised (under conveyances to trustees) of 
the manor called Larges and Graces with 12 messuages, 50 acres of land, 
6 acres of meadow, 300 acres of pasture, 20 acres of wood, and 205. of rent in 
Little and Great Saxham, Ikworth, Fornham, Westle, Great Hornyngeserth, 
Little Hornyngserth, Chevyngton and Rysby, and the Manor of Geddyngs- 
hall alias Toppysfeilds with appurtenances in Great and Little Saxham, 
Rysby, Westle, Norton, Ikworth and Chevyngton, and of all the lands 
belonging in Flempton and Lackford late belonging to Roger Dunwych." 
' The manors of Graces, Larges and Toppisfelds " were found to be held of 
the Abbot of St. Edmund in Bury, service not known and worth 20 per 
annum. 

Thomas Lucas had three sons and two daughters, the eldest of whom, 
Jasper, married Margery, daughter and heir of Robert Geddyng, and died 
lyth Feb. 1530, in his father's lifetime, leaving, with other children, a son 
Thomas. He and his uncle, John Lucas, sold their estates in Little Saxham 
to Sir John Croftes, of West Stow, in 1551. 2 

Sir John Croftes's mother was Elizabeth Hervey. He married Maria, 
daughter of Thomas Shirley, of Wistneston, co. Sussex, and by his will, 
dated 2ist Jan. I557, 3 an d proved in London, loth May, 1559, devised all 
the manors, lands, tenements, and hereditaments which he had purchased 
from John Lucas and Thomas Lucas, in Little Saxham, &c., to his executors 
his son, Edmund Croftes, Henry Paine, and William Hervey, for the term 
of six years in trust to pay his debts and certain legacies. The manor 
descended to Sir John's son and heir, Edmund Croftes. Edmund Croftes 
only survived his father about three weeks, and their inquisitions were taken 
the same day, namely, 4th June, 1558, before Andrew Ryvett,gent., escheator, 
at Stowmarket. These found that before the death of Edmund (in the 
inquisition he is almost invariably called Edward), his father, John Croftes 
was seised, amongst divers other manors, of the manors of " Little Saxham, 
Large's, Grace's, Geddyngshall otherwise Toppisfieldj and Leesehall other- 
wise Lucehall and of a capital messuage in which Thomas Lucas, Esq., 
late dwelt on Little Saxham, and a dovecote belonging thereto, and also 
of 16 other messuages, 500 acres of land, 20 acres of meadow, 200 acres of 
pasture, 40 acres of wood, 200 (? 100) acres of furze and heath, 405. rent 
and four pounds of cinnamon in Little Saxham, Great Saxham, Barowe, 
Rysbie, Fornham All Saints, Westley, Little Horningserth, Great Hornings- 
serth, Ikworth, Chevington and Norton and advowson of the parish church 
of Little Saxham," which hereditaments were of the yearly value of 
156. 135. 4^., and that Edmund, his son, was heir, and of the age of 37 
years ; " and by his last will declared : I will to my executors all my lands 

'Gage's Hist, of Thingoe, p. 132. The said to have been proved 2oth 

will is given in full by the Rev. April, 1532, PC.C. 14 Thrower. 

S. H. A. Hervey in his Little 'Fine, Mich. 5 Edw. VI. 

Saxham Parish Registers, Wood- 3 See Manor of West Stow, in Blackbourn 
bridge, 1901, p. 120, where it is Hundred. 



102 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and tenements late purchased of John Lucas and Thomas Lucas in Great 
Saxham, Risbye, Westley, Horningsherth, Ikworth, and Chevington with 
the stock of sheep there, they taking the profits for six years after my 
death for payment of my debts and fulfilment of my will." And he 
appointed Edward Croftes, Osbert Mountford, Henry Payne, William 
Harvey, and Thomas Croftes his executors. And Edmund Croftes died 
seised of the reversion of the above, and they are worth per annum 
53. 6s. 8d. And the manors of Little Saxham, Gcdding Hall, and Luce 
Hall are held of the King and Queen as of their barony of St. Edmund by 
half a knight's fee. And the Manor of Larges, with the capital messuage, 
and other premises in Little and Great Saxham, Horningsherth, Ikworth, 
Chevington, and Norton (except the advowson of Little Saxham) are held 
of the King and Queen as of the said barony by another half-knight's fee ; 
and the advowson is held as of their Manor of East Greenwich by fealty 
only in socage. . . . The said Edward died the I4th Feb. last past ; 
and Thomas Croftes is his son and heir, and at the time of this inquisition 
is within 8 days of 18 years of age. And John Croftes is another son of 
Elianor lawfully begotten and 8 years old and more. And said Edmund 
Croftes before his death, to wit loth Feb. 4 and 5 Philip and Mary, by a deed 
demised the capital messuage called Jennys together with all the buildings 
&c., belonging and the close called Cages Close in Barton to one Osbert 
Mountford, Esq., for a term of 5 years paying to the said Edmund and his 
heirs 10 marks per annum." 

The devolution of the manor from the death of Sir John Croftes, I5th 
Jan. 1557-8, to the death of his great-grandson and namesake, Sir John 
Croftes,' in 1628, is identical with that of the Manor of West Stow, in 
Blackbourn Hundred. On the marriage, in 1610, of Sir Henry Croftes, 
son of this last Sir John Croftes with his ist wife Elizabeth, 3rd daughter 
of Sir Richard Wortley, of Wortley, Little Saxham was settled by deed 
dated ist Nov. 1610, upon him in tail. Sir Henry Croftes was knighted 
on 22nd Jan. 1611, and represented Eye in Parliament in 1624 and Bury 
St. Edmunds in 1640. 

His ist wife, Elizabeth, died ist Oct. 1642, and against the east wall 
of the Lucas chapel, in Little Saxham church, is a tablet to her memory, with 
her bust and the arms of Croftes impaling Wortley, with this inscription : 

Here lyes the body of Elizabeth, late wife of 
Sir Henry Croftes, and thirde daughtr. of Elizabeth Countess 

of Devonshr., by her first husband Sir Richd. Wortely, 

of Worteley, in Yorkshr. In memory of whom, and whose 

virtues, and in testimony of his love, her husband hath 

dedicated this unworthy monument. 
She had a large proportio of personeil beauty and handsomeness, 

ye endowments of hir mind beinge much more eminent, 
She had a truly pious and religious hart towards God, and 
spent constantly many houres of every day in his service 
both in publicke and private dt-votions and holy duties. She was a most 
virtuous, chaste, and loving wife, a most duteful and obedient childe, a 
most tender, careful and affectionate Mother ; a faithful, constant and 
trueharted friende ; and in summe, a woman of extraordinary perfectio. 

'He was buried in Little Saxham, 2Qth March, 1628. Mention is made in the Parish 
Register of a portrait of Sir John Croftes, drawn in 1612, in his 4gth year. For 
account of the Croftes family, see the Rev. S. H. A. Hervey's Little Saxham 
Parish Registers, p. 157 el seq. 



SAXHAM. 103 

She had 10 Childre, five sonns and as many daughtrs. Willia, Thorn. Edmund 
Charls. and Henry ; Elizabeth, Mary, Hester, Cisely, and Katherine ; 4 
of them died younge, namely, Edmund, Henry, Mary and Cisely ; ye rest 
continue till this day, whom God in his mercy Long prosper and preserve. 
She dyed Octobr. ye i ; Ano. 1642. In the 47th yeare of her age. This 
is ye faithfull and loving testimony of hir husband, who intends no other 
monumet for himself, but desires only to live in hir memory, which was 
so much ye worthier person, yet hopes that God will so dispose of his 
death that as they lived 32 yeres together, in all comforte, and perfect 
love,_so Their bodeys may lye and rest peacably together untill ye Resur- 
rectio, when they may likewise rise together, to have their joyes in heaven 
together compleated, wch ye Lord of Heave grant for his infinite mercie's 
sake in Christ Jesus. 

Amen." 

Sir Henry Croftes not long before his death gave up Little Saxham 
to his son William, and went to reside elsewhere, probably in Bury St. 
Edmunds. By an indenture dated 25th June, 1664, between himself of 
the first part ; Dame Margery, his 2nd wife, of the second part ; William, 
Lord Croftes, eldest son of Sir Henry, of the third part ; and Sir Edmund 
Poley, Knt., and John Sotheby, and a fine thereupon levied, Sir Henry 
Croftes settled the manor and advowson of Little Saxham and all messuages, 
mills, lands, sheepwalks, &c., belonging to it lying in Little and Great 
Saxham, Barrow, Risby, Fornham All Saints, Westley, Great and Little 
Horningsheath, Ickworth, Chevington, and Nowton, upon William, Lord 
Croftes, and his heirs until he or they made default in payment of several 
sums of money, viz., 600 to Sir Henry yearly during life or 5,000 to his 
executors within two years after his decease with interest at 6 per cent. 
per annum, till paid, with a proviso that if Lord Croftes should make default 
in payment of the said 600 or 5,000 or any part thereof, then the use of 
the said manor to Lord Croftes should be absolutely void, and Sir Edmund 
Poley and John Sotheby should be seised of it to the use of Sir Henry for 
his life, and after his death to the use of such persons as he should by his 
last will declare. 

Sir Henry Croftes died in March, 1667, and was buried at Little Saxham 
the 3ist of the same month. By his will dated 2ist Oct. 1664,' he dealt 
with the 5,000 payable to his executors by Lord Croftes, and provided 
for the contingency of the sum not being paid by a devise of a manor and 
advowson of Little Saxham to Charles, Lord Cornwallis, and Sir Thomas 
Cullum his trustees, upon trust for sale, and out of the proceeds to pay the 
5,000 as directed by his will, with additional sums of 1,000 to each of his 
three daughters Mary, Cecily, and Elizabeth ; the residue, after three 
legacies, of 500, one to his son John Crofts, D.D., another to his daughter 
Katherine Crofts, and the third to Edmund Poley, 2nd son of Sir Edmund 
Poley, being given to William, Lord Croftes, to whom he also gave " all 
the hangings, chaires, tables, carpetts, and other furniture in the severall 
roomes or chambers following in the house wherein I now or late dwelt in 
Little Saxham ; viz. the King's chamber, the greene velvett bedd chamber 
and the dyning room otherwise called the great chamber." 

William Lord Croftes, Sir Henry's son, is said to have been brought 
up in the household of the Duke of York. He certainly was a page to 

1 Proved 3oth April, 1667, by Dame Margery Croftes, his relict. P.C.C., 45 Carr. A 
full extract is given by the Rev. S. H. A. Hervey in West Stow Parish Regis- 
ters, Woodbridge, 1903, p. 157. 



104 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Queen Henrietta Maria, being subsequently the Master of the Horse and 
Captain of the Guard to the Queen Mother. He was a wild, hasty-tempered 
man, engaged in many duels, and accompanied the Royal family in their 
exile to France. He had been before the Restoration appointed to the 
Royal bedchamber in 1652 ,' and created Baron Croftes of Little Saxham, 
the patent being dated at Brussels i8th May, 1658, after the Restoration, 
the King honouring him with a visit at Little Saxham at least four times, viz., 
in 1666, 1668, 1670, and 1676. The first visit is recorded in the parish 
register of Westley :* " His Majestic (being at my Lord Croftes) came into 
the field to see Bury at a distance, and returned to Saxham Hall through 
Westley, riding between His Royal Highness the Duke of Yorke and Sir 
Edmund Bacon, High Sheriff of the Countie, whose guard in a very splendid 
equipage waited on his Majesty at the same time." The second visit is 
recorded by Pepys, who was there at the time, and who says that the King 
was drunk, and could not see Lord Arlington when he came about State 
affairs. The third visit is recorded by the printing of the sermon that was 
preached before his Majesty in Saxham church. Amongst other visitors 
to Saxham Hall in Lord Croftes' time were the Dukes of Monmouth and 
Buckingham, George Porter, and Baptist May. Lord Croftes was visited 
on his deathbed by Evelyn, the diarist, who was staying with Lord Arlington 
at Euston. He married ist Dorothy, daughter of Sir John Hobart, Bart., 
and widow of Sir John Hele, and 2ndly Elizabeth, daughter of William, 
Lord Spencer, 3 of Wormleighton, widow of John, Lord Craven, and of Henry 
Howard, 3rd son of Thomas, 3rd Earl of Berkshire, and died without issue 
nth Sept. 1677,* when his honours became extinct, 5 and the little Saxham 
property passed to the issue of his uncle, Anthony Croftes, of West Stow, 
namely, to William Croftes, his 2nd son by Maria his wife, daughter of 
Richard Franklin, of Welsden, co. Middlesex, widow of Sir John Smyth, 
of Leeds Castle, co. Kent. 

The property had been settled on him in 1675 by his cousin, William, 
Lord Croftes, when marrying Mary, only daughter of Philip, 3rd Viscount 
Wenman. William Croftes was a major in the army, and represented 
Bury St. Edmunds in Parliament in 1685. He had no issue by his ist 
wife, but by his 2nd Anne, daughter and coheir of William Allington, of 
Bury St. Edmunds, he had a son, Anthony Croftes, who on his father's 
death in Jan. 1695, succeeded to the lordship and married in Sept. 1708, 
his ist cousin once removed, Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Richard Gipps, of 
Little Horringer Hall, Knt. 6 

Anthony Croftes died and was buried at Little Saxham i8th June, 
1725, and the manor passed to his son, William Croftes, who resided at 
West Harling. He, the igth Dec. 1737, married Mary, daughter of Sir 
Matthew Decker, of St. James's Square, London, and died I4th Nov. 
1770, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Richard Croftes. He 
was of St. John's College, Cambridge, and from 1771 to 1780 represented the 
University of Cambridge in Parliament. In 1773 he pulled down Little 

1 In Sept. 1662, he had a pension of 1,000 'His younger brother John was Dean of 

a year for this office. Norwich from 1660 to 1670, and 

1 1665-6, Saturday, March loth. another younger brother Charles 

J A portrait of William, Lord Croftes, is at was shot in a duel by Jeffrey 

Althorpe. It was engraved for Hudson, the dwarf. 

Gage's Hist, of Tlu'ngoe Hundred. 'She was buried at Little Saxham, 2ist 

4 He was buried at Little Saxham, 23rd Aug. 1753. 

Sept. 



SAXHAM. 105 

Saxham Hall. In 1772 he married Harrietta, daughter of John Darell, 
of York, at St. James's Square, London, and died 5th July, 1783, leaving 
a daughter Harriet his sole heir, married to Sir John Saunders Sebright, 
Bart. 

Under the will of Richard Croftes dated Qth May, 1781, the manor of 
Little Saxham passed to his next brother, Charles Croftes, who as well 
as his younger brother, William Croftes, died in India without issue, the 
former in 1785. Charles Croftes, by his will dated 2Oth Aug. 1785, devised 
his manor and advowson of Saxham to trustees in fee with power of sale 
for his sisters, Melisina Mary, married to Francis Lewis Samuel Pache, 
and Henrietta Croftes, Canoness of the Noble Order of St. Sepulchre, 
and in 1789 the trustees, by deeds dated 23rd and 24th June, 1789, sold 
the same, consisting of i,589a. 2r. 4p.,let at 1,067. i6s. 6d.,' for 16,043 to 
Charles, Marquis of Cornwallis, who in 1795, under an Act of Parliament 
passed 20 Geo. III., exchanged this property for West Stow with Robert 
Rushbrooke. 

In the very interesting and original notes of the Rev. S. H. A. Hervey 
to his Little Saxham Parish Registers/ he gives us the reason why Robert 
Rushbrooke made the exchange and secured for himself Little Saxham. 
" He was very anxious to obtain the fine old hall at Rushbrooke for his 
family, because his name and its name were the same and possibly his 
remote ancestors had been there. Now at this time the heir of Ickworth 
was also the heir of Rushbrooke. The two properties were bound before 
many years to have the same owner. And anybody standing in Ickworth 
park, somewhere near Moredeboice cottages and the Linnet, can see what 
a gain it was that the park pale should not be, as it then was, at the brook, 
but that it should take in the rising ground that lay on the further or 
Saxham side of it. So Robert Rushbrooke thought that if he had Little 
Saxham he would be in a better position for getting Rushbrooke by an 
exchange with Lord Bristol. If he and Lord Bristol each had something 
that the other wanted, there would not be much difficulty in making an 
exchange. So he secured Little Saxham. And in due time Lord Bristol 
came into possession of Rushbrooke, and then the two properties were 
exchanged." 

In 1808, on the marriage of Robert Rushbrooke, the son, with Frances 
Davers, an arrangement was effected between Frederick William, Earl 
of Bristol, ist Marquis, heir general of the family of Davers and the Rush- 
brooke family, whereby the latter received Rushbrooke Hall in exchange 
for their estate in Little Saxham. The deeds carrying into effect the 
arrangement are dated 8th and loth Oct. 1808. The manor has since 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Ickworth, in this Hundred, 
and is now vested in the present Marquis of Bristol. A part of what is 
now Ickworth Park lies in Little Saxham parish and was once part of 
Little Saxham Park. 

Saxham Parva Manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir John 
Curson in 1472 ; 3 of Sir John Croftes, who died i5th Jan. I557" 8 '* and of 
Edmund Croftes, who died i4th Feb. 1557-8. 5 

Gage says of the hall built by Lucas : " It was one of those picturesque, 
brick, embattled manor-houses, with towers, irregular gables, finials, and 

'The timber was valued at 6,000. "I.P.M., 4 & 5 Ph. and M. 54. 

2 P. 212. 5 I.P.M., 4 & 5 Ph. and M. 21. 

'I.P.M., ii Edw. IV. 32. 

O 



106 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

clusters of ornamental chimneys, of which VVolterton Hall, in Norfolk, 
is so fine an example, and the style of which prevails in an inferior degree 
in the neighbouring Hall of Westow. It was moated, fenced with deep 
ditches, and approached by a causeway, having a drawbridge over the 
moat, and a tower gate-house. There was an outer and inner court, with 
bay windows to the hall and parlour embattled, a fumerel rising in the 
centre of the hall roof ; and the tower staircase, as well as the gatehouse, 
was crowned with vanes. 

" Sir John Cutts* mansion at Thaxted, in Essex, which Leland calls 
a very sumptuous house, served as a model, in some respects, for Little 
Saxham Hall. The chief mason was John Brond, of St. Edmondsbury ; 
and two of the workmen employed about King Henry the Seventh's Chapel 
at Westminster, were brought down to execute one of the windows, after 
the pattern of a window of Mr. Scott's, probably at Stapleford Tany, 
in Essex. The painted glass was very rich, all the windows of the mansion 
being powdered throughout with the broome cod, or Plantagenet cognizance, 
in compliment to Jaspar, Duke of Bedford, and those in the principal 
apartments being filled with imagery and heraldic devices. In a window 
of the domestic chapel was represented the Passion, designed by Bush, 
and stained by Robert Wright, of St. Edmundsbury, the same artisan who 
executed the painted glass escutcheons at Hengrave. The hall was fitted 
up with arras.'" 

Arms of HETHE : Argent, three gun-stones or ogresses Sable. 

MANOR OF GEDDYNG'S OR TOPESFIELDS. 

The land forming this manor was originally held by William de Saxham, 2 
and passed to his son and heir, Ralph de Saxham, who sold the same to 
Nicholas de Geddyng, son of Adam de Geddyng, by a deed undated, which 
is given by Mr. Gage in his History of Thingoe Hundred. 3 On Nicholas 
de Geddyng's death the manor passed to his son and heir, Adam, who 
held the same in 1286,* and was living in 1300, as appears from Abbot 
Northwold's book of fees, where it is recorded that " Adam de Geddinge, 
Willielmus heres Egidii de Neketon it Matheus de Thelnetham tenent 
tria feod' milit' que Rad'us de Saxham obim Gilbertus fitz Radi per indivisi 
tenemento, unde, d'cus Adam tz unum Leod' in parva Saxham." On 
Adam de Geddyng's death the manor passed to his son and heir, Edmund 
de Geddyng, who in 1317 quitclaim to William, son of Walter de Heth and 
Agnes his wife all annual rents accruing in the lands holden of him by the 
said Walter and Agnes in Saxham. 

In 1346 the manor was vested in Lucy de Risby, and in 1412 in William 
de Topesfield, on whose death it passed to his son and heir, William de 
Topesneld, who in 1427 enfeoffed Robert Ward, clerk, Edmund Selion, 
and others with his Manor of Geddyng's, settling the same in effect on 
Jane, the wife of the said William de Topesfield, for life, with remainder 
to Ralph Topesfield, her son, and Alice his wife, and the heirs of the same 

'Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, p. 139. 'Indeed he probably held in 1281, for on 

*A pedigree of the family will be found the Patent Rolls this year we find 

Add. MSS. British Museum, 19148, an action was pending between 

and in Genealogical Notes in the John, son of Adam de Geddyng, 

Bodleian, Rawlinson MSS. B 319. and Adam, son of Nicholas de 

See also S. I. viii. 195, x. 26. Geddyng, touching possessions in 

' p. 122. Little Saxham. (Pat. Rolls,9 Edw. I. 

26d.) 



SAXHAM. 107 

Ralph in tail. Certain disputes having arisen in the family over the 
property an agreement was come to gth Feb. 1474, for terminating such 
between Dame Jane Topesfield, then a widow, and William her grandson, 
she agreeing for herself and Ralph her son, and Simon Wiseman, brother 
of Eleanor, wife of William, on his behalf, that Jane should have for her 
Ufe the manor, with remainder to her son Ralph in tail. 

By a bargain and sale dated 26th Sept. 1504, and a fine levied and 
recoveries suffered in Michaelmas term of the same year, the manor was, in 
consideration of 190, conveyed by Alice Coke, late wife of Ralph Topesfield, 
Thomas Tige and Margaret his wife, and Edward Poley and Jane his wife 
(Margaret and Jane being daughters and heirs of Ralph Topesfield) to 
Thomas Lucas. From this time the manor has descended in the same 
course as the main Manor of Little Saxham. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Thomas 
Lucas, who died 7th July, 1531 ;' of Sir John Croftes, who died I5th Jan. 
J 557-8 ',* and of Edmund Croftes, who died i4th Feb. 1557-8. 3 

Arms of DE SAXHAM : Arg. six cross-crosslets fitchee Gu. a chief indented 
Azure. Of GEDDYNG : Gules, a chevron, Ermine between three eagles' 
heads erased, Or. Of TOPESFIELD : Gules, a chevron, Ermine between 
three martlets Sable. 

LARGE'S MANOR. 

This manor arose out of the division of the fee of Walter de Saxham, 
being that half which passed in 1244 to Thomas de Rushbrook, son of 
Michael and grandson of Scotland de Rushbrook, who held lands in Rush- 
brook of Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, in n8o. 4 

On the death of Thomas de Rushbrook, the manor passed to his sisters 
and coheirs, Agnes, wife of Thomas, father of John Jermyn, of Rushbrook, 
and Isabella, wife of William de Large. 

On the Patent Rolls in 1276 we find notice of an action between Agnes, 
daughter of Michael de Rusebrok, and John Jermeyn, against William 
le Large, touching possessions in Little Saxham, 5 and also on the same 
Rolls the same year of another action by John Germayn against William 
le Large and others. 6 

In 1300 John, son of this William, alone held the manor. 7 In 1301 
William, son of Adam de Sebery, granted to John le Large and Agnes 
his wife the homage and service of Stephen, son of Robert de Hethe, and 
they received subsequently from John, son of Henry de la Hil, and William, 
son of Adam de Risby, homage and service of other tenants. 

In 1309 John le Large and Agnes his wife levied a fine of their lands 
to enure to them and the heirs of Agnes. In 1346 the manor was vested 
in Margery le Large, who was this year assessed in respect of an aid for the 
marriage of the King's daughter. 

In the reign of Rich. II. the manor became vested in Robert de Hethe, 
who then by inheritance had vested in him the main manor, the devolution 

'I.P.M., 23 Hen. VIII., 62. 5 Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. I. 22 (32) (45). 

"I.P.M , 4 and 5 Ph. & M. 54. 6 Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. I. $d. 

3 I.P.M. 4 and 5 Ph. & M. 21. 7 Regist. Pyncebeck, fol. 120. 

"Lib. de Consuet, Monast. S. Edm., fol. 88, 

cited by Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, 

p. 124, note. 



io8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of which has been already given, and from this time the manor has passed 
in the same course as the main Manor of Little Saxham. 

The manor is mentioned by name in the inquis. p.m. of Thomas Lucas, 
25th Sept. 1531 ;' of Edmund Croftes, who died i4th Feb. 1557-8, leaving 
Thomas his son and heir, aged 18;* and of Sir John Croftes, who died 
I5th Jan. I557- 8 - 1 

It is not easy to distinguish the three manors, nor to trace their 
distinctive devolution prior to their vesting in Thomas Lucas. Gage 
informs us that in the 22nd year of Hen. VII. the site of Geddyng's Manor, 
or Topesfeld's, with three houses, contained a rood of land abutting towards 
the west upon the high road ; the site of Large's Manor contained two 
acres and a half, and lay near Large's Wood and Bushy Close ; and the 
site of Grace's contained three acres, lying between Master Nichols's tene- 
ment and another messuage, and abutting upon Little Saxham Heath on 
another side. This can, however, merely refer to the site of the mansion 
or manor house. 

Arms of LE LARGE : Argent, a cock Gules and a chief of the last. 



'I.P.M. 23 Hen. VIII. 72. 'I.P.M., 4 and 5 Ph. & M. 54. 

M.P.M. 4 and 5 Ph. & M. 21. 




WESTLEY. I0 g 

WESTLEY. 

IERE was a holding here at the time of the Survey of the 
Abbot of St. Edmunds. It consisted of n freemen with 
2 carucates of land, and Peter held one of the abbot. There 
were also 5 bordars, 3 ploughteams, ij acres of meadow, 
wood for the maintenance of 3 hogs. These men could 
give and sell their lands, the sac, soc, commendation, and 
service remaining in the abbot's possession. The value was 
305., increased to 405. at the time of the Survey. There was one- 
third share in a church living, with 4 acres of land. It was 7 
quarentenes long and 5 broad, and paid in a gelt 6%d. Others had 
holdings here.' 

Richard, son of Earl Gislebert, had two small holdings here at the time 
of the Survey. The first was formerly that of three freemen under Wisgar, 
by commendation and soc, except the six forfeitures of the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds, and consisted of 80 acres, a bordar, 2 ploughteams, and 2 acres 
of meadow ; also a church living with 8 acres, and wood sufficient for the 
maintenance of 9 hogs ; also two-third shares of a mill valued at ios. J 

The second was formerly that of a freeman under the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds by commendation and soc, and consisted of half a carucate 
of land, 3 acres of meadow, and a ploughteam, valued at ios.' 

WESTLEY MANOR, OTHERWISE SEXTENS OR SEXTINS IN WESTLEY. 

Westley was given by Bishop Alfin, of Elmham, to the monastery of 
St. Edmund, and the chief lordship was, in the reign of William the 
Conqueror, held by the abbot. The Manor of Westley, however, is said 
to have had its origin in a grant made by Gilbert de Clare, son of Richard, 
with the consent and by the gift of his mesne tenant, Reginald, son of 
Ivo, of the services of the freemen Ulwin and Ulmar de Westle, with their 
lands, to the monastery, as prior to this gift the house held nothing here 
in demesne. 

The charter of Gilbert de Clare is to be found in the Regist. Nigrum, 4 
and is given by Gage in his History of Thingoe. 5 The area of the manor 
was considerably enlarged by subsequent grants. Amongst these was 
the grant in the reign of Hen. III. of John, rector of Hengrave. -He 
granted a messuage lying between the toft of the sacrist and the toft of 
Walter le Herberm in Westley, and abutting at one head on the land of 
John de Dunham, and which messuage he had of the gift of Edelina, wife 
of Walmard, son of Robert de Westle. 

In 1281 the two carucates in this parish which belonged to the monastery 
were appropriated by the abbot to the use of the sacrist, hence called 
Sexton's Manor, to which belonged a Court Leet. 

In 1286 the sacrist, according to the return this year of the King's 
Justices in Eyre, held in demesne here 180 acres of land and a windmill. 
The manor remained with the monastery until its devolution, 6 and was, 

'Dom. ii. 3586. 6 Steward of Abbot of Bury 's accounts of 

3 Dom. ii. 391. lands in WestJey in 1363 will be 

3 Dom. ii. 391. found in the Public Record Office. 

*Fol. 114, v- Minister's Accounts, 36 & 37 

s p. 85. Edw. III., Bundle 1007, No. 23. 



no THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

together with the advowson,in 1539 granted by the Crown to Sir Thomas 
Kytson, Knt. 1 

Particulars for this grant will be found in the Record Office, 2 and 
the grant itself on the Onginalia Rolls. 1 

From Sir Thomas Kytson to the death of Sir Thomas Gage, Bart., 
in 1798, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Hengrave, 
in this Hundred. The last-named Sir Thomas Gage was succeeded in the 
lordship by his son and heir, Sir Thomas Gage, who in 1807 sold the same 
to John Stutter. 

The manor described as " The Manor or reputed Manor of Sextons 
in Westley with a Farm consisting of nearly 200 acres of freehold land " was 
advertised to be offered for sale by auction in August or September 1838 
if not previously disposed of by private contract. 4 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Thomas 
Kytson, who died nth Sept. 1540, leaving Thomas his son and heir, 5 and 
a claim by Sir Thomas Kytson to establish right to a sheep course in Westley 
is amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth. 6 

The site of this manor house abutted upon the highway leading from 
Westley to Fornham All Saints near the Newmarket Road. 

MANOR OF LEO'S HALL OR LUCE'S HALL. 

Anselm, Abbot of St. Edmund from 1121 to 1148, granted to Leo and 
his heirs, among other property, the land which he held in Westley of the 
Hall of Fornham, paying quarterly 45. in lieu of all services. There is 
also amongst the Bodleian Charters a grant by Anselm to Leo of a toft in 
St. Edmunds and lands in Westley and Fornham. 7 

Leo was the ancestor of the family of De Hemegrave, and his lands 
in Westley, denominated the Manor of Leo's Hall or Luce's Hall, were 
held together with Hengrave by his descendants until the extinction of 
the male line in the reign of Hen. V. William de Hemegrave was lord in 
the time of Rich. I. He was the son and heir of Leo, and on his death the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas de Hemegrave, Knt. 1 He, 
in 1231, had a grant of free warren here. 9 On his death about 1252," 
the manor passed to his widow Katharine, and as she sued Sir Thomas 
de Hengrave, son of William, and recovered dower, it is most probable 
that the manor on her husband's death had passed to his grandson, Sir 
Thomas de Hengrave." 

He died in 1264, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir Edmund 
Hengrave, and he and his son, John de Hengrave, in 1310 endowed Amy, 
the wife of the latter, daughter of Sir Thomas Grey, Knt., with this manor. 
Sir Edmund de Hengrave died in 1334, and Amy remarried Sir Stephen 
de Cobham, and being again a widow, granted the manor to Sir Edmund 
de Hemegrave, grandson of Sir Edmund, and to Sir Thomas, his son. 

Sir Edmund de Hengrave, the grandson, died in 1379, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas de Hemegrave. He granted a lease 

'Sec Hengrave Manor, in this Hundred; C.P. ii. 122. 

Pat. Rolls, 31 Hen. VIII. pt. ?Bodl. Suff. Ch. i. 

iv. 25. 8 See Manor of Hengrave, in this Hundred. 

"31 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 226. 'Chart. Rolls, 15 Hen. III. 

J Orig. 31 Hen. VIII. 2 Pars. Rot. 312. 10 ? 1263. I.P.M., 48 Hen. III. 21. 

'Ipsunch Journal, 28th July, 1838. " See Manor of Tuddenham, in Lackford 
'I.P.M., 32 Hen. VIII. 63. Hundred. 



WESTLEY. IIt 

of the manor to John Hethe and Amy his wife for their lives at a rent of 
535. ^d., which in 1379 was remitted to them. In 1408 Thomas Hethe 
had a lease of the manor for life, and in 1435 Sir Thomas de Hemegrave 
sold the reversion to the said Thomas Hethe, upon whose decease his 
feoffees, Thomas Geddyng, Hugh Bokenham, Thomas Heigham, and 
Roger Reymes, in 1441 sold the manor, subject to the life interests of 
Anne, widow of the said Thomas Hethe, and Elizabeth Berdewell, his 
daughter, to Humphrey, Earl of Stafford, afterwards Duke of Buckingham. 
Humphrey was slain at the Battle of Northampton in 1460. 

In 1503 the manor was held in dower by Margaret, Countess of Rich- 
mond and Derby, widow of Lord Henry Stafford, who in 1503 leased it, 
with the land called Master Nicholl's and Sir Thomas's, to Thomas Lucas, 
of Little Saxham, for his life at a rent of 6. 6s. 8d. 

In the reign of Hen. VII. Edward Stafford, 1 Duke of Buckingham, 
great-grandson of Humphrey, was restored, and in 1507 he exchanged the 
manor with Thomas Lucas, the lessee, for his Manor of Hanhill or Helion. 

Thomas Lucas died 7th July, 1531," devising the manor by his will 
dated 1st July, 1531, 3 to his 3rd son, John Lucas, of Colchester and of 
Fordham Hall. The inquisition finds that Thomas Barnardeston, Thomas 
Jermyn, and John Harvey were seised of the Manor of Westle called Leoshall 
alias Luceshall, and of 4 messuages, 200 acres of land, 300 acres of pasture, 
8 acres of wood, and 2os. of rent in Westle, Fornham, Great and Little 
Saxham, Ryseby, Ikworth, and Little Hornyngeserth, to the use of Thomas 
Lucas. Further that Thomas Lucas by his last will bequeathed to his son 
John the above manor. The Manor of Leoshall and other messuages were 
found to be held of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and worth 20 per annum. 

John Lucas married 1st Mary, daughter of Abell, of Essex, and 2ndly 
Elizabeth, daughter of George Christmas, of Colchester. He was town 
clerk of Colchester, and Master of the Requests to Edw. VI., and being a 
great gambler won of the Earl of Oxford the wardship of Ray don at dice. 
A fine was in 1551 levied of the manor by John Croftes against the said 
John Lucas and others. 11 Thomas Lucas died I3th Sept. 1556, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Lucas, then aged 22 years. 
Thomas Lucas, the son, was Recorder of Colchester and High Sheriff of 
Essex 1568, and was knighted. He married Mary, daughter of Sir John 
Fermor, of Easton Neston, co. Northampton, Knt., by Maud his wife, 
daughter of Nicholas, Lord Vaux, and died 2Qth Aug. 1611, aged 8o, 5 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Thomas Lucas, High Sheriff 
of Essex in 1617. He married Elizabeth, daughter and coheir of John 
Leighton, of London, and died 25th Sept. 1625. 

His son, John Lucas, was, 3rd Jan. 1644-5, created Baron Lucas, of 
Shenfield, co. Essex, with remainder in default of heirs male of his body 
to Sir Charles Lucas, Knt., his brother, with remainder to Sir Thomas 
Lucas, Knt., a bastard brother in like manner. 

He married Anne, daughter of Sir Christopher Nevill, K.B., of Newton 
St. Lo, in Somerset, and died 2nd July, 1671, aged 65, when he was 

1 See Desning Manor, Gazeley, in Risbridge 'See Saxham Hall Parva Manor, in this 

Hundred. Hundred. 

2 1. P.M., 23 Hen. VIII. 62, in which it is 4 Fine, Mich. 5 Edw. VI. 

stated that Thomas Lucas, son and 5 Will dated 23rd Aug. 1608 ; published 

heir of Jasper, son and heir of ist July, 1611 ; proved 25th Nov. 

deceased, is his heir. 1611, Cant. 



112 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

buried at St. Giles's church, Colchester. He left an only daughter and 
heir Mary, created 7th May, 1663, Baroness Lucas of Crudwell. Her father 
finding he had no male issue obtained the peerage for her two months 
after her marriage to Anthony, nth Earl of Kent. The limitation was 
to her heirs male by the said Earl of Kent, with a special and unique proviso 
" that if at any time or times after the death of the said Mary, Countess 
of Kent, and in default of issue male of her body by the Earl begotten, 
there shall be more persons than one who shall be coheirs of her body by 
the said Earl, so that the King or his heirs might declare which of them 
should have the dignity or otherwise the dignity should be suspended, 
or extinguished, then nevertheless the dignity should not be suspended 
or extinguished, but should go to and be held and enjoyed from time to 
time by such of the said coheirs as by course of descent and the common 
law of the realm should be inheritable in other entire and indivisible 
inheritancy, as namely, an office of honour and public trust, or a castle 
for the necessary defence of the realm and the like, in case such inheritance 
had been given and limited to the said Countess and the heirs of her body 
by the said Earl begotten." 1 

She died 1st Nov. 1702, leaving a son, Henry Grey, Earl of Kent 
and Baron Lucas, who, I4th Nov. 1702, was created Marquess of Kent, &c., 
and 28th April, 1710, Duke of Kent. 

In 1837 tne manor was vested in John Brooks, and in 1847 in William 
Brooks. 

MANOR OF WESTLEY OTHERWISE PEMBROKE al. DUNHAM HALL. 

This was the lordship of Richard Fitz Gilbert in the reign of William the 
Conqueror, and passed to his son and heir, Gilbert de Clare. An account of 
this lord will be found in the account of Sudbury Manor, in Babergh 
Hundred. On Gilbert de Clare's decease the manor passed to his 2nd son, 
Gilbert de Clare, created by King Stephen in 1138 Earl of Pembroke. He 
married Elizabeth, sister of Waleran, Earl of Mellent. 

The Earl of Pembroke was a person of great military prowess, and by 
his valour in the wars in Wales made great acquisitions of territory in that 
part, and amongst others obtained the dominion of Striguil, now Chepstow, 
by which name the title of his Earldom was sometimes denominated. On 
his death in 1149 tne manor passed to his son and heir, Richard de Clare, 
2nd Earl of Pembroke, the celebrated Strongbow, so famous in the conquest 
of Ireland. 

He married Eve, daughter of Dermon M'Murrogh, one of the Kings of 
that country, whereby he acquired considerable property there. He was 
appointed Justice of Ireland by King Hen. II., and died in 1126, leaving an 
only daughter and heir Isabel, who being under age at her father's death, 
became a ward of the King. Dugdale, quoting Leland, says that Strongbow 
was buried in the Chapter House at Gloucester, and adds that he may be 
seen by this inscription on the wall there : 

" Hie jacet Ricardus Strongbow filius Gilberti Comitis de Pembroke." 

Others, however, assert that he was buried at Dublin, and Hacket, in 
his collection of epitaphs, gives the following from the tomb of Strongbow 
at Christ's church, Dublin : 

" Nate ingrate, mihi pugnanti terga dedisti, 
Non mihi, sed genti, regno quoque terga dedisti." 

'Complete Peerage, G.E.C: v. 172. 



WESTLEY. II3 

This alludes to a story, says Banks, that Strongbow's only son a youth 
about seventeen, frighted with the numbers and ululations of the Irish in 
a great battle, ran away; but being afterwards informed of his father's 
victory, he joyfully returned to congratulate him. But the severe general, 
having first upbraided him for his cowardice, caused him to be immediately 
executed, by cutting him off in the middle with a sword. Such in former 
times was the detestation of dastardliness ! '" 

Isabel the daughter married William Marshall, who therefore became 
Earl of Pembroke. The Earl, during the reigns of Rich. I., John, and 
Hen. III., was a person of note, as the annals of the time abundantly 
testify. It has been said of him : " He quelled the Irish, foiled the French, 
and defended Normandy." He died in 1219, and was buried in the Temple 
church, London. His five sons successively followed him in his titles 
and honours, and all dying without leaving issue (the last son Anselm dying 
in 1246) the inheritance of their father became divisible between his five 
daughters and coheirs. 2 

This manor fell to Joan, who married Warine de Montchensy, and on 
their death passed to their daughter and eventual heir Joane, married to 
William de Valence, half-brother by the mother to King Hen. III., by whom 
he was created in 1247, by reason of his marriage, Earl of Pembroke. He 
was slain in France in 1296, leaving a son Aymer and three daughters- 
Isabel, married to John, Lord Hastings ; 3 Joan, to John, Lord Comyn, of 
Badenagh, in Tindale, son of John, Lord Comyn and Mary his wife, 
daughter of JohnBaliol; and Agnes or Anne, married ist to Maurice Fitz 
Gerald, 2ndly to Hugh de Baliol, and srdly to John de Avumes. John, 
Lord Comyn, who married the Earl of Pembroke's daughter, had issue 
John Comyn, slain at Striveling in 1314, and leaving no issue ; William, 
taken prisoner in the same battle, and died without issue ; Joan, married to 
David de Strabolgi, Earl of Athol ; 4 and Elizabeth, married to Richard, 
Lord Talbot. The manor then passed like that of Kentwell Hall, Long 
Melford, in Babergh Hundred. 

Aymer de Valence, 2nd Earl of Pembroke of his name, was murdered 
the 24th June, 1324, while attending Queen Isabel in France, and dying 
without issue his vast estates became divisible between his sisters and 
other families. 5 

The manor was at this time found to consist of a capital messuage 
worth yearly 2s., pigeon house worth half a mark, 200 acres of arable land, 
worth yearly 10, 10 acres of meadow worth 8s., pasture and rush at 
Teynene worth half a mark, liberty of foldage worth one mark, rents of 
assize 45*. 6%d. There was a messuage in the town of Bury St. Edmunds 
belonging to the manor, worth half a mark. The manor was held of the 
Honor of Clare by the service of half a knight's fee. 

This manor was assigned or allotted on partition in 1326, like Kentwell 
Manor, to David de Strabolgi 6 and Joan his wife, 7 and on the death of the 
former, 28th Dec. 1327,' passed to his son and heir David, Earl of Athol. 

1 Banks, iii. 598. David de Hastings, Earl of Athol, 

2 Pat. Rolls, 30 Hen. III. 2. who died in 1269. 

3 See Manor of Monewden, in Loes Hundred. 'I. P.M., 18 Edw. II. 

*He was the son of John, Earl of Athol, 6 See Kentwell Manor, Long Melford, in 
son of David de Strabolgi, Earl of Babergh Hundred. 

Athol, son of John de Strabolgi, 'Close Rolls, 19 Edw. II. 147, 3- 

Earl of Athol, in right of his wife 8 I.P.M., i Edw. III. 85. 
Anda, sole daughter and heir of 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



" This Earl," says Gage, 1 " besides suit and service to the Castle of 
Clare, rendered sixpence to the Abbot of St. Edmunds for sheriff's aid, 
and paid a rent of two shillings to the heirs of Adam de Geddyng ; whence, 
it is concluded, that to the half of a knight's fee which David held of the 
Honor of Clare, had been annexed nine acres of land of the fee of St. Edmund, 
which John de Dunham, in the fourteenth year of Edward I. held of 
Adam de Geddyng by two shillings rent and suit to the Hundred. This 
also may account for the name, which the manor assumed, of Pembroke 
or Dunham Hall." 

David, 1 2th Earl of Athol, being slain 30 th Nov. 1335, the custody of 
the manor was given to the Earl's widow, Katharine, daughter of Henry 
de Beaumont, Earl of Buchan, during the minority of her child David, 
Earl of Athol, aged only 3 years at the death of his father. 1 



On the Rolls of Parliament in 1347 we nn ^ a petition by the Countess 
of Athol praying for redress by reason of the wardship of this manor being 
taken from her. 3 

David de Strabolgi, I3th Earl of Athol, in 1355 accompanied the Black 
Prince into France. He married Catharine or Elizabeth, daughter of 
Henry Ferrers, 2nd Lord Ferrers, of Groby, and died without leaving male 
issue loth Oct. 1375. His daughters Elizabeth and Philippa were his 
coheirs. Elizabeth married 1st Sir Thomas Percy, and 2ndly Sir John 
Scrope, and Philippa was ist the wife of Sir Ralph Percy (brother of Sir 
Thomas), who died without issue, and 2ndly of Sir John Halsham. The 
issue of the last marriage failed in their son, Sir Hugh Halsham, who died 
without issue in 1441. Sir Henry Percy, son and heir of Elizabeth de 
Strabolgi, her ist husband, had two daughters and coheirs Elizabeth, married 
ist to Sir Thomas Burgh, father of Thomas, ist Baron Burgh, K.G., and 
2ndly to Sir William Lucy ; and Margery, married ist to Henry, Lord 
Grey of Codnor, by whom she had no issue, and 2ndly to Sir Richard Vere. 
Davy makes the manor prior to the death of David, I3th Earl of Athol, 
to have passed to Lawrence Hastings, grandson of Isabel, eldest sister and 
coheir of Aymer de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, who had been by letters 
patent, I3th Oct. 1339, declared to be Earl of Pembroke, and he makes 
him to be succeeded on his death in 1348 by his uncle, William de Hastings. 

Davy is supported by an entry we find on the Originalia Rolls, which 
is an order made by King Edw. III. in 1353, committing to John de Chir- 
bury the custody of the manor " which belonged to Laurence de Hastings, 
late Earl of Pembroke," to hold while the heir was under age, at the rent of 
525. 3<f. per annum. 4 And by another entry on the same Rolls eleven 
years later, by which the King committed to John, son and heir of Lawrence 
de Hastings, late Earl of Pembroke, the custody of the manor until the heir 
came of age. 5 And, further, the manor is most certainly included in the 
inquis. p.m. of John de Hastings, Earl of Pembroke in 1419.' 

Gage does not attempt to trace the devolution of the manor at this 
point ; he merely says : " In the 24th year of Edw. Ill [1350] on the death 
of William de Hastings, 7 it was found that he held the Manor of Westley 
for his life. This manor subsequently belonged to the Crown, probably 



'Hist, of Thingoe Hundred, p. 88. 
'Originalia, 10 Edw. III. 10. 
R.P. ii. 181. 
4 Originalia, 26 Edw. III. 5. 



5 Originalia, 37 Edw. III. 3. 

6 1. P.M., 6 Hen. V. 29. 

7 1. P.M., 24 Edw. III. 8. 



WESTLEY. 1I5 

through the attainder of the Percies, one of whom married a coheir of the 
Earl of Athol, the grandson. 1 

It is clear that King Edw. IV. gave the manor in 1463, ist to William 
Neville, Earl of Kent, and the heirs male of his body, 2 and on the death of 
the Earl the same year, gth Jan. 1463, gave the same to George, Duke of 
Clarence, his brother, in tail. 3 

Upon his attainder the manor reverted to the Crown, and was exchanged 
in 1479, with John, Lord Howard, afterwards Duke of Norfolk, for Dalling- 
ham, in Cambridgeshire. The grant is on the Patent Rolls, 18 Edw. IV., 
and is in tail male. It is of the " Manor of Wostle al. Downham Halle in 
Westle" with knights' fees, advowspns, &c., "late of George late Duke 
of Clarence in the King's hands by his forfeiture " 4 

The Duke of Norfolk forfeited the manor on his attainder in 1485, and 
King Hen. VII. granted it to his uncle, Jasper Tudor, then Duke of Bedford, 
the son of Owen Tudor, by Katherine his wife, widow of Hen. V., and mother 
of Hen. VI., which Jasper had been created Earl of Pembroke in 1452. 
He died in 1495 without issue, when the manor reverted to the Crown, 
subject to the estate for life granted by Jasper, Duke of Bedford, to Thomas 
Lucas, in 1490, and confirmed by the King and his successor Hen. VIII. 
In 1510 the manor was granted to Thomas Lucas. 5 Davy and Gage 
state that in 1531 John, Lord Russell, afterwards Earl of Bedford, had a 
lease of the manor for 21 years at the rent of 1135. 4^., and the accounts 
of " John, lord Rusell lord Admiral " " farmer of Westley," will be found 
amongst the State Papers for 1541.' In 1543 a grant to him of the Manor 
would seem to have been then under consideration, for there are still pre- 
served in the Record Office, particulars of the farm of the manor taken this 
year for such a grant. 7 However this may be, it is clear that on the death 
of Thomas Lucas the manor was in 1543 granted in fee to Lord Russell, 
who thereupon conveyed it to Edmund Markant and Elizabeth his wife 
and his heirs by the service of the twentieth part of a knight's fee. 

In 1548 William Markant appears to have held the manor, and in 1571 
a suit was instituted in Chancery by Edmund (? Edward) Markant, then 
owner of the estate, against Sir Thomas Kytson and others touching the 
extent of a right of sheepwalk in Westley and other claims made by 
Markant. 8 

In 1613 John Markant held the manor, for this year he had licence 
to alienate it to Thomas Holmes and Benjamin Wilson, probably as trustees, 
for in 1620 Leonard Tillott and Anthony Adam released to this John Markant 
then described as " of Colchester, gent.," all right in this property. This 
same year, however, it seems to have passed to George Markant, who had 
licence to alienate to Thomas Smyth. Seven years later we find the manor 
vested in the Rev. Robert Warren, of Long Melford, who joined with John 
his son in 1657 in selling the same to Lady Penelope Gage. It was settled 
by her in 1661 upon her grandson, Francis Gage, who in 1693 sold it to 
Sir Thomas Hervey, on whose death the following year it passed to his son 
and heir, John Hervey, created Earl of Bristol, and from that time to the 

'Gage, Hist, of Thingoe, p. 89, citing as 4 Pat. Rolls, 18 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 27. 

his authority Dugdale's Baronetage, 3 S.P. 2 Hen. VIII. 1125. 

vol. ii. p. 96. 6 S.P. 1541, 744. 

'Pat. Rolls, 2 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 7. '35 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 10 App. ii. p. 263. 

3 Pat. Rolls, 2 Edw. IV. pt. ii. 6 ; 14 Edw. sC.P., ii. 245. 

IV. pt. i. 5- 



u6 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

present the manor has descended in the same course as the Manor of 
Ickworth, in this Hundred. 

Arms of PEMBROKE : Or, three chevrons, Gules or label of five points, 
Az. 

FRESEL'S MANOR. 

In 1286 Walter Fresel, of Great Saxham, held of the Abbot of St. 
Edmunds in demesne a messuage and 46 acres of land in the parish of 
Westley by $2d. yearly, and suit to the Hundred, and these were tenants 
under the said Walter. The manor in 1548 belonged to John Page, and then 
consisted of 180 acres, part of which was holden of the Honor of Clare. 
On John Page's death the manor passed to his son and heir, Edward Page. 

A fine of the manor was levied in 1553 by John Holt and others against 
the said Edward Page, probably on the occasion of some settlement. 1 
Edward Page died without issue, when the manor passed to his sister and 
heir Mary, married to John Cropley. 

He conveyed the manor in 1569 to Clement Paman/ but probably 
by way of settlement or mortgage, for we find that in 1623 Thomas Wing- 
field and William Bloomfield, in consideration of one thousand marks, and 
John Cropley in consideration of 688. 6s. 8d., conveyed it to Roger 
Houghton. 

The assurance was not only of the site of the manor, but also of 160 
acres of land with certain cottages. From Roger Houghton the manor 
passed to his son and heir, John Houghton, M.D., whose will is dated 22nd 
June, 1672. He married Bridget, daughter of Thomas Cracherode, but 
died without issue, when the manor devolved on his nephew and heir, John 
Houghton, the son and heir of his brother Roger. He married Elizabeth 
Caseborneand died in the month of September, 1718, when the manor vested 
in his son and heir, Roger Houghton, who in 1735 sold it to Elizabeth Gage, 
of Coldhall Hall, in Stanningfield, widow of John, younger son of Sir William 
Gage, Bart., who acquired the manor for her son, the Rev. John Gage, who 
by his will dated 7th Aug. 1788, gave the same to the Rev. Joseph Tate, 
of Bury St. Edmunds. 



'Fine, Easter, 7 Edw. VI: 'Fine, Easter, n Eliz.- 




WHEPSTEAD. 1I7 

WHEPSTEAD. 

IWO manors were held here in the time of the Confessor, and 
also when the Survey was taken by the Abbot of St. Edmunds. 
The first consisted of 5 carucates of land, 10 villeins, 18 
bordars, 4 ploughteams in demesne and 6 belonging to' the 
men, also 9 slaves, 10 acres of meadow, wood sufficient for 
the support of 40 hogs, 5 rouncies at the time of the Survey, 
18 beasts, 30 hogs, and 100 sheep. Also a socman with 
30 acres of land, a bordar, i slave, i ploughteam, 2 acres of meadow, and 
wood sufficient for 5 hogs. Over these the Abbot of St. Edmunds had 
sac, soc, and commendation, and all customs, and without hfe licence the 
socman could not give or sell the land. Another holding of the abbot was 
of six freemen with a carucate and a half of land (which at the time of the 
Survey was held by Ralph, except 30 acres), 4 bordars, 3 ploughteams,^ 
acres of meadow, wood sufficient for 3 hogs, valued at 505. The Survey 
adds : "These men could give and sell their land, but sac and soc, commen- 
dation and service would remain to the abbot ; always valued at 6os." 
There was a church living with 30 acres of free land. This manor (the 
freemen not included) was, in the time of the Confessor, valued at 7, but 
at the time of the Survey at 10. It was 9 quarentenes long and 8 broad, 
and paid in a gelt 2od.' 

There are three other holdings in this place entered under " Manston " 
in the Survey. The first was of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, and consisted 
of a socman with 20 acres, i bordar, half a ploughteam, i acre of meadow, 
and wood sufficient for the maintenance of 2 hogs. Over him the abbot had 
sac and soc and commendation, and he owed the abbot service, not being 
able to give or sell the lands without the licence of the abbot. The whole 
tenancy was at the time of the Survey held of the abbot by one Garin, and 
was valued both in Saxon and Norman times at 45. It was 3 quarentenes 
long and 2\ broad, and paid in a gelt 6d. Others had holdings here. 2 

The second holding under this head was that of Richard, son of Earl 
Gislebert, and formerly that of a freeman under Wisgar and in his soc. 
It consisted of half a carucate of land, 3 bordars (reduced to i at the time 
of the Survey), a ploughteam (reduced at the time of the Survey to half 
a team), and 2 acres of meadow valued at ios. 3 

The third holding was a small one of Suane, of Essex, consisting of 
a socman with 20 acres, a bordar, half a ploughteam, and an acre of meadow, 
valued at 5$. 4 

MANOR OF WHEPSTEAD HALL. 

The land comprised in this manor was given by Theodred, Bishop of 
London, to the monastery of St. Edmund in 662, and it was vested in the 
abbot at the time of Edward the Confessor, when the estate consisted of 
5 carucates of land then held as a manor. At the time of the Survey there 
were six freemen upon a carucate and a half held by Ralph, and 3 acres of 
land more. 

The manor was comprised in a lease granted in 1202 by Sampson the 
Abbot to Benedict de Blakeham, and an extent taken of the manor in 1255 

'Dom. 11.358. J Dom. 11. 3916. 

'Dom. ii. 358. 4 Dom. 11. 401. 



n8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

shows that at that date the monastery held a messuage and 445 acres of 
land, and 22 acres of meadow and pasture, and 232 acres of wood, with 
free warren and other rights. Between 1255 and 1287 the monastery 
acquired further property in \Vhepstead, and by the latter date held a 
messuage and 445 acres of land, 22 of meadow and pasture, 212 of wood, 
besides 108 acres of land and 4 acres of meadow and pasture purchased in 
parcels. They also held 415 acres which their villeins had with their 
messuages and 18 acres in the hands of the cottariiof the great Survey, 
and until the dissolution of that house, when it passed to the Crown. 

In 1539 a grant was made of the manor in consideration of 819. us. 
to Sir William Drury, Knt., of Hawstead, of the manor and the advowson of 
the church, to be held in fee by the service of the twentieth part of a knight's 
fee and the yearly rent of 275. 6d., subject to a lease subsisting in favour of 
Thomas Mounynge and Margaret his wife for 20 years at the rent of 36. 45. 

Particulars for this grant will be found in the Record Office, 1 and the 
grant itself is on the Originalia Rolls. 2 It is also mentioned in the State 
Papers the following year. 1 From the time of Sir William Drury to the 
death of Sir Robert Drury in 1615 the manor passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Hawstead, in this Hundred. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1597 by George Myllers against Sir 
Robert Drury and others. 4 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
we find an action to establish a devise by James Iveson, clerk, against 
Thomas Grigges as to copyholds held of Sir Robert Drury as of this manor, 
late the estate of Henry Greggs deceased, who devised the same to 
plaintiff. 5 

In 1594 a fine was levied of the manor by Lionel Sharpe against Sir 
Robert Drury and others. 6 

On the death of Sir Robert Drury in 1615 the manor passed to his 
sisters and coheirs, and on the partition of the Drury estates between these 
coheirs in 1618 this manor was allotted as part of the share of Diana, and 
was limited to her and her husband, Sir Edward Cecil, created in 1625 
Baron Cecil of Putney, and in 1626 Viscount Wimbledon in strict settlement. 

Diana died in 1631, and Viscount Wimbledon died i6th Nov. 1638, 
having had by Diana an only child Anne, who died in infancy. The manor 
passed to Elizabeth, Countess of Exeter, sister of Diana, and on her death 
the 2Oth Feb. 1654, passed under the residuary devise contained in her 
will dated 2Oth March, 1650, to her grandson Thomas, Lord Grey, of Groby, 
who in the month of Nov. the same year, in consideration of 58. 45. joined 
in a sale of the manor and advowson of Whepstead with other property 
to Sir Henry W f ood, Knt., of Loudham, in Wilford Hundred. He 
died in 1671, 7 when the manor passed to his only sister and heir Mary, 
married to Charles, Duke of Cleveland. She died in 1680 without issue, 
and he in 1730, when the manor passed to Mary's cousin and heir, Chanles 
Wood, al. Cranmer, who died without issue in 1743. 

'31 Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 202. Fine, Trin. 36 Eliz. 

'Orig. 31 Hen. VIII. 2 Pars. Rot. 205. 7 See Manor of Dunningworth, in Plomes- 
S S.P. 1540, 282 (116) gate Hundred, and Staverton, in 

4 Fine, Trin. 39 Eliz. Eyke, in Loes Hundred. 

5 C.P. ii. 97. 



WHEPSTEAD. II9 

In 1747, in pursuance of the Commission under the Great Seal, partition 
was made of the estates of Sir Henry Wood, as mentioned in the account 
of the Manor of Blythford, in Blything Hundred, under which partition 
carried into effect by a deed dated 5th Dec. 1747, this manor was included 
in the property allotted to Penelope Lee, one of the coheirs of Mary Cranmer, 
sister of Sir Henry Wood, and wife of Timothy Lee, of Ackworth, in the 
County of York. 1 

In the following year, 1748, Joshua Grigby, 2 of Bury St. Edmunds, 
became the purchaser of the estate of Penelope Lee, with the exception of 
the advowson of the church and of the parsonage closes. By his will, 
dated the 26th April, 1770", he devised it to his son and heir Joshua until 
the testator's grandson, Joshua Grigby, should attain 24 years of age, and 
then to him in fee. In 1795 the grandson, by deed dated 7th and 8th May, 
sold the manor and all his lands here (except Plumpton Farm) to Charles, 
Earl and afterwards ist Marquis Cornwallis, who in 1800 sold the same 
to General Sir Thomas Hammond, who had previously purchased the 
Plumpton estate from Joshua Grigby. 

Francis Thomas Hammond, who is apparently referred to as Sir Thomas 
Hammon, resided at Plumpton Hall, and was a man of some note. He 
was a Knight of the Grand Cross of Hanover and of the Royal Order of 
Wirtemburg, first Equerry to King Geo. IV., Lieutenant-Governor of 
Edinburgh, and General of the Forces. He married Louisa, daughter of 
Admiral Sir Richard King, Bart., and had an only child, Geprgina Augusta 
Frances, who died 25th Oct. 1824, aged 16, and was buried at Dupplin 
Castle, in Scotland. After his death the trustees of Sir Thomas Hammond 
seem to have disposed of the manor, which in 1855 was vested in Sir William 
Foster, Bart., of Norwich. 

In 1885 it was vested in Richard Newman, of Hadleigh, and is now 
vested in Charles James Grimwade, of Hadleigh. 

Arms of HAMMOND : Argent, on a chevron Sable, between three 
ogresses, each charged with a martlet of the field, three escallops Or, all 
within a bordure engrailed Vert. 

MANOR OF DOVETON HALL OR DORRINGTON HALL OR DUFFIN HALL. 

Alexander, son of Philip de Welnetham, granted his messuage called 
Dovyton to Hugh de la Ryver, clerk, son of William Everard, who endowed 
with the same the Hospital of St. John the Evangelist called God's House, 
without the south gate of St. Edmunds, Bury, and Thomas Everard, brother 
and heir of this Hugh, in 1292 released all right in Doveton to John, Abbot 
of St. Edmunds. 

On the Dissolution the messuage, with the lands which had during 
its pious holding blossomed into a manor, was in 1545 granted by the Crown 
to Sir George Somerset, of Badmondisfield, younger son of the Earl of 
Worcester. He, three years later, sold to Thomas Bacon and others, who 
by deed dated ist Nov. 1550, sold the same to Roger Frost. He died in 
1566,* when the manor passed to his grandson, John Frost, son of John, 
son of Roger, who had livery in 1592, and levied a fine of the manor in 1633.* 
On John Frost's death the manor passed under his will, dated 28th Dec. 

'Certain woods in Brockley, parcel of the 3 I.P.M., 10 Eli/. 46. His will is dated 
Manor of Whepstead, were allotted 2oth Feb. 1566, and was proved at 

to Dorothy Robinson. Norwich loth March following. 

2 SeeLeffeyHallManor,inBuxhall, in Stow 4 g Chas. I. pt. xii. 13. 
Hundred. 



120 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

1652 (proved at Westminster before Commissioners 2oth Sept. following), 
to his nephew, heir and devisee, John Frost, and the executors and trustees 
under his will dated 2oth Aug. 1688, proved at Bury St. Edmunds, sold 
the manor in 1702 to John Hervey, 1st Earl of Bristol, from whom the same 
has descended in the same course as the Manor of Ickworth, in this Hundred, 
and is now vested in the Marquis of Bristol. 

Deeds of the I5th century relating to this manor from the Register of 
the " Domus Dei," near Bury St. Edmunds, will be found amongst the 
Arundel MSS. 1 

Amongst the Chancery Papers in the Public Record Office we find 
livery of lands parcel of this manor to Richard Haywood, son of Nicholas, 
in 1631,* and the same year livery of the manor called " Duston al. Dov- 
ington Hall," in Whepstead, was made to " John Fort, son of John." J 
This is probably a misreading for " Frost," but the relationship does not 
agree. 

Arms of FROST : A chevron between three trefoils slipt. 

CAGE'S MANOR OR OVER CAGE HALL. 

This small manor seems to have belonged to the Abbot of St. Edmunds, 
of whom one Richard Cage held lands in 1246. In 1286 another Richard 
Cage held 3 acres in Whepstead of the abbot by the render of two semes of 
malt, and the manor.no doubt derived its name from this family. It 
ultimately was held by the monastery in possession, and was part of the 
estate which at its dissolution was granted to Sir William Drury. 4 

From the time of the grant in 1539 to 1748 the manor, or reputed manor, 
seems to have devolved in the same course as the Manor of Whepstead Hall, 
and in 1837 was vested in the Rev. James Dewhurst Sprigge, rector of 
Brockley. 

MANOR OF MANSION HALL. 

This manor is mentioned in the Domesday Survey, but not in connection 
with the parish of Whepstead, to which Manston is now a hamlet, though 
for ecclesiastical purposes Manston was taken to belong to the parish of 
Whepstead, but its tithes were early appropriated to the monastery of St. 
John the Baptist, at Colchester. 

The land, of which the Abbot of St. Edmunds was chief lord, became 
early vested in a family bearing the name of this place. Eric de Manston 
is the first of whom we have any information. He was succeeded by his 
son and heir, Goldewin de Manston. 

According to the Liber de Consuetudinibus, three suits were due from 
Manston to the Hundred Court, namely, in respect to the land of Goldewin 
de Manston, of Rodbert, and John ; and Goldewin is stated to hold half 
a knight's fee of the abbot. On Goldewin's death the manor passed to 
his son and heir, John de Manston. In 1197 Arbert or Wibert de Manston 
acknowledged before the King's justices in Westminster that he held of 
Sampson, Abbot of St. Edmunds, a fourth part of a knight's fee in Manston. 
In 1205 the manor was vested in Richard, son of John de Manston, who 
brought an action against Richard de Ikeworth and Sibilla his wife, daughter 
of John de Manston, for the recovery of a carucate of land in Manston 

'Arundel i. J Chancery, D.K.R. 48 App. p. 488. 

'Chancery, D.K.R. 43 App. i. p. 182. 3i Hen. VIII. D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 202. 



WHEPSTEAD. I2I 

which Margaret his mother held for 10 years and upwards with the said 
Richard in ward after the death of John, his father. 

Richard and Sibilla pleaded that John de Manston had given to them 
in frank marriage all his lands in Manston, as of his purchase, and had 
confirmed the same by his deed ; and that John and Margaret were never 
seised afterward, except for a term of years at a rent of 2os. yearly, payable 
by Thomas, brother of John de Manston. 

The Abbot of Colchester having been summoned by Richard de 
Ickworth to do homage for a free tenement belonging to him in Manston, 
pleaded that the lands were in dispute between Richard de Manston and 
Richard de Ickworth, and refused to do homage until he knew to which 
of them it was of right due.' 

In the time of Hen. III. the manor was probably held by Philip de 
Ikeworth. 2 In 1244 Alice de Brockley accounted for one-fourth of a fee 
here held of the Abbot of St. Edmunds, apparently part of the Manston fee. 
In 1346 Alexander de Manston married the heiress of Henry de Brockley 
and held the manor in her right, the same on their decease devolving on 
their daughter Agnes. In 1349 William, Abbot of St. Edmunds, gave to 
Agnes, late wife of Richard de Manston, and Robert de Kettleston, rector 
of Brockley, the wardship and marriage of Agnes, daughter of Alexander 
de Manston, and heir of Henry de Brockley, and this property descended 
to John de Brockley, who in 1428 was seised thereof. 

In the early part of the i6th century the manor became vested in the 
Sturgeon family, and Roger Sturgeon, of Whepstead, died seised of it in 
I 55 I , when it passed to his son, John Sturgeon. Roger's will is dated 
6th Sept. 1547, an d it was proved at Bury St. Edmunds 6th Dec. 1551. 
By it he ordered 35. 4^. to be distributed on the day of his burial to the poor 
of Whepsted, and 13^. to the poor of Brockley, giving two milk cows to the 
churchwardens to be let for the use of the poor. He bequeathed to Agnes 
his wife, and after her death to her youngest son, John Sturgeon, his leases 
from the late dissolved monastery of St. Edmunds, of Over Cage's tene- 
ment, and Gywerd Cage's house ; and bequeathed to his eldest son John 
his lease under the seal of the late monastery of St. John, Colchester, of a 
portion of tithe in Whepsted, and gave specific legacies to each of his sons 
Roger and Thomas, and his daughters Anne, wife of William Bulbroke ; 
Amy, wife of Henry Hunt, and Joan, wife of Robert Frost, appointing his 
wife executrix, and Sir Thomas Jermyn supervisor, with a legacy of 405. 
for his pains. 3 

On John Sturgeon's death the manor passed to his son and heir, John 
Sturgeon, who married Margaret, daughter of John Roberts, of North 
Walsham, co. Norfolk, and on his death the manor devolved on his son and 
heir, Roger Sturgeon, who married Susanna, daughter of Francis Bugg, of 
Pakenham, and dying was buried at Whepsted loth Nov. 1684, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Roger Sturgeon, who married ist Anne, 
daughter of John Howe, of Brockley, and 2ndly Katharine. He died in 
1690, and was buried at Wherstead 27th May that year. His son and heir 
was James Sturgeon, but it seems he did not inherit, for on the marriage 
in 1670 of Roger Sturgeon with Ann Howe the family property was by deed 
dated 5th July, 1670, limited to the issue in special tail, and devolved on 

'Abbr. of Pleas, 7 and 8 John, 6; Gage's 'I.P.M., 1. Hen. III. 164.- 

Hist, of Thingoe, p. 383. 'Cage's Hist, of. Thingoe, p. 384- 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Elizabeth and Susan, the two daughters of the marriage, to the exclusion 
of their half-brother, James Sturgeon, the eldest son and heir of his father 
by his 2nd marriage. He, however, subsequently repurchased the estate 
from his cousin, James Sturgeon, of Bury St. Edmunds, who had acquired 
it from Elizabeth and Susan. 

He married Elizabeth Sanderson, and on his death was succeeded 
by his son and heir, James Sturgeon, who married Susanna, daughter of 
Matthew Simpson, of Rede, and on his death the manor passed to his son 
and heir,a third consecutive James Sturgeon, who married Susanna Simpson,' 
who remarried George Chinnery, of Bury St. Edmunds. This James 
Sturgeons will was proved in the court of the Archdeaconry of Sudbury 
i6th Feb. 1784. He left two daughters his coheirs Susan, wife of the Rev. 
William Erat Sims, of Nayland, and Sarah, wife of Ezekiel Sparke, of 
Bury St. Edmunds, and under a partition between them and the will of 
their father the Manor of Manston came to the Sims family, who in 1836 
sold the same to John Jackson, solicitor, of Bury St. Edmunds. 

Mr. Jackson married Sarah, daughter of the above-named Ezekiel 
Sparke and Sarah his wife (late Sturgeon). 

The manor was in 1896 held by George Mainprice, of Soham, Cam- 
bridge, but is now held by Thomas Bower. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings of the time of Queen Elizabeth 
is an action by William Harryson to enforce a security against Roger 
Sturgeon as to 2 acres -held of the manor surrendered to John Sturgeon, 
defendant's father, in trust to secure a debt to plaintiff/ 

The Manston Hall property consists of 151 acres, of which 463. 2r. 
called Hawk's Farm, belong to the manor and parish of Whepstead, the 
residue is taken to be parcel of the Manor of Manston. The hall is a moated 
farmhouse, and stands on the north side of the road leading to Lawshall, 
on the opposite side of the road to Duffield's. 

Arms of MANSTON : Gules a fesse Ermine, between three mullets 
pierced Or. Of STURGEON : Azure three sturgeons nainant, in pale Or, 
over all fretty, Gules. 



'But query, though Gage has " Susanna." "C.P. i. 408. 



THREDLING HUNDRED. 



HIS is the smallest Hundred in the County. It is in the 
Deanery of Clay don, Archdeaconry of Suffolk, and Diocese 
of Norwich. The river Deben has its source in this 
Hundred, which is bounded on the west and south by Bos- 
mere and Claydon Hundred ; on the north by that of 
Hartismere ; and on the east by Loes. The fee of the 
Hundred is in the Crown, and the government in the Sheriff and 
his officers. It contains 9,943 acres, in five parishes and 15 manors, as 
follows : 




Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 


Ashfield .... 


Ashfield with Thorpe. 


Framsden . . 


Framsden. 




Crow's Hall al. Wood- 
ward's. 
Ulveston Hall. 


Pettaugh .... 


Pettaugh Hall. 
Abbot's Hall. 
Woodward's. 


Debenham . . 


Debenham Priory. 
Bludhall. 
Sackville's. 
Harborough Hall cum 
Aspall or cum 
Debenham. 


Winston .... 


Winston Hall or 
Winston cum Pul- 
ham. 
Bocking Hall. 




Giesting al. Gosting's 
Hall al. Gostelens 








Hall. 








Scotnetts with the 








Haugh. 








i2 4 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ASHFIELD. 

HERE were two manors in this place in Saxon times. The 
largest was that of Godman, a freeman, under commendation 
to Robert Malet's predecessor, and consisted of 30 acres, 
a bordar, a ploughteam which later disappeared but settled 
at half a team by the time of the Survey. The value was 
IDS. At the time of the Survey the manor was held of 
Hervey de Bern by Ranulf, the soc belonging to the abbot 

and to Hugh's predecessor. William Malet was seised of this manor on 

the day of his death. 

Hervey de Berri only had here 2 acres valued at 4^., formerly held by 
a freeman, the soc belonging to the abbot. 1 

The other manor was held by Brictmar, a freeman, and consisted of 
24 acres and a ploughteam, he being valued at 55. In the same township 
were four freemen with 27 acres and a ploughteam, valued at 35. When 
the Survey was taken there was only half a team, and the manor and 
estate were held by Earl Alan." 

Robert Malet had two estates in this place at the time of the Survey. 
The first was held of him by Gilbert, and consisted of 15 acres and half a 
ploughteam, valued at 55., the soc belonging to the abbot and Earl Hugh. 
It had formerly been held by three freemen under commendation. The 
second consisted of 20 acres, formerly held by Turbin, who could not sell. 
They were included in the valuation of Soham ; the soc belonged to the 
abbot and Earl Hugh. 3 

Another holding in this place was that of Saurin, the priest, a freeman 
in the abbot's soc and commendation, and consisted of 30 acres, 2 bordars, 
and a ploughteam, valued at IDS. The Survey goes on to say : "Of this 
priest Walter de Dol was seised when he forfeited his land, and Earl Hugh 
was seised later as the Hundred bears witness. And Norman says that the 
King sent him a writ that he should deliver seisin to Ralph de Savigni of 
all the freemen over whom Hubert de Port had delivered seisin to the Bishop ; 
and so Norman delivered seisin of this priest to Ralph ; but still he does 
not know if Hubert had formerly delivered seisin of him to the bishop. 
And the King's Barons when they came into the county found him in peace 
(?) between Roger Bigot and Earl Hugh, and so he shall remain in peace 
until his case be decided." The Domesday tenant was the Bishop of 
Bayeux. 4 

The Bishop of Ely had a small holding here when the Survey was taken, 
consisting of 3 acres valued at 8^., formerly the estate of a freeman by soc 
and commendation. 5 

Another holding here was that of Humphrey, the Chamberlain, con- 
sisting of 4 acres valued at 8d., formerly the estate of two freemen, the soc 
belonging to the abbot. 6 

There is an entry in the Survey of Thorpe included with Ashfield. It 
consisted of a carucate of land and 14 acres, held in the Confessor's time by 
21 freemen under commendation to Earl Hugh's predecessor. There was 
a church with 12 acres. The details and stock of the estate, of which the 
soc was half the abbot's and half the Earl's, were as follows : 3 ploughteams, 

'Dora. ii. 441. 4 Dom. ii. 377. 

*Dom. ii. 295. *Dom. ii. 384. 

J Dom. ii. 306. 9 Dom. ii. 434. 



ASHFIELD. I25 

3 acres of meadow, wood sufficient for 12 hogs, and the value was 4 os. By 

jime of the Survey the value had come down to 3 os., and there were 
but two ploughteams. Ashfield is stated to have been a league long and 
7 quarentenes broad, and it paid in a gelt 2 od. This estate was at the time 
the Survey held by Hugh, son of Norman, of Earl Hugh. 

In Thorpe itself, which is a hamlet of Ashfield, there are one or two 
estates enumerated in the Survey. Earl Hugh held here 10 acres valued 
t 2s. which had been held by Oslac, a freeman under commendation. 

Amongst the lands of Robert Malet we find four entries The first 
consisted of 16 acres held of him by Walter, and valued at 35. It had 
formerly been held by Godwin, a freeman under commendation when it 
was valued at 32^. This land was in the Bedingfield Manor, and the soc 
belonged to the abbot. A second consisted of 3 acres valued at lod 
the soc being in the abbot and Earl Hugh. It was held by a freeman under 
commendation in Saxon times, but at the time of the Survey by Gilbert 
of Earl Hugh. The third consisted of 5 acres and a team of 2 oxen, valued 
at -Ltd., of which the Abbot of Ely had the soc. This was formerly held by 
a freeman under commendation with half a ploughteam, but at the time of 
the Survey by Tiger of Earl Hugh. The fourth was held by William 
Gulafra of the Earl, the abbot having the soc. It consisted of 10 acres 
valued at 20^., and was formerly held by a freeman under commendation. 

The Abbot of St. Edmunds held 6 acres valued at J.6d., formerly held 
by two freemen under commendation, the said abbot having the soc over 
one and the Abbot of Ely over the other. 

The only other holding in Thorpe was that of the Abbot of Ely, who 
had an estate of 10 acres valued at 20^., formerly held by Alsey, a freeman, 
by soc and commendation. 

ASHFIELD MANOR WITH THORPE. 

The two small manors of Saxon times no doubt were soon united. 
Ivo de Kenton 1 was lord in 1313, in which year he died, 2 when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Nigel de Kenton, who died in 1322, when it went 
to his son and heir, Ivo de Kenton, who died in 1355. 3 In the Davy MSS. 
it is queried whether Robert de Montalt was not lord in 1316, but in any 
case it is clear that the manor passed about this time 4 to Butley priory, 
and on the dissolution of that house vested in the Crown. Particulars for 
the grant of this manor previous to the assurance of it to Francis Fram- 
lingham in 1542 will be found in the Public Record Office. 5 

Francis Framlingham died seised 2Oth Sept. I544- 6 The Framlingham 
family had long been connected with this parish. A John Framlingham, 
who died in 1425, was buried in the church here with his wife Margaret. 
Davy, in his Suffolk Collections, has Lionel Talemach down as lord in 1548, 
but adds " perhaps only trustee." Probably the surmise is correct. Davy 
had no doubt come across the entry on the Memoranda Rolls for this year 

1 See Manor of Kenton, in Loes Hundred. to Humphrey, Earl of Stafford, Sir 

"I.P.M., 7 Edw. II. 2. Thomas Tudenham, Robert Caun- 

3 I.P.M., 29 Edw. III. i. dyssh, and Nicholas Drury and their 

4 There is a licence on the Patent Rolls heirs. 13 Hen. VI. 27. 

in 1435 for Richard Bosoun to 5 D.K.R. 9 App. ii. p. 210. 
grant the manor, one acre excepted, 6 I.P.M., 37 Hen. VIII. 92. 



126 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

where Lionel Talmage and wife are called upon to show under what title 
they hold this manor. 1 

Sir Charles Framlingham, Knt., was lord in 1546," and the manor 
passed on his death to his grandson, Framlingham Gawdy, who was 
succeeded by his brother, Sir Charles Gawdy, Knt., who died I3th Dec. 
1629,' and from this time to the present the manor has passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Crow's Hall, in Debenham, in this Hundred, 
and Great Thornham, in Hartismere Hundred, and is now vested in Lord 
Henniker. 



'Memo. Rolls, Hil. Rec. Rot. 42. 'I. P.M., xytli March, 1629-30. 

'See Manor of Crow's Hall, Debenham, in 
this Hundred. 



DEBENHAM. I27 

DEB EN HAM. 

HREE manors were held here in Saxon times. The first 
was held by Edric, a freeman under commendation to Malet's 
predecessor, and consisted of a carucate of land in the 
abbot's soc, 16 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 3 
belonging to the men, 4 acres of meadow, wood enough to 
support 60 hogs, also a rouncy, 4 beasts, 40 hogs, 30 sheep, 
and 40 goats. 

At the time of the Survey this manor was held of Robert Malet by 
William Gulafra, and some of the details had changed. There was only 
one team and a half belonging to the men, wood but sufficient to support 
40 hogs, and 6 beasts, 20 hogs, 45 sheep, and 28 goats. There were also 
30 acres of demesne in another Hundred. The value of the whole estate 
was 66s., reduced to 505. at the time of the Survey. The soc belonged to 
the abbot. 1 




^ second manor was held by Godwi, a freeman under commendation 
to Sachs, and consisted of 40 acres, 2 bordars, a ploughteam, and an acre 
of meadow. Also the fourth part of a church, Saint Mary's, with 10 
acres, valued at 205., the soc belonging to the Abbot of Ely. There was 
also three-fourth parts of a church, St. Andrew's, with ij acres, and the 
fourth part of a church, Saint Mary's, with 10 acres. The Domesday tenant 
was the Bishop of Bayeux. 2 

The third manor was held by Sachs, and consisted of a carucate of 
land and 22 acres; of these 22 acres Robert Malet's predecessor had 8 acres 
in the abbot's soc and commendation. There were also 4 villeins, 19 
bordars, a serf, and 2 ploughteams in demesne. Also the third part of 
St. Mary's church, with 10 acres, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 3 belonging 
to the men, 4 acres of meadow, wood enough to support 100 hogs, a rouncy, 
4 beasts, 40 hogs, 27 goats, and 4O-sheep. Also 30 acres of demesne land 
in the Hundred of Loes, the value of the whole being 6os. At the time of 
the Survey Ralph de Savigni held this manor under Ranulf Peverell, and some 
of the details had changed. There were only 2 villeins, the serf and the 
rouncy had disappeared, the ploughteams belonging to the men were 
reduced to 2, there was wood enough to support 40 hogs only ; there 
were 28 hogs and 30 sheep, while the value was but 505. 3 

Robert Malet, besides this manor, had several other holdings here at 
the time of the Survey. 

The first was formerly that of six freemen under commendation to 
Edric, and consisted of 36 acres, 2 ploughteams (reduced to i teams when 
the Survey was taken) and an acre of meadow, valued at IDS. (reduced to 
6s. at the time of the Survey 1 ). The soc belonged to the abbot, and William 
Gulafra held over the freemen. 

The second estate was held of Malet by his mother, and formerly had 
been the estate of Brictmar, a freeman, who held it as a hamlet in Kenton. 
It consisted of a carucate of land, a villein, 9 bordars, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne and 3 belonging to the men (reduced to 2 at the time of the Survey), 
4 acres of meadow, and wood enough to support 100 hogs in Saxon times, 

'Dom. ii. 305. 3 Dom. ii. 4176. 

2 Dom. ii. 3766. 



128 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

but sufficient to support but 40 at the time of the Survey. This was 
included in the valuation of Kent on. 

The third was held by n freemen and a half under commendation to 
Brictmar, and consisted of 59 acres, 3 ploughteams (reduced to 2 at the 
time of the Survey), and 2 acres of meadow valued at 305. (reduced to 205. 
at the time of the Survey), the soc belonging to the abbot. 

The fourth was held of Malet by his mother, and had formerly belonged to 
Saxo, Ralph's predecessor (the little piper). It consisted of 6 acres valued 
at izd. William Malet was seised thereof, and his predecessor in King 
William's time. 

The fifth consisted of 2 acres valued at 4^., the soc belonging to the 
abbot. 

The sixth was also held of Robert Malet by William Gulafra, and con- 
sisted of 10 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 2s., the soc belonging 
to the abbot. It was formerly held by Ulviet, a freeman under commenda- 
tion to Edric. 

The seventh consisted of 2 acres valued at 4^., formerly held by half 
a freeman under commendation to one under commendation to Edric. 

The eighth consisted of two parts of the church of St. Mary with 20 
acres to protect, and the fourth part of the church of St. Andrew, and the 
fourth part of the land. 1 

The Bishop of Bayeux had a small holding here besides his manor. It 
consisted of half an acre, valued at 4^. It had formerly been the estate of 
Ailric, a freeman under commendation to Sachs in the abbot's soc.* 

The only other holding here was that of the Abbot of Ely, and consisted 
of 4 acres valued at 8d. It was formerly that of a half freeman by soc 
and commendation, and Robert Malet held him of the King, and at the time 
of the Survey of the abbot. 3 

MANOR OF CROW'S HALL alias WOODWARDS. 

This was the lordship probably of Robert Aguillers in 1221 when an 
order was made to the Sheriff as to the market in Debenham, granted by 
the King to the said Robert. 4 By 1287 the manor seems to have passed 
to one John Crow, against whom and Maria his wife a fine of the manor was 
levied by Roger de Aspale this year ; but in 1331 the manor was vested in 
Peter Talbot/ of Hintlesham, and Matilda his wife under a fine levied by 
them in that year against Walter de Wauncey, parson of Grundisburgh 
church. 6 Later Sir Edmund de Talbot, of Hintlesham, no doubt son of 
Peter, enfeoffed Robert de Roxford and others, with remainder to Sir 
Edmund de Talbot. 7 

In 1397 John Framlingham bought Crow's Hall. Leland gives the 
following account of this family : " One Henry Framelingham, communely 
caullid by Office Henry Surveyer, was a stout Felow and had faire Lande in 
and about Framelingham Toune. 

'Dom. ii. 305, 3056. 5 See Manor of Falcon's Hall, Rickinghall 

*Dom. ii. 377. Superior, in Hartismere Hundred, 

J Dom. ii. 384. and Manor of Hintlesham, in 

'Close Rolls, 5 Hen. III., pt. i, ii ; see as Samford Hundred. 

to fair Jb. 6 Hen. III. pt. i. 9. Feet of Fines, 5 Edw. III. 55. 

7 I.P.M., 3 Rich. II. 97. 



DEBENHAM. I2 g 

" And after cam one Jenkin Framelingham, and purchased a faire 
Lordship and Manor Place about Debenham Market a Mile from Some in 
Southfolk. This Manor Place stondeth on a praty Hille and a Wood aboute 
it a litle withoute Debenham Market Towne, and is caullid Crowis Haulle, 
for one Crow a Gentilman was owner of it, or ever Jenkin. Framelingham 
bought it. This Jenkin lyith yn Debenham Chirche : and sins the Frame- 
linghams hath bene Lordes of the Toune of Debenham. The Framelinghams 
of late exchaunged with the Lordes of Northfolk and Wingefield for their 
Landes in Framelingham self, and in sum other partes very nere to it. 
Ther be no mo of the Framelinghams that be Men of Landes there but the 
onely Framelingham of Debenham." 

On John Framlingham's death he was succeeded by his son and heir, 
John Framlingham, who married Margaret Lee, and died i2th June/ 1425, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, John Framlingham, who married 
Mary Walles. On his death the manor passed to his son and heir, John 
Framlingham, who married Anne, daughter of Sir Robert Wingfield, and died 
in 1498, when it went to his son and heir, Sir James Framlingham. He 
married ist the daughter and heir of John Walworth, and andly Anne, 
daughter and heir of Robert Home, by Margaret, daughter and coheir of 
John, Marquis Montague. The alliance brought a number of quarter ings 
to the Framlingham shield, for this Marquis Montague was a Nevill, 3rd 
son of Richard Nevill, Earl of Salisbury, and Alice his wife, sole daughter and 
heir of Thomas de Montacute, who had married one of the daughters and 
coheirs of Thomas Holland, Earl of Kent, the son of Thomas de Holland, 
K.G., summoned to Parliament as Baron Holland in 1353, and Joan 
Plantagenet, called the " Fair Maid of Kent," the daughter of Edmund 
Plantagenet, surnamed de Wodstocke, Earl of Kent, the son of Edward I. 
by his 2nd wife Margaret, sister of Philip the Fair, of France. 

Sir James Framlingham died in 1519, when the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Thomas Framlingham, who died without issue, whereupon 
the manor devolved on his brother and heir, Francis Framlingham, married 
to Elizabeth Anne, daughter of Sir Philip Tilney, and died 2oth September, 
1544," when it passed to his son and heir, Sir Charles Framlingham. 

We find amongst the Chancery Proceedings of this period an action by 
Sir Charles Framlingham against Nicholas Garneys and others to ascertain 
lands and recover manorial rent= " lately held by Laurence Awood, deceased, 
belonging to plaintiff late parcel of the possessions of the dissolved monastery 
of Butley," and also " lately held by John Wyeth of the manor of Crows 
Hall and land lately held by one Wyeth of the Manor of Abbot's Hall 
and Crows Hall both of which manors belonged to the plaintiff." 3 

Sir Charles Framlingham married ist Dorothy, daughter of Sir Clement 
Heigham, Knt.,and had issue one son, Clement, who died before him under 
age without issue, and an only daughter and heir Anne, married to Sir 

1 Martin, citing from West's Book of Ch. "I.P.M., 37 Hen. VIII. 92. 
Collections by Nich. Charles, Lan- 3 C.P. 1.318. 
caster Herald, 1610, p. 38, says 
" 2ist June." 



130 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Bassingbourne Gawdy, 1 of West Harling, in Norfolk, Knt. Sir Charles 
Framlingham married andly Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Thomas Barnar- 
diston, but had no issue by her. A fine was levied of the manor in 1589 by 
J. Wry chock against Sir Charles Framlingham. 1 He died the 28th July, 
1595, and devised the Manors of Crowshall, Debenham, Scotnetts, and 
Abbotshall to his youngest grandson, Sir Charles Gawdy, in special tail with 
cross remainders over. 3 

Sir Charles Framlingham was buried in Debenham church, and in the 
south aisle of the chancel is an altar tomb with his recumbent figure and 
that of his wife, Dame Dorothy. He is clad in armour girt with a sword 
having gauntlets on his hands, which are joined in the attitude of prayer, 
his head rests on his helmet. She is in the habit and large ruff of the times, 
her head is supported by a cushion. Against the wall, above the monu- 
ment, is a tablet with the following inscription : " Here lyeth the bodie of 
Sir Charles Framlingham, Knt., who dyed the 28 daye of July, An . 1595. 
The sayd Syr Charles, had two wyfes, the first named Doretye, daughter 
of Sir Clement Heigham, Knt., and by her he had issue Clement, that 
dyed without issue ; and Anne, that was married to Sir Bassingborne 
Gawdy e, Knight ; and for his second wyfe he had Elizabeth, daughter of 
Sir Thomas Barnardiston, Knight, which second wyfe overlived the sayd 
Syr Charles, and caused this monument to be erected An . 1598." 

Above the tablet is an escutcheon with the arms of Framlingham and 
his quarterings, viz. : 

(i) Framlingham. (2) Lee, of Sussex Sable, a chevron Ermine, 
between three crescents Argent. (3) Home Argent, a chevron Gules, 
between three unicorns' heads erased Azure. (4) Nevill Argent, a saltier 
Gules, a label gobony Argent and Azure. (5) Montacute Argent, three 
fusils in fess Gules. (6) Mounthermer Or an eagle displayed Vert, beak 
and legs Gules. (7) Tiptoffe (alias Tibetot) Argent, a saltier engrailed 



1 Letters of Charles Framlingham to Bas- 
singbourne Gawdy nth Oct. 1580, 
i7th Nov. [1580], and 7th and i8th 
Dec. 1580, will be found referred to 
in the loth Rep. of the Hist. MSS. 
Com. pt. Hi. 14. 

A collection of letters mostly addressed 
to the Bassingbourne Gawdy, Knt., 
of West Harling, in Norfolk, when 
he was Sheriff of Norfolk, 1578, 
1593, and 1602, were formerly in 
the possession of Oliver le Neve, 
of Witchingham, and subsequently 
of Daniel Gurney. Mr. Gurney's 
collection of Gawdy letters (in 
number 3,276) included the corre- 
spondence and papers of Sir Thomas 
Gawdy, Judge of the Common Pleas 
(1583-1605), Sir Bassingbourne 
Gawdy, Sir Henry Gawdy, Bart, 
High Sheriff 1608, and others of 
the family down to 1723. They were 
sold by auction in Dec. 1881, for 
200. See communication of Mr. 
Gery Milner Gibson-Cullum to 
East Anglian Notes and Queries 
(New Series, vol. iv. p. 190). The 
Gawdy letters are now amongst the 



Add. MSS. in the British Museum. 
This Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy was 
the son of Bassingbourne Gawdy 
who died in 1569. See Manor of 
Limbourne, Homersfield, in Wang- 
ford Hundred. 

2 Fine, Easter, 31 Eliz. 

J io Rep. Hist. Com. pt. iii. 106. Sir 
Bassingbourne's eldest son, Fram- 
lingham, was the father of Sir 
William Gawdy, created a Baronet 
(See Manor of Mandeville, Sterns- 
field, in Plomesgate Hundred), and 
from this Framlingham descended 
Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, Bart., 
whose great-grandson and heir died 
unmarried in 1723, leaving three 
nieces his coheirs, daughters of 
his only sister Anne, who married 
Oliver le Neve, of Great Wiching- 
ham, and had issue nine children, 
whereof only three survived, viz. : 
Isabel ; Anne, who married John 
Rogers, and Henrietta, who was 
the wife of Edward le Neve, both 
of which ladies had issue living in 
I725- 



DEBENHAM. i 3I 

Gules. (8) Charleton de Powys Or, a lion rampant Gules. (9) Holland 
Azure, seme de Us, a lion rampant gardant Argent. (10) Edm. de Wode- 
stocke, Earl of Kent, England Gules, three lions passant gardant in pale 
Or within a bordure Argent. (n) Wake Or two barrs Gules, in chief 
three torteaux. (12) Estoteville Barry often Argent and Gules, surtout 
a lion rampant Sable. (13) Inglethorpe Gules, a crosse engrailed Argent. 
(14) Bradstone --Argent, sur canton Gules, a rose Or. (15) De la Pole 
Azure, a fess between 3 leopards' heads Or, an annulet for difference. 
(16) Burgh Argent, on a fesse dancettee Sable, three bezants. (17) 
Geffery (qy.) Or, a chevron Sable, between 3 goldfinches proper. (18) 
Sotham Azure (Sable qy.) three pheons Argent. 

The shield is surmounted by his crest, a cornish chough, volant Sable, 
beak and legs Gules. 

Beneath the shield : 

Ma Force et Mon Amour 
Est Au Createur. 

At the east end of the tomb is a shield, Framlingham, and his quarter- 
ings impaling Heigham, viz. : Quarterly, I and 4, Heigham ; 2 and 3 
Francys. 

At the west end of the tomb is another shield, Framlingham and his 
quarterings, impaling Barnardiston, viz. : Quarterly, i and 4, Barnar- 
diston, Azure, a fesse dancettee Ermine, between six cross crosslets Argent ; 
2 and 3, Havering, Argent, a lion rampant double queued Gules. 1 

On the death of Sir Charles Framlingham difficulties arose inconsequence 
of the heir being an infant, Anne, the last holder's daughter, married to 
Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, of Harling, Norfolk, having died in his lifetime, 
leaving his eldest son, Framlingham Gawdy, under age. The Queen 
claimed the right to possession during the minority of all the lands of Sir 
Charles Framlingham, which he held in capite under the Crown, and the 
Lord High Treasurer Burleigh, having given the benefit of it to Thomas 
Heigham, he transferred his right to Gawdy, the father of the infant, by 
the following agreement : 

J 595- " Articles of Agreement indented, concluded, and made between 
Thomas Heigham, gent., seconde sonne of Sir John Heigham, Knight, on 
the one p'tye, and Sir Nicholas Bacon, Knight, on the other p't, the 26 day 
of July, in the 3yth yeare of the Reigne of our Spverigne Lady 
Queene Elizabeth, in manner and form following, viz. : Whereas 
yt hath pleased the Right Honorable the Lord Burleigh, Lord 
High Treasurer of England, M r . of the Wards, to bestowe uppon 
the sayd Thomas Heigham, his servant, the lease of the lands 
belonginge to her Heighness by the death of S r Charles Framlingham, 
Knight, deceased. That the sayd Thomas Heigham for the con- 
siderations hereinafter expressed, hath covenanted and granted by these 
presents to and with the sayd Sir Nicholas Bacon, that after the office 
found of and for the sayd lands, that the sayd Thomas Heigh'm shall for 
and in the name of Bassingborne Gaudy, Esquire, and uppon the payment 
of the fine by the sayd Bassingborne, and at the further costs and charge 
in the la we of the sayd Bassingborne, at or before the feast of St. Andrew 
next ensewinge, sue out and obtaine the lease of the lands aforesayd, and 
deliver yt to the sayd Bassingborne or his assignes. In consideration 

'.Howard's Vist. of Suff. ii. 238. 



132 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK . 

whereof the sayd S r Nicholas Bacon shall content and paye or cause to be 
contented and payd to the sayd Thomas Heigham, on Thursdaye nezt, 
beinge the last daye of July, at the house of the sayd Sir John Heigham, 
in Barrow, in the county of Suff. two hundred pounds of good and lauful 
money of England. And shall also enter his bounde obligatorie to the sayd 
Thomas in the penall sum of one hundred pounds, for the true payment 
of Ixvi/. xiijs. iiiirf. of lawful money of England, in and uppon the last day 
of October next ensewing at the place aforesayd. In wittnesse whereof 
the p'ties above sayd have to thes presents putte our haunds and scales 
the daye and yeare first above written. 

"Tho. Heigham." 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum we find a 
Crown grant of rent from this and Scottnetts and Harborough Manors 
7th May, 1631,' to Sir Edmund Moundaforde and Framlingham Gawdy. 
Sir Charles Gawdy, the devisee of his grandfather, Sir Charles Framlingham, 
married Judith, daughter of Sir William Waldegrave, and died the I3th 
Dec. 1629,* when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Charles Gawdy, 
Knt. He married Vere, daughter and coheir of Edward Cooke, of Havering, 
in Essex, and died loth November, 1650. There is, or was, a brass plate 
in the vault of the chancel of the parish church here to his memory, having 
the following curious inscription : 

" This is the body of Charles Gawdy Knt., sonne and heire to Charles 
Gawdy of Croweshall, in the county of Suffolk, Knt., who in his lifetime was 
blessed in the ha j, pie choice of a most vertuous wife, by name 'Veare' 
Cooke, the younger of the two daughters and coheirs of Edward Cooke of 
Guidyhall, in the county of Essex, Knt. ; A lady, to say noe more, severely 
modest, and of a most pure and unblemished conjugal affection, by her 
he left a hopeful issue, five sonnes and one daughter. 

"He lived and died a zealous professor of the Reformed Religion, 
settled and established in the Raygne of Elizabeth by Act of Parliament. 
A lover of Monarchy and of an undaunted loyalty to his soverayne, Charles 
ye First ; which hee frequently manifested, by espousing his cause and 
quarrel to the uttermost hazard of his life and fortune. 

" Having sojourned heere the space of thirty-eight yeares, or thereabouts, 
the 10 of November, 1650, being the Lord's daye, about twelve at night, 
he departed, I cannot say he died ; for by a voluntary, cheerful, and devout 
resignation of himselfe into the hands of the Almighty (to the wonder and 
astonishment of the beholders) though hee prevented not the stroake yet 
assuredly hee felt not the bitterness of deathe." 

Above are these arms : Quarterly of 8. (i and 8) GAWDY. (2) FRAM- 
LINGHAM. (3) . . . Gu. a goat salient Arg. (4) . . . Erm. on a chief 
Sab. 3 crosses patte Arg. (5) . . . Sab. a bend of lozenges Arg. (6). . . 
quarterly Or. and Gu. in first quarter an eagle displayed Sab. (7) BAS- 
SINGBOURNE : Gyronny of 8 Or and Az. Surtout COKE, of Gildea Hall, 
Essex, Or a chevron cheeky Gu. and Az. between three cinquefoils of the 
third. Crest, on a chapeau Gu. : lined Ermine, two swords erect Arg. 
hilts Or. 

He was the 6th October, 1646, fined as a delinquent at Goldsmith's 
Hall, in the sum of 1,789, but the Commissioners of Composition with 
such, purchased for increase of maintenance, to the ministers of Ashfield, 

'Add Ch. 15762. 'I.P.M., I7th March, 1629-30. 



DEBENHAM. I33 

Thorp, Debenham, and Kenton to settle the rectory and tithes, valued at 
150 per annum ; for which was deducted 1,260, which reduced the 
fine to 529.' 

The manor passed to his son and heir, Charles Gawdy, who in 1657 
married ist Mary, daughter of George Fielding, Earl of Desmond/ and 
2ndly Elizabeth. He was created a baronet 2oth April, 1661, and died and 
was buried at Romford i.5th Sept. I7O7. 3 He had, however, previously 
to his death sold the manor to John Pitt. William Pitt, Earl of Chatham, 
sold the manor to James Bridges, of Great Bealings. Subsequently the 
manor was purchased by Sir John Major, Bart., who died in 1781, from 
which time the manor has descended in the same course as the Manor of 
Thornham Hall, in Great Thornham, in Hartismere Hundred, and is now 
vested in Lord Henniker. 

Court Rolls of the manor 15 and 16 Jac. I. will be found in the Record 
Office, 4 and Sheriff's acquittance for fines of the manor in 1355 will be found 
amongst the Cott. MSS. 5 

In 1549 Lionel Talmage and his wife were called upon to show by what 
title they held " Debenham Manor," 6 and " Debenham Manor," whichever 
may be meant, is included in the inquis. p.m. of Thomas Walpole, who died 
24th Feb. 1513, leaving Edward his son and heir. The manor is stated to 
be held of Francis Caltrope by fealty, and the rent of id., to the Manor 
of Weybread, and to be of the value of 6 per annum. 7 

Arms of FRAMLINGHAM : Argent, a fesse Gules, betw. three Cornish 
choughs Sable, beaks and legs Gules. Of GAWDY : Argent, a tortoise 
passant, Vert. 

MANOR OF ULVESTON HALL. 

This manor is enumerated in the Great Survey under the head LUues- 
tuna. There are as many as ten entries, and four manors are mentioned 
here. The principal manor was that held by Sachs in the Confessor's time. 
It consisted of a carucate of land, 3 villeins, 9 bordars, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne, 3 belonging to the men, i rouncy, 14 beasts, 60 hogs, and 22 
sheep, valued at 405. By the time of the Survey the details had altered ; 
the villeins had come down to i, the ploughteam in demesne to i and those 
of the men to 2, while the hogs were reduced to 22. The bordars had 
increased to 14 and the sheep to 30, but the total value was 305. only. To 
this manor belonged 8 acres in demesne which at the time of the Survey 
Robert Malet's mother held of Ranulf Peverell, who was the tenant in chief 
of the whole estate. It was a league long and 7 quarentenes broad, and 
paid in a gelt 26^. 

All the other estates here at the time of the Survey belonged to the 
Bishop of Bayeux. The first consisted of 40 acres, formerly held by Alwin 
the priest, a freeman, a sixth part of whose commendation belonged to one 
himself under commendation to Malet's predecessor and five-sixths parts 
to Sachs, predecessor of the Little Piper. To this manor belonged a villein, 
a priest, 2 bordars, 2 acres of meadow, a ploughteam in demesne, valued at 
2os., but at the time of the Survey at los. The soc was in the abbot. 

1 See State Papers 1646, Cal. of Comp. 1236. 4 Portfolio, 203, 81. 

"She was buried at Debenham, 8th Sept. 5 Cott. xxvii. 152. 

1691. 6 Memoranda Rolls, Hil. Rec. Rot. 42. 

'Will I5th April, 1699, proved loth Jan. 'I.P.M., 5 Hen. VIII. 4. 

1710-1. 



134 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

William Malet was at the time of his death seised of the fourth part of this 
land, and of the priest. 

The second estate consisted of 30 acres in the abbot's soc and com- 
mendation, held by Ahvin the priest, a freeman, with i ploughteam, valued 
at ios., but at the time of the Survey valued at 55., when the ploughteam 
seems to have disappeared. 

The third manor was held by Thure, a freeman, with 40 acres, 2 bordars, 
a ploughteam, wood sufficient for the support of 8 hogs (reduced at the time 
of the Survey to 4), valued at aos. The soc and commendation belonged 
to the abbot. 

The fourth manor was held in the Confessor's time by Lewin Child, a 
freeman in the abbot's soc and commendation. It consisted of 40 acres, 
and 2 villeins in another Hundred, also one ploughteam, i acre of meadow, 
wood sufficient for the maintenance of 12 hogs, valued at 2os. At the time 
of the Survey the value was 155. and the estate was held by Roger Bigot 
of the Bishop and by Ralph de Savigni of Roger Bigot. 

The remaining properties of the Bishop of Bayeux here were 15 acres, 
3 bordars, and i ploughteam, formerly held by Godwi, and 15 acres, i 
ploughteam (by the time of the Survey reduced to half a team), and an 
acre of meadow formerly held by a freeman Goda under commendation 
to one himself under commendation to Edric, Robert Malet's predecessor. 
The value was 22s., and the soc belonged to the abbot. At the time of the 
Survey there were 4 beasts on the demesne, 10 hogs, 30 sheep, and 12 goats. 
The Survey says, but not very lucidly : " These three tenements make one 



manor." 



Another estate of the bishop's was of 40 acres, i ploughteam, valued at 
2os., formerly held by two freemen under commendation to Sachs, Edric, 
and Alnod. At the time of the Survey there were attached to this estate 
2 cows, 12 hogs, and 20 sheep. 

The last estate of the bishop's here consisted of 30 acres, 2 bordars, 
half a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 8s. It was held by 
Roger of the bishop and by Garenger of Roger, the soc being in the abbot. 
This estate had been formerly held by two freemen, Aluric and Lewin, the 
last under commendation to one himself under commendation to Edric, 
Malet's predecessor, Aluric being under commendation to Wisgar, when 
there were 2 plough teams, and the value was ios. 

There was also here a half-freeman with 2 acres included in this 
valuation. 1 

The several estates above ultimately formed the Manor of Ulveston 
Hall, which was in 1313 the lordship of John de Ulveston, probably the same 
man defendant in an action brought by Michael Attebrok in respect of a 
tenement in Debenham in 1272.* 

In 1331 the manor was held by Thomas de Bavent, Richard de Bishale, 
John de Hoxne, Stephen de Thewyts, and Elye de Chapman as trustees, 
and vested in Sir John de Ulveston, grandson of the above-mentioned John 
de Ulveston, and in 1332 passed to his son and heir, Thomas de Ulveston, 
from whom it passed to his widow Isabella for life, and subsequently to 
John de Ulveston. There is a quit claim of Ulveston Manor in 1384 in 
the British Museum. 3 It is by Sir John de Ulveston to Sir Roger Boys and 

1 Dom. ii. * Harl. 57 D. 2. 

Pat. Rolls, i Edw. I. id. (2nd year) 



DEBENHAM. 135 

Sir John de Wyngefeld, Knt., John Pishale, Thomas More, Guy Crodedok, 
Robert Grygges, clerk, Robert de Aishfeld, and William Thurtone. 

In 1428 the manor seems to have been held by William Mickefield, 
said to have been a brother of Elizabeth, widow of this John ; but probably 
as trustee for her, for life, and was later vested in Richard de Ulveston, son 
of the said John, 1 who sold the manor in 1506 to Christopher Thwaytes, 
who held his first court in 1509, and by will in 1508 devised the same to his 
son and heir, William Thwaytes, who married Margaret, daughter of John 
de Ulveston. The manor, on William Thwaytes's death, ayth August, 
I 533/ passed to his son and heir, Christopher Thwaytes, who held his first 
court in 1538, and sold in 1548 to Henry Tooley, of Ipswich, merchant, 3 
who held his first court in 1550, and died in 1553. By his will dated iyth 
August, 1552, he left the manor to the Corporation of Ipswich for charitable 
purposes, and the bailiff for the time being of the Corporation is styled Lord 
of this manor. In the ninth Report of the Historical MSS. Commissioners 
mention is made of the power of attorney by Henry " Toli," of Ipswich, to 
William Man and William Cove to enter on Henry Toli's Manor of Ulveston 
Hall and lands therein devised by him to the use of the will of the iyth 
August, 6 Edw. VI. 4 

The town clerk receives his appointment as Steward of the Manor from 
the Michaelmas Court, and by virtue thereof holds the office during the 
pleasure of the Corporation. The fines arising from the admissions and 
other profits of the manor are received by the Rente warden of this charity 
for the time being, and are accounted for by him at the passing of his 
accounts ; the fines are at the will of the lords. 

As to the expense of holding courts, in the Rente warden's account 
for the year ending at Michaelmas, 1594, a charge of 6s. 6d. is made for 
three gallons and one quart of claret spent at Ulveston court, and in 1601 
is. 2d. is charged for one bottle of sack containing 4 quarts, more for two 
bottles of white wine, and 3 bottles of claret, containing three gallons and 
half a pint, 8s. Several other items similar to the above are charged in 
subsequent accounts, but no stated or fixed sum appears at any time to have 
been allowed. A common dinner is still (or at least was up to recent times) 
provided at the expense of the charity for the homage, and those who 
attend the general courts upon business. 

A Survey dated in 1585 of the freehold and copyhold land of the manor, 
the indenture of foundation, and the licence to hold in mortmain, with 
extracts of the wills of several donors to charities placed under the care 
of the Corporation, are entered in a large book kept by the Corporation. 

Court Rolls of this manor 16 to 20 Edw. IV., 2-24 Hen. VII., 2 Edw.VL, 
2 Mary, and i to 2 Jas. I. are referred to in the Report of the Historical 
Commissioners. 5 A question of boundary of the manor will be found in 
the Additional MSS. in the British Museum. 6 

Arms of ULVESTON : Erm. a Saltire cheeky Gu. and Or. Of THWAITES : 
Arg. a cross Sab. fretty of the field. 

MANOR OF DEBENHAM PRIORY. 

This was early vested in the priory of Butley, and remained there until 
the dissolution of that house, when it passed to the Crown under a fine levied 

1 Davy says in one place that it was this * Fine, Trin., 2 Edw. VI. 

son who sold to Christopher 4 g Rep. Hist. Com. pt. i. 247. 

Thwaytes. 5 gth Rep. pt. i. 259. 

"I.P.M., 25 Hen. VIII. 20. "Add. MSS. 19094, fol. 2126. 



136 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

by the King in 1538,' and was granted in 1542 to Francis Framlingham, 
on whose death it went to his widow Elizabeth for life, and subsequently 
vested in his son and heir, Sir Charles Framlingham.* On his death in 
J 595 it passed to his eldest grandson, Framlingham Gawdy, son of 
Bassingbourne Gawdy and Anne his wife, daughter and heir of Sir Charles 
Framlingham, and then to Framlingham Gawdy's brother, Sir Charles 
Gawdy, Knt., who died in 1629, being in 1633 vested in Sir Edmund Mowde- 
ford, Knt., and Framlingham Gawdy as guardian of Charles Gawdy, 
ultimately vesting in this Charles Gawdy, son and heir of Sir Charles, who 
was created a baronet in 1661. 

The manor subsequently descended in the same course as the Manor 
of Crows Hall, in Debenham. 

MANOR OF BLUDHALL. 

John, son of William de Claydon, held this manor in 1350, and on his 
death this year 3 it went to Elizabeth, wife of Sir Andrew Luttrell, 4 who had 
a grant of free warren here. She was the daughter of Hugh Courteney, 
Earl of Devonshire, by Margaret his wife, daughter of Humphrey de Bohun, 
Earl of Hereford, and had ist married Sir John Vere, 3rd son of John, 
Earl of Oxford. She died in 1395, when the manor passed to her son and 
heir, Sir Hugh Lutterell, lord of Dunston Castle, and a moiety of the market 
of Debenham pertaining. to the manor in fee, holding then of John, Duke of 
Norfolk, by service of 2d. at the Castle of Framlingham, and by charter 
this year granted the same to William Harleston and Elizabeth his wife, 
daughter of the said Sir Hugh Lutterell, and the heirs of their bodies, with 
remainder to his own right heirs, and they had issue William Harleston. 

William Harleston the father died in 1481, 5 and later his widow 
Elizabeth, and the moieties descended to William, the son of one Hugh 
Lutterell, kinsman and heir of the said Hugh, being son of James, son of 
John his son. The said W'illiam Lutterell the son died without issue, 
and the said James was attainted of high treason in 1461. By letters 
patent in 1483 the King granted to the said Hugh Lutterell, son of James, 
and his heirs, the moieties to be held by as many knights' fees and such 
other rents as before held. 6 Hugh Lutterell died seised of a moiety of the 
manor the same year. 7 

Shortly afterwards we find the manor vested in John Cheke, of Blondsall 
or Bludhall, son of John Cheke, who had died in 1444, apparently under a 
gift from Sir Hugh Lutterell. John Cheke the purchaser married Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Bacon, of Baconsthorpe, and died in 1490, when the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Robert Cheke, who married ist Margery, sister 
of Sir Philip Tilney, and 2ndly Margaret, daughter of R., Lord Fitz-williams. 
A fine was levied of the manor in 1513 by Sir William Waldegrave and others 
against this Robert Cheke and Margaret his wife, no doubt with the object 
of effecting a settlement of the property," and by a deed dated 2oth May, 
5 Hen. VIII. [1513], which is amongst the Harleian Charters, Sir James 

'Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. 'I.P.M., 20 Edw. IV. 100. 

'See Crow's Hall, Detenham. Pat. Rolls, 22 Edw. IV. pt. i. 26. 

M.P.M., 24 Edw. III. 80. H.P.M., 22 Edw. IV. 42. 

4 See Manor of Woodhall, Little Walding- "Fine, Trin. 5 Hen. VIII. 

field, in Babergh Hundred, and 

Moulton Manor, in Risbridge 

Hundred. 



DEBENHAM. I37 

Hubert and John Resshebrooke confirmed to Robert Cheke, " son and heir 
of John Cheke," the manor with a moiety of the market and fair of Deben- 
ham, " which the said John Cheke had of the gift of Sir Hugh Lutterell." 1 

Robert Cheke died I7th Nov. 1548,' when the manor is said to have 
passed to his son and heir, John Cheke, who married Cicely, daughter of 
John Southwell, of Barham, and on his death passed to his son and heir 
John Cheke. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings is a bill to recover deeds as lord 
of the manor by John Cheke the younger against Sir Charles Framlingham, 
as to lands held of the manor as heir-at-law of his father, John Cheke. 3 

The devolution of the manor from Robert Cheke, however, we 
apprehend to be a delusion ; for it was disposed of by Robert Cheke in 1544 
to Geoffrey Blower, 4 from whom the manor appears to have gone to Margaret 
Blower, and amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth will be found an action by Margaret Blowers against Richard 
Garneys as to this manor, 5 and another by Charles Framlingham against 
the said Margaret Blowers. 6 Margaret Blowers sold the manor in 1573 
to John Southwell, 7 or to Thomas Fastolfe. 8 It afterwards passed to 
John Pitt, and from that time passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Crow's Hall, Debenham. " Blood Hall " is now represented by some 
cottages and farm buildings not far from Kenton Hall. 

The old hall was said to have been built on the site of a battle with 
the Danes. 

Arms of CHEKE : Argent, a cock, Gules, or (Davy} Arg. 3 crescent, Gu. 

MANOR OF SACKVILLE'S. 

This was held in the early part of the reign of Hen. III. by Fulco de 
Beaufo, and in the latter part by Albrede, daughter of Ralph Fitz Bernard, 
who held here a third part. The manor vested in Andrew de Sackvill, 
and Lucas de Poynings, probably a co-heir of Fulco de Beaufo, was 
interested, as also apparently Adam de Cockfield. We find from the Abbrevia- 
tion of Pleas in 1294, that Ivo de Kenton, Peter his son, and four others 
were sued for hindering Ermentrude de Sankeville, 9 Joanna, widow of Adam 
de Cokefeld, and Roger de Aspehale from using their market in a certain 
place in the Debenham Manor. 10 It looks as if Ermentrude had brought the 
manor or a share therein to the Sackville family, though it is stated that 
" Jordan de Sackville had the whole manor, and that it passed to 
his son and heir Andrew." This is by no means clear, for Jordan died in 
1273, having married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Sir Robert de 
Aguillon, and his son and heir, Sir Andrew, did not die until 1296, according 
to some authorities, or 13^5 according to Davy, which would leave no 
room for the holding of Ermentrude, who was the wife of the latter, at 
least as early as 1294. One thing is clear, and that is that Andrew de 
Sackville, the husband of Ermentrude, according to Davy, or their son, 

1 Harl. 52 A. 9. 8 Fine, Mich. 15 Eliz. 

2 I.P.M., 4 and 5 Edw. VI. D.K.R. 10, 9 She was a daughter of Sir Roger Malyns, 

App. ii. p. 129. Knt., and maid of honour to Eleanor, 

'C.P. 1.171. Queen of Edw. I., and wife of Sir 

Fine, Mich. 36 Hen. VIII. Andrew de Sankeville. 

'C.P. ser. ii. B. xxvi. 14. IO Abbr. of Pleas, 22 Edw. I. East. n. 
6 C.P. ser. ii. B. Ixiii. 3. 
i Fine, Hil. 15 Eliz. 

S 



i 3 8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Sir Andrew, according to other authorities, died seised of the manor in 
1315.' The manor passed to Sir Andrew de Sackville, Knt., son and heir 
of Ermentrude, who married Joan Mortimer, and died in 1316. 

On the Patent Rolls this year is an order to the escheator to deliver to 
Joan his widow a quarter of the profits of the toll of the market and fairs 
of Debenham assigned in dower to her by the King. 1 Subject to this 
interest the manor passed to Sir Andrew's son and heir, another Sir Andrew 
de Sackville, who married twice, both wives of the name of Joan, the ist 
the sister and heir of John de la Beeche, and the 2nd Joan Penegeis, and 
died in 1370, devising the manor to his and son (his eldest son, Sir Andrew, 
having married Alice, daughter of Sir John Wallace, and died in his father's 
lifetime), John Sackville, and Agnes his wife, daughter of Glanville, sister 
of George Glanville, who afterwards married John Cobat, and took for a 
3rd husband John Nevil, and died in 1406. 3 She held for her life, and as 
John Sackville died without issue the manor passed to his cousin, Thomas 
Sackville. He was a son of Sir Thomas Sackeville, of Wythram, co. Bucks., 
son of Robert, son of Thomas, son of Jordan, son of Bartholomew, brother 
of William de Sackeville, the grandfather of Andrew de Sackeville, husband of 
Ermentrude. Thomas de Sackville, who succeeded to the lordship of this 
manor, was M.P. for Bucks, from 1377 to 1395, and for Sussex. He 
married ist Margaret, daughter of Sir Edward, and sister and coheir of 
Sir John Dalingrigge, of Bodyham Castle, Sussex, and 2ndly, Cecily, widow 
of John Rede. Sir Thomas's will is dated in 1432, and he died the same 
year, leaving Edward de Sackeville his son and heir ; but the manor appears 
to have been disposed of by Sir Thomas in his lifetime, for we find Robert 
Crane 4 holding his first court in 1429. From Robert Crane the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Robert Crane, who died 2Oth Oct. 1447,' when the 
manor passed to his brother and heir, John Crane, who died in 1505, when 
it went to his widow Agnes, daughter of Sir John Cal thorp, Knt., who 
remarried Charles Knyvett, 3rd son of Sir William Knyvett, of Buckenham 
Castle, who held a court in 1505, and subject to her interest to his son and 
heir, Robert Crane, who in 1531 sold the manor to William Thwaytes, 6 who 
held his first court this year, and dying in 1536 the manor passed to Edmund 
Poley, of Badley, and others, co-feoffees of the said William Thwaytes, 
deceased, who had, of course, been enfeoffed during his lifetime, and had 
held a court for the manor in 1534. The beneficial interest in the manor 
passed on William Thwaytes's death, 27th Aug. 1533,' to his son and heir, 
Christopher Thwaytes, who sold it to Henry Tooley or Toli, merchant, 
who dying in 1553 left it by will to the Corporation of Ipswich. 

Court Rolls of this manor 7, 16, 17, 33 Hen. VI., 23 Hen. VII., i Hen. 
VIII-6 Edw. IV., 1, 14 Eliz. and 1-20 Jas. I., are referred to in the Historical 
Commissioners' Reports. 8 There is amongst the Chancery Proceedings 
an action by William Lawton and Mary his wife against Alice Wayth as to 
copyholds of this manor. 9 

Arms of SACKVILLE : Quarterly, Or and Gu. a bend vair. 

HARBOROUGH HALL CUM ASPALL OR CUM DEBENHAM. 
In 1304 Walter de Langton, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, granted 
this manor in exchange to Thomas de Grantaut (?) and Agnes his wife and 

1 1.P.M., 9 Edw. II. 68. 5 1.P.M., 16 Hen. VII. 

'Close Rolls, 10 Edw. II. 31. 6 Fine, Easter, 23 Hen. VIII. 

M.P.M., 7 Hen. IV. 38. 'I.P.M., 25 Hen. VIII. 20. 

4 See Manor of Chilton, in Babergh "9 Rep. pt. i. 260. 

Hundred. 9 C.P. ser. ii. B. cxv. 49. 



DEBENHAM. 



139 



their heirs. The manor in the early part of the i4th century appears to 
have become vested in Walter de Langton, and passed on his death to his 
sister and heir Alice, married to Edmund (? John) Peverell, of Castle Ashby , co. 
Northumberland, subsequently vested in Alice's daughter and heir Margaret, 
married to William de la Pole, son of Richard, 2nd son of William de la 
Pole, of Kingston-upon-Hull. 

We find that in 1383 Sir Thomas Bourchier, Knt., Sir John Hevening- 
ham, and John Bardwell, and others had the manor as co-trustees, and there 
is a Compotus Roll of it in 1404-5 amongst the Harl. Rolls in the British 
Museum. 1 

We meet, indeed, in 1353, with a fine levied of this manor and that of 
Grimston, and by 1 Sir William de la Pole and Margaret his wife against Sir 
John de Insula, Knt., Hugh de Bray, Warin, son of Sir Warin de Bassyng- 
bourn, Knt., William de la Dale, Sir Richard de Bayons, Knt., Sir William 
de Coin, Knt., William de Playford, parson of the church of Botun, Ralph 
de Hynton, John de Ofton, and Henry de Heweny." And we find amongst 
the Cotton Charters 3 acquittances in 1355 by Thomas de Morieux, Sheriff 
of Norfolk, to Geoffrey de Hodersete, for various sums paid as fines, and 
amongst them by William de la Pole and Margery his wife in a suit with 
Sir John de Insula, Knt., and Hugh de Braye respecting the Manors of 
Grimston, Appleton's (? Aspall), Debenham, with the advowson ; also by 
the aforesaid William and Margery in a suit with David de Wolleys (?) 
John de Codyngton and John de Montram, respecting the Manors of 
Asphale, Debenham, and Grimston. The date is the Friday next after 
St. Augustin, 29 Edw. III. 

From this time to the time of John Brooke, who was living in 1702, 
the manor passed in the same way as the Manor of Aspal, in Hartismere 
Hundred. The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of George Brooke, 
in I555, 4 and is included in a fine levied by Thomas Tyrell and others against 
George Broke. 5 

John Brooke sold the manor to Thomas Radberd, who held his first 
court ist March, 1688. From Thomas Radberd the manor passed to his 
cousin and heir, John Radberd, who sold the same in 1770 to Temple 
Chevallier, from whose death in 1722 the manor passed in the same course 
of devolution as the Manor of Aspal, in Hartismere Hundred. 

The manor is the subject of a fine levied in 1538 by Robert Downes 
against Sir George Broke, and George Broke held a first court for this manor 
in 1568 and levied a fine on i4th Oct. 1568. His son, George Broke, held 
his first court in 1609. There is an action amongst the Chancery Pro- 
ceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth between George Brooke and Charles 
Framlingham touching this manor said to be parcel of Crow's Hall Manor. 6 

Arms of BROOKE : Gules, a chevron Arg. a lion rampant Sa. crowned 
Or. 



1 Harl. Rolls, G. 29, 30. 

2 Feet of Fines, 27 Edw. III. 4. 
3 Cott. xxvii. 152. 



4 1. P.M., 2 and 3 P. and M. 65. 
5 Fine, Easter, 38 Eliz. 
'C.P. ser. ii. B. xxxii. 



140 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MANOR OF GIESTING al. COSTING'S OR GOSLING'S HALL al. GOSTELENS HALL. 

This was vested in Robert Cheke, of Blondhall. He was the son of 
John Cheke and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of John Bacon, of Bacons- 
thorpe, Norfolk. He married ist Margery, sister of Sir Philip Tilney, and 
2ndly Margaret, daughter of Richard Fitz-Williams, and on m's death the 
manor passed to his son and heir, John Cheke, who married ist Cecilia, 
daughter of John Southwell, of Barham Hall, and 2ndly Margaret, daughter 
of Thomas Fastolf, of Pettaugh. To him succeeded his son and heir, John 
Cheke, who married Anne, daughter of Thomas Fastolf, and sister of 
Margaret, his father's and wife, and the manor descended to their son and 
heir, a 3rd John Cheke in succession. 

The manor subsequently passed to John Bretton, and on his death 
in 1636 to his grandson, John Bretton, of Hadleigh. It later vested in 
Laurence Bretton, rector of Hitcham, who gave it by will to Foster Goodday. 
Foster (ioodday, of Kettlebaston, married Sarah, daughter of - - Breton, 
of Hadleigh, and George Goodday, his brother, married Margaret Breton. 

In 1847 this manor belonged to Charles Chevallier, of Aspal Hall. 
Later it was sold to the Norris family, who resided at " Gostling's Hall," 
now called " Debenham Hall," for many years. 

The property is now owned by J. W. Read. 

MANOR 'OF SCOTNETTS WITH THE HAUGH. 

This was the lordship of Gilbert del Hawe about 1307 and later of 
Peter Talbot. In 1428 Davy assigns the manor to Gilbert de Haughe or 
Dilhaugh, and after him to Robert Butland with a query. 

In or about 1470 the manor became vested in John Framlingham, who 
died in 1498, from which time it has passed in the same course as the main 
Manor of Crow's Hall, in Debenham. Sir Charles Gawdy held the lordship 
in 1649, an d there is amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum 
an extract from a memorial roll of this lordship 6th Oct. 1649.' The manor 
is specifically mentioned in the fine said to have been levied in 1589 by T. 
Wrychock against Sir Charles Framlingham/ and in the inquis. p.m. of 
Sir Charles Gawdy, Knt., who died the I3th Dec. 1629.' 



'Add. Ch. 32938. 3J.P.M., iTth March, 1629-30. 

1 Fine, Easter, 31 Eliz. 




FRAMSDEN. 14! 

FR A MS DEN. 

MANOR was held here in the time of the Confessor by 
Adestan the thane, and consisted of 6 carucates and 40 
acres of land, 25 villeins, 23 bordars, 4 ploughteams in 
demesne and 20 belonging to the men, 16 acres of meadow, 
wood enough to support 80 hogs, also a mill. Of live stock 
there were 2 rouncies, 6 beasts, 20 hogs, 50 sheep, and 7 
goats. When the Survey was taken the manor was held 
by Earl Hugh, and several details were different. There were 28 villeins, 
3 ploughteams in demesne and 16 belonging to the men, and wood sufficient 
to maintain 40 hogs. Of live stock there were 3 rouncies, 13 beasts, 31 
hogs, 100 sheep, and 31 goats. In the time of the Confessor there was also 
a church with 30 acres of free land, with a ploughteam in addition at the 
Survey. The value was formerly 16, increased at the time of the Survey 
to 20, but set to farm for 25. It was a league in length and 8 quarentenes 
in breadth, and paid in a gelt rod. The soc belonged to the abbot.' 

FRAMSDEN MANOR. 

This was the estate in the time of the Confessor of Adestan the thane, 
and at the time of the Survey was held by Earl Hugh. Roger de Monte 
Alto, or Montalt, paid a fine in Ipswich in King John's time for freedom 
from toll for his villeins in Framsden, and married Cecily, 4th daughter of 
William and sister and coheir of Earl Hugh de Albini, 3rd Earl of Arundel, 
by Mabel his wife, sister and coheir of Randle III., of Chester. 

The Montalt family was of Norman extraction, and took their name 
from a hill in Flintshire, in Wales, where the family anciently resided and 
had a castle. The first upon record was one of the Barons of Hugh, Earl 
of Chester, Hugo de Mara, who was the Norman grantee of the Cheshire 
possessions of the Barons of Montalt. He appears twice in the foundation 
charter of the Abbey of St. Werburgh first under the name of Fitz-Norman, 
and in a subsequent grant recited in that charter under the name of de Mara. 
In the first of these (the grant of lands, &c., in Lostock, Coddington, and 
Lea) he is joined by his brother Ralph, most probably the same with 
Radulfus' dapifer, who signs after him, as witness to the grants of Hugh 
Lupus. This Ralph was succeeded by his son, Robert de Monte Alto, 
hereditary seneschal of the Palatine of Chester, who was the father of Roger 
de Monte Alto, who by Nicholaa his wife was the father of Roger de Monte 
Alto mentioned above. 

Roger, Lord Montalt, was one of the most powerful feudal barons of 
his day, and accompanied Prince Edward to the Holy Land. He was 
constantly engaged in the wars against the Welsh, and died in 1260. Cecilia 
his relict was in the King's hands in 1268, and he claimed the power of giving 
her in marriage, she holding in fee 60 per annum. 

John de Montalt, Roger's son and heir, succeeded, and married ist 
Elena, widow of Sir Robert de Stokport ; and 2ndly Milisent, daughter of 
William de Cantilupe, and relict of Eudo le Zouch. He died without 
issue, and was succeeded by Robert, Lord Montalt, his brother, a ward of 
Edw. I., as Earl of Chester, 44 Hen. III. As hereditary seneschal he was 
called the Black Steward of Chester. 

'Dom. ii. 2986. 



142 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

On his death in 1275' we find on the Close Rolls an order to the escheator 
to deliver to Joan, " late wife of Robert Montalto," 1 this manor extended 
at 37. 45. 8Jrf., assigned to her in dower by the King. 1 Subject to Joan's 
interest, the manor passed to Robert's son and heir, Roger de Montalt, 
summoned to Parliament as a baron 23rd June, 1295. He married Julian, 
daughter of Roger de Clifford, but dying without issue in 1297,* the barony 
expired, and the manor devolved upon his brother, Robert, Lord Montalt, 
who was summoned to Parliament 6th Feb. 1298-9, and was the i8th Lord 
of Parliament, who sealed the famous letter sent to the Pope in 1301, 
denying the Kingdom of Scotland to be of his fee, or that he had any 
jurisdiction in temporal affairs. He distinguished himself in the wars of 
Scotland. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1313 by Robert de Montalt and Emma 
his wife, a widow of Richard Fitz John, against Adam de Osgodeby. 5 

In 1327 Robert de Montalt and Emma his wife settled the reversion 
of this manor on Isabella, Queen Dowager, with remainder to John of 
Eltham, and an ultimate remainder to King Edw. III. The settlement 
was effected by fine, the lordship of this parish and Kessingland in this 
county, with divers other property, being conveyed to Henry de Cliff, clerk, 
who reconveyed to the said Robert de Montalt and Emma, and their heirs 
male ; remainder to Isabella, dowager Queen of England, for life ; then to 
John of Eltham, 2nd son of King Edw. II, Earl of Cornwall, and his heirs, 
with a remainder to King- Edw. Ill and his heirs. The King paid to the 
Lord Montalt 10,000 marks for this settlement. The licence to make the 
settlement is on the Patent Rolls. 6 

This Robert, Lord Montalt, died in 1329 without issue, being the last 
heir male of that family. And there is an order on the Close Rolls this 
year not to intermeddle with the manor by reason of the death of Robert, 
and to restore to Emma his wife. 7 The lady Emma, his widow, in 1331, 
surrendered by deed all the aforesaid estates, with all her rights in dower, 
for an annuity of 400 to the Queen dowager, 8 and by an indenture dated 
at York 6th June, 9 Edw. III. [1335], Robert de Morley, the next heir of 
Robert Montalto, granted to Queen Isabel certain lands and rents in 
exchange for the Manor of Framsden. 9 

On the Patent Rolls in 1335 is a deed of confirmation between Queen 
Isabella and Robert de Morley, kinsman and heir of Robert de Monte Alto, 
whereby Robert grants to the Queen in exchange for the Manor of Frams- 
den (except the advowson of the church and the services and customs of 
Thomas, son of John de Ketelbergh) (inter alia) the advowson of the 
church of Cassinglond and the rents and services due by the following and 
their heirs for their tenements - - by Roger de Colevill, in Carleton and 
Pethagh, Thomas de Latymers, in Cassinglond, Robert de Ronhal of the 
same town, Emma Wyolte, in Framsden, Ranulph Hakidai in Ermslond, 
and John de Wynerton in Wyneston, and all that came to him by inheritance 
on the death of Robert de Monte Alto to hold for life with remainder to 
John, Earl of Cornwall, in tail and to the King and his heirs, and the Queen 
granted him in fee except as aforesaid." 

'I.P.M., 3 Edw. I. 29. Pat. Rolls, i Edw. III. pt. ii: 26: 

*She was the daughter of Roger de Mow- 'Close Rolls, 3 Edw. III. 2. 

bray. 8 Page, Hist, of Suffolk, p. 515.- 

'Close Rolls, 3 Edw. I; 4.- 'Add. Ch. 10307. 

4 I.P.M., 25 Edw. I. 37. "Pat. Rolls, 9 Edw. III. pt. i. 3 ; 17 Edw. 
'Feet of Fines, 7 Edw. II. 23; III. pt. hi. 17. 



FRAMSDEN. 



143 



In 1340 Sir Robert de Morley with Joan his wife levied a fine of the 
manor against John de Bolyngton, parson of Whatfield church, 1 and on the 
death of Sir Robert in 1359 the manor passed to his 2nd son, Sir Robert 
de Morley. 

An extent of the manor is said to be given in the inquis. p.m. of Queen 
Isabella in 1358.' In 1368 the manor was granted by Sir Robert de Morley 
to Sir Hamon de Felton and Sir John de Harsyk, Knts., and others, 1 no doubt 
by way of settlement. In 1379 a commission is found on the Patent Rolls 
issued on the information that Sir Robert de Morley, having granted to 
Queen Isabella, the King's great-grandmother, lands for life in exchange 
for the Manor of Framsden, with remainders over, certain tenants withheld 
their services. 4 

Sir Robert de Morley died seised of the manor in 1390,' when it passed 
to his son and heir, Sir Robert, on whose death in 1416 a third part of the 
manor passed to his widow in dower and subject thereto to his son and heir, 
Sir Thomas Morley, who died in 1418. 6 Petronella, widow of Sir Robert 
Morley, died seised of the third part of the manor in 1428.* 

Sir Thomas Morley had a daughter and heir Margaret who married 
Sir Geoffrey Radcliffe, Knt. She died in 1460, and was succeeded by her 
son and heir, Henry Radcliffe, on whose death in 1468 the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Thomas Radcliffe, who died I2th February, 1487-8, when 
it went to his widow Joan in d,ower, he having settled the manor on her by 
deed dated 3ist Dec. 18 Edw. IV. [1478]. Joan the widow took as a 
2nd husband, Sir Edward Arundel, Knt., and died 3rd Sept. 1523. The 
manor, subject to Joan's interest, vested in Thomas Radcliffe's son and 
heir, Geoffery Radcliffe, then nine years old. 8 The manor was then said 
to be worth 40 a year. 

Geoffery Radcliffe died 2Oth Dec. 1504,' when the reversion in the manor 
went to his three daughters and coheirs, Elizabeth, Eleanor, and Joan. 10 

By an inquisition taken at Bungay 24th Jan. 1529, under a writ of 
mandamus after the death of the said Geoffery, the jury found that Thomas 
Radcliffe, 3ist Dec. 1478, had settled the Manor of Framsden on Geoffrey 
his son by his ist wife, and that Joan Arundel, widow of Sir - - Arundel, 
who was his 2nd wife, died 3Oth (? 3rd) September, 1523. 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of " Joan Arundell, widow, 
late wife of Thomas Radcliffe," who died 3rd Sept. 1523, leaving " Thomas 
Radcliffe, son of Thomas Radcliffe, son of Margaret, next heir," "(but ?) 
and from the State Papers we learn that in 1530 an annuity was granted to 
Thomas Arundell out of the manor " lately belonging to Elizabeth Spelman." 1 
The manor is also mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of the said Joan Arundell, 
widow, " late wife of Sir Edward Arundell and afterwards wife of Thomas 
Ratcliffe," when she is said to have left Elizabeth Lovell her next heir.' 3 
This, however, was a ridiculous finding. 

Of Geoffrey's three daughters, Elizabeth married Christopher Spelman, 
and died 5th Nov. 1529,' 4 leaving a daughter and heir Elizabeth, who subse- 
quently married Edmund Dethick, and a fine was levied of a third of the 

'Feet of Fines, 14 Edw. III. 10. "I.P.M., 3 Hen. VII. 265. 

"I.P.M., 32 Edw. III. 43. 9 I.P.M., at Stowmarket, i6th June, 1515. 

3 Add. Ch. 10314. '"I.P.M., 21 Hen. VIII. 72. 

Pat. Rolls, 3 Rich. II. pt. i. id. "I.P.M., 17 Hen. VIII. 38- 

s Extent as of Honor of Chester; I. P.M., 14 "S.P. 1530, 6751, " 

Rich. II. 383 Hen. V. 23. ' I.P.M., 25 Hen. VIII. 245. 

6I.P.M., 5 Hen. V. 23. -'I.p.M., 13 Hen. VIII. 124:21 Hen. 
'I.P.M., 9 Hen. VI. 16: VIII. 39- 



144 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

manor in 1543 by Thomas Oberall (? Averall) against the said Edmund 
Dethick (Dathyk) and others. In 1544 a claim was made on " Edward 
Dethycke " and his wife for forfeiture of the manor, 1 and in 1551 a fine was 
levied of a moiety of the manor by Thomas Sherman against the said 
Edmund Dethick (Dethoke). 1 Elizabeth and Edmund Dethick in 1561 
sold a fourth share to Thomas Spekman. 

Eleanor, the 2nd daughter and coheir of Geoffrey Radcliffe, married 
Thomas Lovel, and died 27th July, 15 18, 3 leaving Elizabeth his daughter 
and heir. Her husband died in 1524. Joan, or Jane, the 3rd daughter 
and coheir of Geoffrey Radcliffe, married 1st John Sturges, and a fine was 
levied of a third part of the manor in 1533 by Christopher Jenny, serjeant- 
at-law, against the said John Sturges and others. 4 Joan married 2ndly 
Richard Withe. In the inquis. p.m. of Jane VVythe, who died 22nd Feb. 
1556,' the marriages are put the other way about. Joan and Richard 
Withe had a daughter Jane, to whom Thomas Seckford in 1553 sold a 
moiety of the manor. 

We meet with a fine in 1554 levied of one-third of a moiety of one-third 
part of the manor by Thomas Seckford against Richard Withe and others. 6 
Lionel Talmach from time to time acquired the various interests in the 
manor ; one-third he acquired from Richard Withe in 1554." Another 
third, or rather their interests in such, he acquired from Edmund Dethick 
and Elizabeth his wife in 1564* Another third in 1565 from Francis 
Sturges, son and heir of Joan by her 1st marriage, and his wife Eleanor. 9 
And a moiety of one-third from John Southwell in 1568, 10 which Southwell 
had acquired the previous year from Edmund Dethick and others." 

This interest was really the reversion of the moiety of a third after the 
death of one James Pergitor. The deed is in the British Museum, and is 
dated 2Oth June, 2 Eliz. [1560.]" Francis Sturges had by deed dated 6th 
Sept. 2 Eliz. [1560] granted a lease of the third part of the manor to this 
John Southwell. 13 

Lionel Talmach also acquired a half of a third more from George 
Southwell in 1568, and the following year was called upon to show by what 
title he held a moiety of a third part of the manor.' 4 He seems to have 
ultimately acquired, as we have said, the whole manor, and died seised 
of the same in 1571, when it passed to his son and heir, Lionel Talmach, 
and on his death in 1575 it passed to his son and heir, Sir Lionel Talmach, 
Bart., who died in 1613, when the manor passed to his widow in dower, 
and subject thereto vested in his son and heir, Sir Lionel Talmach, 3rd Bart., 
who died 6th Sept. 1640,' 5 from which time the manor has descended in the 
same course as the Manor of Helmingham Hall, Helmingham, in Bosmere 
and Claydon Hundred. 

Court Rolls of the manor, 5, 6, 8, to 10 Rich. II. are in the Public Record 
Office." Extracts of Court Rolls in 1394, 1529, 1535, 1571, and 1616 are 

'Memo. 36 Hen. VIII. Pas. Rec. Rot. 14. 'Fine, Easter, 7 Eliz. 

'Fine, Hil. 5 Edw. VI. IO Fine, Easter, 10 Eliz. 

'I.P.M., 12 Hen. VIII. 120. "Fine, Mich. 9 Eliz. 

'Fine, Easter, 25 Hen. VIII. "Add Ch. 10336. 

'I.P.M., 4 and 5 Ph. & M. 67. 'iAdd. Ch. 10337 

'Fine, Mich. 2 Mary I. ' Memoranda, n Eliz. Pas. Rec. Rot. 71. 

'Fine, Easter, 2 Mary I. 'I.P.M., at Ipswich, 5th Nov. 1640. 

' Fine, Hil. 6 Eliz. ' Portfolio, 203, 82, 83. 



FRAMSDEN. 145 

amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum, 1 and particulars 
of free tenants and copyholders amongst the MSS. in St. John's College, 
Cambridge. 2 

In 1544 a claim was made by the Crown on Sir William Springe and 
others for forfeiture of the reversion of the manor. 3 

Arms of MONTALT : Az. a lion rampant, Arg. Of MORLEY : Arg. a 
lion rampant, Sa., double quevel. Of RATCLIFFE : Arg., a bend engrailed, 
Sa. Of WITHE : Az., three griffins passant, Or. 



-' Md; %%&?* 'Miranda, ai Eliz: Mich. Rec: Rot. 26. 

T 



t 4 6 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 




PETTAUGH. 

MANOR was held here at the time of the Survey by Henry 
de Berri, and formerly by Brictnold in demesne, consisting 
of 30 acres, 5 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne (reduced 
to i at the time of the Survey), 3 acres of meadow, a 
rouncy, 3 beasts (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 
14 hogs (reduced to 8), and 32 sheep (reduced to 20). The 
commendation belonged to Robert Malet's predecessor. 
The value of the manor was 6os. (reduced at the time of the Survey to 405.). 
Hervey de Berri had another holding in the same township formerly 
the estate of five freemen under commendation. It consisted of 18 acres, 
2 ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), and a church with 
2j acres, valued at 55. The Survey says : " This was set to farm for 
3. 155., but the men thereto belonging (?) were confused, and now it is 
valued at 455." Half the soc belonged to the Abbot of Ely, and half to 
Earl Hugh's predecessor. It was a league long and 3 quarentenes broad, 
and paid in a gelt iod. 1 

Amongst the lands of the Abbot of Ely is an estate here of 20 acres 
and an acre of meadow, with a villein and half a ploughteam, valued at 55. 
Half the soc was the abbot's and half belonged to Hugh's predecessor. 
The estate had in the Confessor's time been held by Thurkettle, a freeman 
under commendation, half to the abbot and half to Gurth. The Survey 
adds : Him also Hervey held of the King, and now of the abbot by the 
King's command, as he says." 5 

The only other holding in this place was that of Siward, a freeman in 
the time of the Confessor, and consisted of 5 acres, valued at 2s. At the 
time of the Survey this land was held of the Bishop of Bayeux by Garenger, 
the soc belonging to the abbot. 1 

MANOR OF PETTAUGH HALL. 

This was in the i5th century the lordship of Henry Lancaster, and 
passed to his brother and heir, William Lancaster, who granted it in 1490 to 
Thomas Fastolf, of Ottenhall, 3rd son and heir of Nicholas Fastolf 4 and 
Elizabeth his wife, daughter and coheir of Sir John Braham, Knt. He 
married Margaret, daughter of Thomas Dewster, and on his death the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Fastolf, who was alive in 1529. He 
married Anne, daughter of Reginald Rous, of Dennington, and on his death 
the manor passed to his son and heir, John Fastolf, who married ist Eleanor, 
daughter of James Tyrell and Anne his wife, daughter and heir of John 
Hottpfte, of Collombine Hall, and 2ndly Lettice West, of Sudbury, and 
died in 1548, when it went to his son and heir, Thomas Fastolf, who married 
ist Alice, daughter of John Bacon, of Hessett, and of Dorothy his wife, 
daughter and heir of Thomas Hildersham, and 2ndly Thomasine, daughter 
of John Claxton, of Chediston, who remarried Ralph Scrivener, of Belstead. 
Thomas Fastolf died in 1599, having settled the manor on his son, John 
Fastolf, on his marriage in 1582 with Ursula, daughter of Osbert Mundeford, 



'Dom. ii. 4406. 
'Dom. ii. 384. 

3 Dom. ii. 3776. 

4 This Nicholas was son of Nicholas and 

Margery his wife, daughter and heir 
of Sir Richard Maundevillc, which 
Nicholas was son of John Fastolfe, 
of Caistor, co. Norf., who died in 



I 393> by Joan his wife, daughter of 
Sir John Clifton, of Buckenham 
Castle, co. Norf., which John was 
son of Nicholas Fastolfe, Chief 
Justice of the Common Pleas in 
Ireland, 1325, son of John Fastolf, 
of Caistor, living in 1316. 



PETTAUGH. I47 

of Feltwell, in Norfolk. John Fastolfdied in 1616, leaving two daughters 
only, Mabel, married to Robert Smith, of Alderton, and Bridget, who was 
21 years of age in 1612, and died unmarried. Mabel died in 1617. The 
manor appears to have passed to John Fastolf's nephew, Anthony Fastolf, 
son of John's brother Thomas, of Stradbrooke, and of Margaret his wife', 
daughter of - - Sturgeon, of Great Badow, co. Essex. Anthony Fastolf, 
however, did not inherit this manor, for it was sold, and bought by him. 
His will is dated gih August, 1654, and he died 5th Aug. 1655, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir by his wife Elizabeth, Thomas Fastolf, 
who was baptised at Sibton i4th Dec. 1636. 

The following is an extract from the manuscript of Ryce on the family 
and its connections with Pettaugh : " There is in Pettaugh a very ancient 
family of Fastolfe, their seat commonly called Pettaugh Hall ; it was 
sold from the name, but in the very next generation Anthony Fastolfe, 
Gent., being left rich in monies by Thomas his brother, bought it again, 
and dying, left it to Thomas his son now under age (1655). The estate 
there and elsewhere left by Mr. Fastolfe that last died, was 300 per 
annum. His relict in this year married to Bryan Smith, of Wan tesden, Gent." 1 

The manor was in 1885 vested in Lord Tollemache, of Helmingham Hall. 

MANOR OF ABBOTT'S HALL. 

This was the estate of Brictnall in the days of the Confessor, and of 
Hervius Biturmcencier at the time of the Survey. 

In 1310 the Abbot of Leiston had lands here of the gift of Gilbert de 
Peche, and there is a confirmation of a grant here to the abbey in the time 
of Hen. III. amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum. 2 In 
1316 Robert de Montalt held under the abbot. He died in I329, 3 when the 
manor or the interest in it of Robert de Montalt seems to have continued 
in the family, passing in the same course as the Manor of Framsden, in 
this Hundred, for in 1391 we find the same in Roger Montalt. No doubt 
the chief lordship was retained by the abbey of Leiston, and this on the 
dissolution of that house vested in the Crown. In 1536 the manor was 
granted by Hen. VIII. to Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, but shortly 
afterwards passed to Francis Framlingham, who died seised of it 20th 
Sept. I544, 4 on whose death it vested in his son and heir, Sir Charles 
Framlingham, who died seised of it in 1595, when it descended like the Manor 
of Crow's Hall, in Debenham, to Framlingham Gawdy, son and heir of 
Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy, and from him it passed in 1617 to Clipsby Gawdy, 
Knt., and Thomas Wright, and then vested in Sir Charles Gawdy, brother 
and heir of Clipsby, who had licence to alienate in 1620 to Aslack Lang 
and John Pulham, probably by way of settlement, for it is mentioned in 
the inquis. p.m. of Sir Charles Gawdy, who died I3th Dec. 1629,' when it 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Charles Gawdy, who sold 8 the manor to 
Daniel Meadows, of Chattisham. He married Elizabeth, daughter and 
eventual coheir of Robert Smith, of Wickham Market, by whom he had 
eight children. 

He gave part of his lands in the parish of Pettaugh, with the lordship 
and advowson, to Daniel Meadows, his eldest son and heir, who married 
the I4th Feb. 1652, Mary, daughter of Sir Richard Broke, of Nacton, Knt., 

1 Ryce MSS. ; also Page, Hist, of Suff. p. 518. 5 1.P.M., at Bury, ijth March, 1629-30. 

"Add. Ch. 10294. 6 See Manor of Crow's Hall, Debenham, in 
'See Manor of Framsden, in this Hundred. this Hundred. 

4 I.P.M., 37 Hen. VIII. 92. 



148 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and part of them to John Meadows, another of his sons, rector of Ousden, 
in Risbridge Hundred. Daniel Meadows the father died the 7th Sept. 
1651, and Daniel Meadows the son in 1675, when the manor passed to 
Robert Meadows, the latter's son and heir, who presented to the living 
in 1711. 

In 1764 the manor was vested in Philip Bennet, of Bath, and subse- 
quently in Lionel, 3rd Earl of Dysart, from which time to the time of 
Louisa, Countess of Dysart, who succeeded to the lordship in 1826 (? 1821) 
the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Helmingham Hall, 
in Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. Louisa, Countess of Dysart, in 1765 
married John Manners, of Grantham Grange, co. Lincoln, by whom she 
had with other issue William, Lord Huntingdon, who assumed the name 
of Talmash, and married in 1790 Catherine, daughter of Francis Grey, of 
Lehena, co. Cork, and died loth March, 1833, leaving a son and heir, Lionel 
William John Tollemache, 6th Earl. Louisa, Countess of Dysart, died 
23rd Sept. 1840. 

In 1855 the manor was vested in John Tollemache, of Helmingham 
Hall and Peckforth Castle, from which time the manor has descended in 
the same course as the Manor of Helmingham Hall, and is now vested in 
Lord Tollemache. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is the grant 
of a rent charge in 1631. out of Abbot's Hall and Woodwards manors.' 

MANOR OF WOODWARDS. 

This was the lordship of Thomas de Ulveston about 1332, and passed 
to his son and heir, John de Ulveston.* 

The manor belonged to John Woodward, and subsequently became 
vested in Framlingham Gawdy, from whom it passed to his brother, Sir 
Charles Gawdy, who died in 1529. 3 



'Add. Ch. 15762. J See Crow's Hall, Debenham, in this Hun- 

'See Manor of Ulveston Hall, Debenham, dred. 

in this Hundred. 




WINSTON. I40 

WINSTON. 

MANOR was held here in the time of the Confessor by the 
Abbot of Ely in demesne. It consisted of a carucate of 
land and 40 acres, 6 villeins, 4 bordars, 2 ploughteams in 
demesne and 3 belonging to the men, 6 acres of meadow, 
and sufficient wood to support 100 hogs. Also a church 
with 8 acres, 2 rouncies, 4 beasts, 20 hogs, and 50 sheep, 
valued at 4. When the Survey was taken this manor 
was still held by the abbot, there was I ploughteam only in demesne, and 
wood sufficient only for the support of 60 hogs, the value being 4.' ios. 
Alsi, a freeman added to this manor, had 30 acres as a manor in the abbot's 
soc and commendation, also 2 bordars and a ploughteam, valued at IDS. 
It was a league long and 3 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 13^.' 

Another holding in this place was that of two freemen under commenda- 
tion to one who himself was under commendation to Edric, consisting of 
19 acres, a ploughteam (reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey), 
an acre of meadow, and 2 bordars, valued at 45. At the time of the Survey 
this estate was held by William Gulafra of Robert Malet, the soc belonging 
to the abbot. 2 Another holding in this place was that of 21 freemen, 
and consisted of a carucate of land, 2 acres of this land being in the time of 
the Confessor on the demesne of Sachs, the predecessor of Ralph, the little 
piper, in Debenham. One of them was under commendation to the Abbot 
of St. Edmunds with 13 acres, and the abbot was seised thereof until Ralph 
made forfeiture. There were also 5 ploughteams and 4! acres of meadow, 
valued at 405., increased at the time of the Survey to 455., when it was 
held by the Bishop of Bayeux. The Survey also says : "Of eight Sachs 
had commendation and the Abbot of Ely had both soc and commendation 
over the others except two, namely, Alwin and Lewin, who were under 
commendation to one himself under commendation to Edric, Malet's 
predecessor." 3 

Amongst the possessions of Earl Hugh are three small holdings one 
of 30 acres formerly held by Iric, a freeman under commendation ; a second 
of 30 acres, 4 bordars, i ploughteam, and 4 acres of meadow, valued at 
155. This estate was formerly held by Grimwulf and Edward, freemen, 
with 2 ploughteams, when the value was 205. The Survey says : " Of 
two of them the abbot had half the soc, and of the third (sic) the whole, 
and the Earl had the rest of the soc." The fourth estate was of 7 acres 
and a half, valued at i8d., formerly held by a half-freeman under 
commendation." 

MANOR OF WINSTON HALL OR WINSTON-CUM-PULHAM. 

This was the estate of St. Etheldred at the time of the Confessor and 
the Domesday Survey. 

Hervey, ist Bishop of Ely, assigned or confirmed it to the monks of 
Ely [i 109-3 1 ].' A claim by the Bishop of Ely to jurisdiction in Winston 
under charters will be found in the Close Rolls in 1339. 6 In the Dean and 
Chapter of Ely the manor remained certainly since 1316. In 1587 there 
was a grant or confirmation from the Queen. 

'Dom. ii. 3836. 4 Dom. ii. 2986. 

2 Dom. ii. 3056. 5 Harl. 43 H. 4 copies. 

3 Dom. ii. 377. 6 Close Rolls, 13 Edw. III. pt. i. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is a sale 
dated I2th Jan. 1651-2.' It is made by Richard Moyse, of Debenham, 
gent., to Dennis Gawden, citizen and clothworker, of London, of his mansion 
house of Winston Hall and the Manor of Winston-cum-Pulham. 

Deeds relating to the manor are mentioned in the I4th Report of the 
Historical MSS. Commissioners.* 

MANOR OF BOOKING HALL. 

This at the time of the Domesday Survey formed part of the estate 
of Earl Hugh. In 1316 the manor was held by William de Beauchamp, 
in 1323 by John de Thorp and Alice his wife, 3 and in 1332 William Horxley 
held conjointly with Emma his wife, the Manor of Winston, of the King 
in chief, of the Manor of Rayleigh by knight's service, and through default 
of issue Robert Tinburne was the cousin and heir of the said William. In 
1338 the manor was held by Sir Ralph de Bocking, 4 who this year had a 
grant of free warren here. 5 In 1393 we find that Richard de Bocking had 
a fee here, but shortly afterwards the manor became vested in the nuns of 
Bruisyard, who held until the dissolution of the religious houses. 

In 1538 the manor was, according to Davy, granted to Sir Nicholas 
Hare, Knt., Master of the Requests and Master of the Rolls in the time of 
Queen Mary, who died 3ist Oct. 1557.' He gave the manor by his will, 
after the death of Catherine his wife, to his 2nd son, Robert Hare, 7 who 
sold to John Shorland in 1560.' 

John Shorland died in 1584, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, John Shorland, who had licence in 1597 to alienate the same to Sir 
Robert Gardiner, Knt. 

Amongst the Star Chamber Proceedings in the time of King Hen. VIII. 
we find a suit as to Winston Manor and tithes of the parsonage of Winston 
between Margaret Wythe and William Thwaytes and others. 9 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Henry Tooley, who 
died in 1552, when Joan Deane, widow, a sister of the said Henry Tooley, 
and Thomas Rede, son of William Rede and Margaret, the wife of the said 
William, another sister of Henry, were found to be next heirs, Joan being 
aged 80 years, and Thomas aged 50 years and upwards. 10 

Amongst the fines in the reign of Hen. VIII. is one levied by the King 
against Henry Moore, abbot of the monastery of St. Mary, of Coggeshall 
or Coxhall, of Honyby Grange or Wynston Graunde Manor and rent in 
Wynston." 



1 Add. Ch. 17605. inquisition Sir Rich. Hare, and does 

* Pt. ix. 271. it not say Margaret was his daughter 

3 I.P.M., 17 Edw. II. 61. and heir ? 

4 See Bocking Hall, Helmingham, in Bos- "Fine, Easter, 2 Eliz. 

mere and Claydon Hundred. 'Star C.P. Hen. VIII. Bundle 23, 139 and 

'Chart. Rolls, 12 Edw. III. 16. 189. 

6 I.P.M., 4 Ph. and M. 31. "I.P.M., 7 Edw. VI. 59. 

'See Manor of Woodbridge Ufford, in Loes "Fine, Hil. 29 Hen. VIII, 

Hundred. But is it not in the 



WANGFORD AND WILFORD HUNDREDS. 



SAXTON, 
1576. 




SPEED, 
1610. 



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^^" '* "'" r i.' 5 'iV I Jt 

wi i/ fc olRsiBrf* \ * 
*&? ***~*&a!( \P~9t 

f^'&ijSp V AT 

,, ,,,.il<i Jlflt.'/i tyv 

-..*'w *-i /?' .\y 

^JB^QH 

?%ii<ft " 

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if he en 




Th* 



BOWEN, 1777. 




WANGFORD HUNDRED. 



(WANNEFORDA OR WAINEFORDA} 

a fertile district, especially in the broad vale of the Waveney, 
where there is an extensive tract of rich marshes. On the 
south side of the vale the land rises in bold undulations 
to a high champaign tract of strong loam comprising nearly 
all the rest of the Hundred. It is about 12 miles in length 
from east to west, and about five in breadth, and is bounded 
on the north by the River Waveney, which separates it from 

Norfolk ; on the east by Mutford Hundred ; on the south by Blything 

Hundred ; and on the west by Hoxne Hundred. 

The Hundred is separated into three divisions ; the first part of it 
is thus denominated. " The Nine Parishes " is the township of South 
Elmham ; it consists of that number of parishes, namely : Flixton, St. 
Margaret, St. Cross otherwise Sancroft or St. George, Homersfield or- St. 
Mary, St. James, St. Michael, St. Nicholas, St. Peter, and All Saints. These 
nine parishes, which are also called the Deanery of South Elmham, are 
represented in old wills as one township, and as such they have an estate 
in Aldburgh and Wortwell in Norfolk common to them all. The second 
division of this Hundred is called " The Seven Parishes." They are Bungay 
St. Mary, Bungay Priory, St. Andrew, Ilketshall St. Margaret, Ilketshall 
St. Laurence, Ilketshall St. John, Ilketshall and Mettingham. 

The third division contains Beccles, Barsham, North Cove, Worlingham, 
Shipmeadow, Ringsfield, Ellough, Weston, Willingham, Redisham, Shading- 
field, and Sotterley. 

Bungay and the four Ilketshalls are in the Duke of Norfolk's Liberty, 
but the other parts of the Hundred are geldable. It is divided into the 
Deaneries of South Elmham and Wangford, and the whole Hundred is 
in the Archdeaconry of Suffolk and Diocese of Norwich. 

The fee of this Hundred was in the Crown in the time of Edw. I., and 
was granted by that King with other estates to the value of 400 per annum 
to John de Clavering for life, in consideration of the settlement made by 
him upon the King of the Castle and Manor of Warkworth and divers 
other lordships. On the death of John de Clavering the Hundred reverted 
to the Crown, and continued part of the royal demesnes until 1822, when 
it was conveyed, 3oth of April in that year, by the Right Hon. William 
Huskisson and William Dacres Adams, two of His Majesty's Commissioners 
of Woods and Forests, to John Garden, of Redisham Hall. Its revenues 
arise from the rents of about 12 acres of land lying within its limits, together 
with certain quit rents. 



152 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



The Hundred contains 33,187 acres, in 29 parishes and 41 manors, 
as follows : 



Parishes. 


Manors. 


Parishes. 


Manors. 


Barsham . . . 


Barsham. 




Ilketshall. 




Beccles. 




Wittington's. 




Roos or Rose Hall 




Ilketshall Bardolphs. 


t^f^/*r*l**c 


al. Jerald's. 


Ilketshall . . 


, Ilketshall Seckford. 


DllAlLb . . . . 


Ashman's. 




Sherlock's. 




Pismere or Piswell 




St. Andrew's. 




\ Castle. 




Ellis's and Stratton's. 




Bungay Burgh. 




Lions. 


Bungay 


Bungay Priory. 
Bungay Soke. 
Bardolfs. 


Mettingham 


Mettingham Castle 
cum Bungay Soke. 




Wathe or Wade Hall 






Cove (North) 


or Woodhall. 
Cove al. Jerningham 


Redisham . . 


f Redisham Hall. 
I Redisham Parva. 




al. Worlingham's. 






Ellough 


Ellough. 


Ringsfield . . 


Ringsfield. 




South Elmham 








New Hall: 




IBrosyard with Ver- 




St. Cross or St. 


Shadingfield 


don's. 




George. 




Francis or Cuddons. 


Elmham 


King's Hall. 






(South) 


Rawlings. 


Shipmeadow 


Shipmeadow. 


(St. James) 


Flixton. 


Sotterley. . . . 


Sotterley. 


(St. Mary) 


Boyses. 


Weston 


Weston. 




Homersfield. 


Willingham 


Willingham. 




Limbourne or Lym- 








burn called Lym- 
born Priories. 


Worlingham 


| Worlingham. 
i Little Worlingham. 




BARSHAM. 153 

BARSHAM. 

MANOR was held here in the time of the Confessor by 
Leustan, the priest, under Gurth's commendation. It con- 
sisted of 35 acres, 2 bordars, i ploughteam, wood sufficient 
for the support of 20 hogs, 2 acres of meadow, valued at 
55. At the time of the Survey there was but one bordar, 
and the value was ios., the manor being then held by 
Robert de Vallibus of Roger Bigot. It was a league and a 
half long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 30^. There was also 
half a church with 20 acres, valued at 35. Roger Bigot also had an estate 
consisting of 80 acres of land and 3 bordars, 2 ploughteams, one acre of 
meadow, wood sufficient for the maintenance of 4 hogs, valued at 205. 
This estate had formerly been valued at ios., and been held by 12 freemen 
under Gurth's commendation except two, and of these one was under 
Haldein's commendation and the other under Aluric's. A third estate of 
Bigot's here was one of 32 acres and a half, with a ploughteam and a half 
(the half having been added since Saxon times), 4 acres of meadow, half a 
mill, one villein, and 5 bordars, having a ploughteam, valued at ios. It 
was held at the time of the Survey by R. de Vallibus of Bigot, having been 
formerly held by three freemen under the King's commendation, when it 
was valued at 55. only. 1 

The Survey specifies two other estates of Roger Bigot as held in 
" Darsham," no doubt meaning Barsham. The one was formerly the estate 
of a freeman under Wolsey's commendation, and consisted of 15 acres, 
valued at 35., and the other was formerly the estate of a freeman under 
Haldein's commendation, and consisted of 5 acres, valued at i2d. Both 
these two estates were held at the time of the Survey by the said R. de 
Vallibus under Bigot. 4 

Warin, son of Burnwin, held here of Robert Malet at the time of the 
Survey a freeman Alwin, formerly under Edric's commendation, with 10 
acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 35. 3 

William, Bishop of Thetford, held here 16 acres and 2 bordars with 
half a ploughteam, valued at 2s.; 4 and amongst the lands of the fee of the 
Bishop of Thetford was an estate of 60 acres, a ploughteam and a half 
(there having been in Saxon days 2 ploughteams), and 2 acres of meadow, 
valued at ios. This estate was in Saxon times valued at 8s., and had been 
held by 10 freemen, 8 of whom were under commendation to Aluric and 
Gurth, while the others were under the commendation of Bishop Aylmer. 5 

BARSHAM MANOR. 

Robert de Vallibus was succeeded by his son and heir William, and he 
by his son and heir Robert, and he by his son and heir Robert, who died 
without issue, when the manor passed to his brother and heir, Oliver de 
Vallibus. 6 

In the Davy MSS. the manor is stated to have been vested in 1288 in 
John de Vallibus, who was the 3rd son of Oliver, and to have been partitioned 

1 Dom. ii. 335. 6 See Manor of Vaux, Wenham Magna, in 

'Dom. ii. 336. Samford Hundred. A Henry de 

5 Dom. ii. 3276. Vallibus had a grant of free 

4 Dom. ii. 379. warren here in 1264. (Chart. 

J Dom. ii. 3806. Rolls, 48 Hen. III. i.) 

V 



154 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

amongst his daughters and coheirs, viz., PetronUla, wife of William de 
Nerford, and Matilda, wife of William, Lord Roos, of Hamelake. Other 
authorities. however, assign the lordship of this manor to Robert de Barsham 
as early as 1281. It was apparently in the family in 1325, when a fine was 
levied by Robert, son of Sir Robert de Barsham. 1 In 1376 it belonged to 
John dc Nerford, who that year died seised,* and amongst the Additional 
Charters in the British Museum will be found a release of the manor in 1476.* 
This release is dated 2Oth Aug. 16 Edw. IV., and is by John Sulyard to 
Gilbert Debenham, John Toothy 11, and others. 

The Davy MSS. assert that Sir Peter de Tye 4 was lord in 1348, and that 
on his death the manor passed to his widow, Lady Dionysia atte Ty, for life, 
that she died in 1375, when the manor went to Sir Robert atte Ty, son and 
heir of Sir Peter ; that Sir Robert made his will dated 1382, and died the 
following year, leaving a widow Elizabeth, who succeeded him, but died 
the same year, and, further, that in 1396 Robert Ashfield was lord. How- 
ever this may be, it is clear that by 1426 the manor was vested in Sir Thomas 
de Echingham or Itchingham and Margaret his wife, daughter of West, 
Lord de la Warr, and passed in 1450 to his son, Sir Thomas. 

Amongst the Early Chancery Proceedings will be found an action by 
Thomas, son of Sir Thomas Echingham, against William Parker, clerk, 
feoffee, touching Barsham Blanchardes and Kessingland Manors and the 
advowson of Barsham. 5 

Sir Thomas the 2nd was succeeded in 1460 by Richard de Echingham 
his brother, whose will is dated 1461. He seems to have married Anne 
Pigot, and does not appear to have died until 1488, when the manor passed 
to his son, John Echingham, who married Anne, daughter of Sir John 
\\ ingfield, in 1516, when it vested in his son and heir, Edward Echingham, 
Knt. 

Sir Edward Echingham married Anne Lewknor, and died in 1534, 
leaving two daughters, the elder married to Owen Hopton, Lieutenant of 
the Tower, and the younger Mary married to John Blenerhasset. Mary 
carried the manor into the Blenerhasset family, and in 1546 John Blener- 
hasset and others levied a fine of a moiety of the manor against Owen 
Hopton and others. 6 

From John Blenerhasset the manor passed to Thomas, against whom 
a fine was levied of the manor in 1575 and 1579 by Sir Christopher Heydon 
and others, 7 and against whom a fine was levied by John Cornwallis and 
others in 1597,' and another the same year by Michael Stanhope. 9 

The manor passed to the Suckling family in 1613 on a purchase made 
by Sir John Suckling, 3rd son of Robert Suckling, of Woodton, Mayor of 
Norwich. In a letter written this year to his brother, Charles Suckling, 
of Woodton, he says : " I ame nowe gone through for Barsham, and have 
had a fine recoverie acknowledged to my use before my Lord Hubbard and 
to-morrow the indentures are to be sealed. . . . It is nowe myne and 
I trust that the name of Sucklings shall inheritt and possess it when I am 
dead and rotten." 

1 Feet of Fines, 19 Edw. II. 31. 5 E.G. P. 38 Hen. VI. -5 Edw. IV. Bundle 29 

1 1. P.M.. 50 Edw. III. 46. No. 41. 

'Add. Ch. 10074. 6 Fine, Easter, 38 Hen. VIII. 

*See Manors of Crettingharn Tye's, in Loes 7 Fine, East. 17 and 21 Eliz. 

Hundred, and Kessingland Itching- * Fine, Hil. 39 Eliz. 

ham, in Mutford Hundred. 'Fine, Mich. 39-40 Eliz. 



BARSHAM. 155 

Sir John was Secretary of State, Comptroller of the Household, and 
Privy Councillor to Jas. I. and Chas. I., and M.P. for Dunwich.' Sir John 
Suckling married ist Martha, sister of Lionel Cromfield, ist Earl of Middlesex, 
and coheir of her mother Elizabeth, widow of Vincent Randall, and 2ndly 
2nd March, 1616, Jane, daughter of John Reve, of London, and widow of 
Charles Hawkins. Sir John Suckling died in 1627, and by his will in 1626 
gave an annuity of 8 to the Corporation of Norwich to be distributed in 
alms. His will was proved in London 2ist May, 1627, ar >d the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir John Suckling, the cavalier poet. 

Sir John Suckling was born at his father's house at Whitton, in 
Middlesex, and went abroad and served under Gustavus Adolphus in the 
wars in Germany, achieving distinction at the battle of Leipsic in 1631. 
On his return to England he became associated with the principal wits of 
the day, and commenced a brilliant literary career. He wrote some plays 
which were acted with applause, and in 1638 produced at his own cost 
" Aglaura," usually considered to be the first play produced with the 
accessory of scenery in this country. The first representation was favoured 
by royalty. The previous year he had produced his " Session of the Poets." 
The poet lived in a most extravagant style, and was much given to gambling. 
The decline of his popularity in the brilliant circle in which he moved is 
attributed to a quarrel with a brother of Sir Kenelm Digby, in which the 
poet received a severe beating, which he does not appear to have resented 
in the mode expected of him. In 1639 his " Brennoult " appeared under 
the title of " The Discontented Colonel," a satire on the rebels. When the 
disturbance broke out in Scotland Suckling equipped a troop of 100 horse in 
the King's service, and so magnificently that they cost him, it is said, 
12,000. The uniform was white doublets with scarlet coats and breeches. 
To raise the money necessary for this extravagance he sold the Manor of 
Barsham to his uncle, Charles Suckling, of Woodton. The misconduct 
and defeat of his men in 1639 in the battle between the Scotch and the 
Royalists gave occasion for a ballad more coarse than humorous, said to 
have been written by Sir John Mennis." In 1640, on the meeting of the 
Long Parliament, Suckling was returned member for Bramber, and took 
an active part in the strife that followed. In 1641 he joined in a plot to 
rescue Strafford from the Tower, and was in consequence summoned before 
Parliament and accused of being an accomplice in a design to bring over the 
French. Upon this he fled to France, and died soon afterwards in that 
country some day about 7th May, 1641. The cause of his death is uncertain. 
Some assign a fever, others according to a story related by Pope and 
inscribed on his portrait at Knowle, in Kent, by a wound in the heel from 
a rusty nail, a penknife, or a razor, placed purposely in his boot by his valet, 
who, after robbing him, wanted to ensure safety in flight by disabling his 
master from pursuit. According to Aubret, however, the poet poisoned 
himself. 

Sir John Suckling's works are : (i) " Fragmenta Aurea," with a por- 
trait, Lond. 1646 ; (2) " The Goblins " ; (3) " Fragmenta Aurea," 1648, 
without a portrait ; (4) " An account of Religion by Reason," Lond. 
1658 ; (5) " Aglaura," ' The Goblins," and " Brennoult," Lond. 1658. 
(6) Letters to Several Persons of Honour," Lond. 1659 ; (7) " The Sad 
One " : a tragedy, Lond. 1659 ; ( 8 ) " His Last Remains," Lond. 1659. 

'Muskett's Manorial Families, vol. ii. p. "See Percy's " Ancient Ballads" ii. 322. 
180. 



156 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

(9) His Works, Poems, Plays, Letters, Lond. 1709, with portrait. This 
last has been several times reprinted. Selections from, his works, with a 
life prefixed by the Rev. Alfred Suckling, appeared London, 1836. 

Charles Suckling, the purchaser of the manor from his nephew, Sir 
John, in 1640, was the son of Robert Suckling, Mayor of Norwich 1572-82, 
M.P. for the same place 1570-85, by Joan, his 3rd wife, daughter of William 
Cardinal, of Bromley, in Essex. He married twice- ist Mary, daughter 
and coheir of Stephen Drury, of Aylsham, in Norfolk, and 2ndly Dorothy, 
daughter of Sir Anthony Drury, of Beesthorpe, widow of John Burman, 
D.C.L. Charles Suckling died in the month of December, 1644, and his 
nuncupative will was proved at Norwich loth Jan. 1645-6. He was succeeded 
by his son and heir, Robert Suckling, High Sheriff for Norfolk, in 1664. 
He married twice 1st Anne, 3rd daughter of Sir Thomas Woodhouse, of 
Kimberley, and 2ndly Margaret, daughter of Sir William Doyley, Bart., 
of Shottisham, and devised this manor to his eldest son, Robert Suckling, 
by his will dated 2oth June, 1681. Robert Suckling the son married i6th 
Nov. 1669, Sarah, daughter of Maurice Shelton, of Shelton, and made his 
will dated zgth Sept. 1707, which was proved at Norwich i8th April, 1709, 
and on his death the manor passed to his eldest son, Robert Suckling. He 
married in 1701 Dorothy, daughter of John Berney, of Swardeston, co. 
Norfolk, and on his death in March, 1734, was succeeded by his widow 
Dorothy, and on her death in Jan. 1747,' their son, Dengill Suckling, 
succeeded to the lordship. Dengill married in 1739 Hannah, daughter and 
coheir of Richard Tubby, niece to Archbishop Tennison, and died in 1744. 

On DenguTs death (his will was dated loth Oct. 1744) the manor 
passed to his widow Hannah, and on her death to his only son and heir, 
Robert Suckling, who died in 1802, a lunatic, without issue, when the manor 
passed to his cousin and heir, Robert George Suckling, son of Robert Suckling, 
by Susanna Webb, his wife, a descendant of Inigo Jones, which Robert 
was the son of Richard Suckling, by Anne Kyberd his wife, which Richard 
was brother of the said Dengel Suckling. Robert George Suckling was 
killed at Guadeloupe in 1814, and dying without issue the manor passed to 
his brother, Maurice William Suckling, who served under Nelson in the 
Agamemnon, and married ist Catharine Framlingham and 2ndly Caroline 
Ramill. Maurice Suckling died without issue ist Dec. 1820, when the 
manor passed to his nephew, the Rev. Alfred Inigo Fox, son of his sister, 
Anna Maria, by her husband Alexander Fox. Alfred Inigo Fox assumed 
the name of Suckling by royal licence in 1821, and married 3ist Jan. 1816, 
Lucy Clementina, daughter of Samuel Clarke, of Berghapton. In 1839 
the manor was offered for sale with other property under the description 
of " The Manor of Barsham Hall in Barsham and Shipmeadow extending 
over 2,000 acres of land. Also the advowson of the Rectory of Shipmeadow. 
The Barsham Hall and Barsham House estates contain about 600 acres.'" 
Alfred Inigo Suckling died in May, 1856, when the manor passed to his 
grandson and heir (subject to the life interest of the grandson's mother), 
the Rev. Robert Alfred John Suckling, son of the Rev. Alfred Inigo Suckling, 
by his wife Anna Maria, daughter of John Yellowby, M.D., of Cavendish 
Hall, which Alfred Inigo Suckling had died in 1851 in his father's lifetime. 
On the death of his mother in 1880 the manor vested in possession in the 
said Robert Alfred John Suckling, of Barsham and of St. Alban the Martyr, 
Holborn. 

'Her will was proved 23rd Jan. 1747. 'Ipswich Journal, 6th July, 1839. 



BARSHAM. 157 

A Manor of " Barsham " belonged to the Garneys. William Garneys, 
who married Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Sir Ralph Bigot, by his will, 
dated I3th Feb. 1420, gives to Elizabeth his wife certain hereditaments, 
and to Ralph his son after his wife's death the Manors of Redisham and 
Barsham. The will was proved 6th April, 1425,' and the manor is in 1435 
included in an appointment made by Ralph Garneys of William Bonde and 
Robert Ludlowe to deliver seisin to Sir Thomas Kerdestone, John Hevenyng- 
ham, Knt., William Pastone, John Berney, of Redham, sen., and eight others. 
The appointment refers also to the Manors of Redisham and Westone, and 
is dated loth Jan. 14 Hen. VI.' This was made pursuant to a demise (?) 
made from Sir William Philip, Sir John Fastolf, Knts., Oliver Groos, 
John Bacun, Robert Rous, Robert Reve, clerks, and William Cole, to Ralph, 
son of William Garneys, of the manor, in tail, to him and his right heirs, 
with remainder to Peter Garneys, uncle of the grantee and his right heirs, 
failing which to the right heirs of the above William Garneys. This deed 
is dated 3Oth Nov. 14 Hen. VI. [1435], and is accompanied by a power of 
attorney from the said Sir William Philip, John Fastolf, and others to John 
Vernoun and John Honyngham, clerks, to give seisin in accordance with 
the grant. 3 This same manor called " Barsham " is the subject of a 
Chancery suit by Ralph, son and heir of William Garneys and of Elizabeth 
his wife, against Piers or Peter Garneys, uncle of the said Ralph. 4 

A " Barsham " Manor is included in a fine levied in 1516 by Sir Richard 
Wentworth and others against Lionel Talmage and Edith his wife, 5 and a 
Manor of " Barshaumps " in a fine levied the following year by Sir Edmund 
Jenney and others against John Garneys and Elizabeth his wife. 6 

Arms of VALLIBUS : Cheque, Or and Gu. on a chevron, Az. three 
roses Or. Of SUCKLING : Per pale Gules and Azure three bucks trippant 
Or. 



'Reg. Horning, Norw. pt. ii. fol. 136. 4 E.C.P. Bundle 71, 82. 

Harl. 50 F. 37. 'Fine, Mich. 8 Hen. VIII. 

'Cotton v. 3, 22. 'Fine, Easter, 9 Hen. VIII. 




158 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BECCLES. 

|N Edward the Confessor's time the Abbot of Bury held 2 
camcates of land here as a manor. There were 2 villeins, 
26 bordars, 2 serfs, i ploughteam in demesne and to the 
men, 10 acres of meadow, wood sufficient for the support 
of 8 hogs, and a market of which the abbot had three parts 
and the King the remaining part, and there were 26 
burgesses and 2 rouncies. In the township were 30 socmen 
rendering all kinds of custom, and they held a carucate and a half of land, 
having under them 20 bordars, and possessing 7 ploughteams which were 
in Norman times increased to 8. But in King Edward's time they could 
not sell their lands, which implies that later they were able to do so. There 
was also a church with 24 acres. 

This manor in Saxon times rendered 30,000 herrings, but by the time 
of the Norman Survey 60,000. 

It was a league in length and 8 quarentenes in breadth, and in a gelt 
paid i6d. The Domesday tenant in chief was the Abbot of Bury.' 

We find under the Half-Hundred of Lothingland particulars of lands 
in Beccles belonging to the King and, in the hands of Roger Bigot for him. 
They are 82 acres, 5 villeins, and i ploughteam, the market of which the 
King had the fourth part, and of all customs, and 12 freemen with 48 acres 
and a ploughteam. 1 

BECCLES MANOR. 

The manor was, about the year 956, given to the abbey of Bury by 
King Edwin, eldest son of King Edmund, and it was enjoyed by the abbey 
until the Dissolution, when it was granted by Hen. VIII. in parcels to William 
Rede in 1539-42, 3 whose son, William Rede, married Anne, daughter of 
William Ferney, afterwards the wife of Sir Thomas Gresham, founder of 
the Royal Exchange. 

Thomas Gresham and his wife were in 1544 charged to do fealty to 
the King for this manor. 4 And amongst the Chancery Proceedings of 
the time of Elizabeth is the record of an action brought by Sir Thomas 
Gresham and Lady Anne his wife, described as late wife of William 
Rede, against Thomas Colbye respecting the manor and the leet and view 
of frankpledge, defendant having a manor in Beccles called Rose Hall, 
which was held of Beccles Manor, and encroached upon plaintiff's rights, 
and the defendant claimed to hold his manor independently of the plaintiffs. 5 
She died 1598, but does not seem to have retained the manor till her death, 
for there is amongst the Exchequer Depositions the particulars of an action 
by her son and heir, William Rede and others against the Corporation of 
Beccles, 1588, respecting the lordship. The proceedings were as to the 
amendments by the plaintiffs of former patents of Beccles Common to New 
Corporation.' The manor is now vested in the Corporation of Beccles. 

In 1849 we meet with an advertisement of a sale at the Mart, London, 
2ist Aug. of " The Manor of Beccles, the fines of which are arbitrary."' 
An extent of the Manor of Beccles in 1587 will be found amongst the Davy 
MSS. in the British Museum. 8 
'Dom. 11.369. 5 C.P. 1.330. 

*Dom. 11. 2836. 'Beccles, Exch. Dep. 1588. 

O. 2 Pars. Rot. 35,302; 1540 S.P.436(83) J Ipswich Journal, 28th July, 1849. 

1542 S.P 137 (11). " Wangford, vol. 11. fol. 24. 

4 Memoranda Rolls, 36 Hen. VIII. Mich. 

Rec. Rot. 5. 



BECCLES. 
Roos OR ROSE HALL al. JERALD'S MANOR. 



159 



Rose Hall Manor belonged to the family of de Roos in the time of 
Hen. III. It passed to the Garneys, of Redisham. 

Robert Garneys, of Bcccles. had the manor, and married Katherine 
Broke. He died in 1411, when the manor passed to his son, Peter Garneys, 1 
who married Anne, daughter and one of the heirs of Ralph Ramsey, and 
in 1430 Peter Garneys and his wife Anne were parties to a fine levied that 
year in respect of the manor.* He died in 1451, leaving by his will dated 
3rd Sept. 1451, 3 this manor to his 2nd son, Edmund Garneys. He 
married 1st Matilda, daughter of Thomas Ellis, Mayor of Norwich, 
and andly Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Jermy, of Metfield, who 
remarried Henry Repps, of Heveningham, and died 3rd May, 1485, 
when the manor passed to his son, Thomas Garneys, who married Anne, 
daughter of Thomas Brampton, of Brampton, in Norfolk, and relict 
of John Wychingham, and on his death in 1527 passed ,to his son and heir, 
Thomas Garneys, who married ist Alice, daughter of Sir William Rous, of 




ROSE HALL. 



Dennington, and 2ndly Ursula daughter of Edward Read, alderman of 
Norwich, who remarried 2ndly Thomas Browne, of Beccles, 3rdly Sir John 
Brend, of Beccles, and 4thly Thomas Colby, of Brundish. Thomas Garneys 
died without issue, and by his will dated 3oth July, 1540,* left the manor 
to his widow Ursula. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1548 by William Payne against 
Michael Garneys. 5 Ursula Colby died in 1567, and in 1569 a fine was 
levied of the manor by Thomas Colby against Edward Crofte and others. 6 

In an inquis. p.m. in 1566 the manor is said to be held of Thomas 
Playters as of the Manor of Sotterley, but in 1575 it was declared by a jury 
to be held of the Manor of Beccles. At that time Thomas Colby was lord, 
but in 1600 it was purchased by Sir John Suckling, 7 youngest son of Robert 



1 See Manor of Kenton, in Loes Hundred. 
'Feet of Fines, 8 Hen. VI. n. 

3 Proved at Norwich 5th Feb. 1451. 

4 Proved at Norwich 1541. 



5 Fine, Mich. 2 Edw. VI. 

Fine, Hil. 4 Eliz. 

T See Manor of Barsham, in this Hundred. 



160 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Suckling, Mayor of Norwich, by Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Adam Bar- 
wick, of East Bergholt. 

There is a clause in his will dated 3Oth Sept. 1626,' which throws 
light on the descent of this manor : " Whereas I have mortgaged my 
Mannerr of Rosehall in Suffolk to certain Feoffees to the vse of my verie 
lovinge wief, for the payment of six thousand poundes within one yeare 
after my decease : Nowe for that I knowe that my executors cannott 
possiblie paie the same within the time menconed, I am content to leave 
that Manor wholie to the said Feoffees for her behalf, And would have my 
Executors give her the Writings concerning the same, unless she shalbe 
pleased, out of her noble and good nature to give my eldest sonne such time 
for the payment as he maie be able to compasse the same without harzard- 
ing the mine of his estate. I give to my wief all her Apparell, Pearles, 
Ringes and Jewelles, save onlie one chaine of dymonds which I lately 
bought of one Mr. Hardnett, a Jeweller for 155, which is by her to be repaid 
to my executors, vnless my eldest sonne and she agree about the Redemp- 
tion of the Mannor of Rosehall." Sir John died in 1627. 

Now Jane, Sir John Suckling's widow, whom he married when himself 
a widower, 2nd March, 1616, was the daughter of John Reve, of Bury, and 
widow of Charles Hawkins. She was the sister of Mary Reve, who had 
married three times ist John Bushbridge, of Echingham, Sussex ; 2ndly 
Robert Bankworth, son of John Temple, by Susan Spencer, of Everton. 
No doubt the mortgagee of Sir John Suckling was this Sir Alexander Temple, 
and though it is not clear whether the 6,000 had been actually raised and 
paid to, or for the benefit of, Jane, or whether she had only a charge to this 
amount by way of settlement, one must almost imply the former, and that 
Jane when a widow, and at least for two months after her marriage to Sir 
Edwin Rich, which was on the I4th Sept. 1629, declined or failed to redeem. 
This may be inferred from the will of Sir Alexander Temple, of Stow, co. 
Bucks, dated 2ist Nov. 1629, wherein is the following gift : ' I ordaine 
my loving cousin, Graven Saunders and Robert Airbery merchant and 
Henry W alley agent my sole executors. First. I give the manor of 
Rosehall and Ashmans in the County of Suffolk unto them to sell at 
their pleasure and also all my land in Essex, and all the lands I have in 
this kingdom, first to pay all such debts as my son James Temple stands 
engaged for me and then to discharge themselves. The rest to remain 
to my son James and his heirs for ever.'" 

Jane died 22nd Nov. 1662, and was buried beside her ist husband, 
Charles Hawkins, in a vault at the upper end of the south side of St. Nicholas 
Aeons, London. Sir Edwin Rich was buried at Mulbarton i6th Nov. 1675, 
and by will 3 granted 20 " to be paid out of my lands situate in the county 
of Suffolk called Rose Hall Farme now in the tenure and occupation of John 
Woolnough. These and all my other land in Suffolk I had by marriage 
with the Lady Suckling my loving and beloved wife." He left his estates 
to his brother, Sir Charles Rich, created a bajonet in 1675. He died two 
years later, in May, 1677, leaving two daughters. His 2nd daughter and 
coheir Mary succeeded to Rose Hall, and married her cousin, Sir Robert, 
2nd Bart., son of Col. Nathaniel Rich, of Stondon, in Essex, by Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Edm. Hampden. Sir Robert Rich died ist Oct. 1699 

'Proved 2ist May, 1627. 'Proved London, 16751 

1 P.C.C. 103 Ridley. 



BECCLES. 161 

and was buried under a monument in Beccles churchyard. He was 
succeeded by his eldest son, Sir Charles Rich, 3rd Bart. 

Amongst the Exchequer Depositions may be seen particulars of an 
action brought by this Sir Richard Rich against John Draper in 1736 
respecting " Manor called Rosehall and Ashmans cum Membris in Beccles. 
Metes and bounds Survey. Quit rent. Custom, &C." 1 

Sir Charles Rich died unmarried, and was succeeded by his eldest son, 
Sir Robert, 4th Bart. He died in 1768, and was succeeded by his eldest 
son, Sir Robert, 5th Bart., who married Mary, only daughter of Richard 
Ludlow, of Ardsallgate, co. Meath, Ireland. He left an only daughter, 
Mary Frances, who in 1784 married the Rev. Charles Bostock, LL.D., of 
Waverley Abbey, Farnham, co. Surrey. 

Sir Robert Rich died in 1785, when in default of issue male the baronetcy 
expired, but the manor devolved upon his daughter, whose husband assumed 
by royal licence 23rd Dec. 1790, the name of Rich, and was created a baronet 
2ist June, 1791. He, in 1805, sold the manor to Thomas Rede, of Beccles, 
from whom it passed to his son, Robert Rede, who died in 1822 without 
issue, when the manor passed under his will (subject to the life estate of 
his widow) to his nephew, the Rev. Robt. Rich (Rede ?) Cooper, a younger 
son of the Rev. Samuel Lovich Cooper, of Yarmouth, by Sarah, 2nd daughter 
of Thomas Rede, and nephew of Sir Astley Paston Cooper, the eminent 
surgeon, and he assumed the name of Rede. 

Roos or Rose Hall, the old manor house, is now the property and 
residence of Frederick William Darby Robinson, J.P. The mansion has 
been recently restored. 

ASHMAN'S MANOR. 

This manor was vested in Sir John Suckling, who died in 1627, leaving 
a widow Jane, who married Sir Edwin Rich, from which time the manor 
appears to have devolved in the same course as the Manor of Roos Hall, 
in Beccles. .1 

A plan of Rosehall and Ashman's manors in 1769 will be found amongst 
the Additional MSS. in the British Museum.* 

Court Rolls of the Manor of Beccles 19 Hen. VII. 32 and 33 
Hen. VIII. are in the Public Record Office. 3 

PlSMERE OR PlSWELL CASTLE MANOR. 

Little is known of this manor save that in 1657 it belonged to Robert 
Yallup, and later passed to Robert Sparrow, 4 of Worlingham, who died in 
1822, and from him to his daughter Mary, married to Archibald, 2nd Earl 
of Gosford. 



'Beccles, Exch. Dep. 1736. 4 See Manor of Worlingham, in this Hun- 

1 Add. MSS. 34557 ; Suff. Inst. iv. 94. dred. 

'Portfolio 203, 3; 



W 




i62 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BUNGAY. 

(HE two parishes of Holy Trinity and St. Mary do not comprise 
more than 1,992 acres, and yet in the time preceding the 
Norman Conquest there were no less than nine manors in 
them. The largest portion of land was that in the time of 
Edward the Confessor held by Stigand, and which at the 
time of the Norman Survey was in the keeping of William 
de Noers for the King. It extended to 9 carucates. There 
were in this manor always 20 villeins and 16 bordars, in Saxon times 
6 serfs but later only 3. In Saxon times there were 3 ploughteams in 
demesne, but later only 2. The men had 12 ploughteams and a half, and 
there were 29 acres of meadow, wood for 100 hogs, 2 rouncies and 4 
beasts, 3 hogs, 9 sheep, and 60 goats. 

These, with a church and 5 acres, were in Saxon times valued at loos., 
but in Domesday times it rendered 12. Five other manors were in the 
King's hands, and in the keeping of this William de Noers. One was held 
by a freeman under Ulmar under Stigand's protection, and consisted of i 
carucate of land. There were 3 villeins and 6 bordars, and in demesne I 
ploughteam and i belonging to the men. Besides there was wood for 20 
hogs, 2 acres of meadow, 4 rouncies, 3 beasts, 6 hogs, 20 sheep, and 16 
goats. Under him a freeman held an acre, and the whole was valued at 2os. 
A third manor was hejd by a freeman Alwin, also under the protection 
of Stigand, with a carucate of land. There were 6 villeins, 8 bordars, I 
ploughteam in) demesne and 2 belonging to the men, wood for 10 hogs, 4 
acres of meadow, 4 rouncies, 15 hogs, and 13 sheep, and the value was also 
2os., and six freemen held 14 acres and a ploughteam valued formerly at 45. 
The Survey goes on to say : " And after King William came into this 
country two brothers shared this land, one of them Wolsey is in hand under 
the King and Ulric is in hand under Earl Hugh, and this Wolsey has 60 
acres and 2 villeins and 4 bordars." Also 10 acres and a ploughteam were 
held here by four freemen and a half, there being a ploughteam in demesne 
and i belonging to the men, 2 acres of meadow, wood sufficient for the 
maintenance of 6 hogs, valued at i8s. Sd., but rendering at the time of the 
Survey 145. 4^.' 

A fourth manor was small, consisting of 30 acres and 2 acres of meadow. 
It was held by Goodrich, a freeman, with i bordar and i ploughteam, and 
the value was formerly 8s. but had increased to ios., and it rendered 85. 
worth of farm produce. 

A fifth manor was held with 60 acres in King Edward's time by Pat, a 
freeman, but in Domesday time by Houart and Ulsino. There were 8 
villeins, formerly 8 bordars and 4 serfs, but in Norman times the number 
of bordars and serfs were reduced by half. There were 2 ploughteams in 
demesne and 2 belonging to the men, wood for 12 hogs, 2 acres of meadow, 
and 4 rouncies. Formerly there had been 6 beasts, 12 hogs, and 30 sheep, 
but these had increased, the 6 beasts to 8, and the 30 sheep to 100. The 
manor had been formerly valued at 205., but in Domesday time was valued 
at 305., and it rendered in farm produce to the value of i6s. There was 
also a church connected with this manor with 12 acres valued at 2s., but 
thef e were two half-freemen and one whole freeman with 16 acres valued 
at 35., i ploughteam belonging to the manor. 

'Dom. ii. 288. 



BUNGAY. 163 

The sixth manor was merely one of 30 acres of land and 2 acres of 
meadow. It had been held in the Confessor's time by Alfgar, a freeman, 
but by Norman times it was held by Edric. There were 2 villeins, 2 bordars, 
2 serfs, I ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the men, wood for 16 
hogs. It was valued at 8s., and rendered as much in the value of farm 
produce. 

In the same keeping for the King were 80 acres, 3 bordars, 4 plough- 
teams, 3 acres of meadow, rendering 205., which had formerly belonged to 
two freeman under Stigand's commendation, and were then valued at 135. 
Also a church with 30 acres valued at 35. The Survey says of the township : 
" It is 2 leagues long and i league and 8 quarentenes broad and paying 55. 
in a gelt." 1 

The other three manors in Bungay were held by Earl Hugh as tenant 
in chief. The main manor was that held by Aluric, a freeman, in the Con- 
fessor's days, with 6 carucates of land. There were in it 22 villeins, 22 
bordars, 3 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 6 belonging to the men, 
later reduced to 2, and at the time of the Domesday Survey standing at 3. 
With this manor was a church with 20 acres and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 
4od. In this manor there was wood for 30 hogs, 14 acres of meadow, a 
mill, and three-fourth part of another, 3 beasts, formerly 22 hogs but later 
only 12, formerly 32 sheep but later 100. This manor was formerly valued 
at 6os., but the value had increased to loos. 

Earl Hugh held a second manor of 40 acres which Ulchetel had in the 
Confessor's time. It was at the time of the Domesday Survey held by 
William, and there were 4 bordars, i ploughteam in demesne and i 
belonged to the men, i acre of meadow, and i mill, 2 rouncies, 2 beasts, 20 
sheep. Then there were 5 hogs and 80 sheep, and the value was 135. 4^. 
The last manor to be mentioned was that held in the Confessor's time by 
Somerlet, a freeman. It was but small, consisting of 40 acres of land and 
2 acres and a half of meadow. To it belonged i villein, 3 bordars, i serf 
in demesne, i ploughteam, and I belonging to the men, wood for 6 hogs, 
and the fourth part of a mill. The value, like the last-mentioned manor, 
was 135. 4^. 

Earl Hugh also held here a carucate of land, 10 acres, a bordar, 2 
ploughteams (reduced from 3 in Saxon times), 4 acres of meadow, and wood 
sufficient for the maintenance of 3 hogs, of the value of 405., the estate having 
been held in the time of the Confessor by 27 freemen under Aluric's com- 
mendation. 

Sixty acres held by Earl Hugh belonged to one of the manors in the 
King's hands. To this particular 60 acres there belonged a freeman and 
a half with 5 acres and a half, and the value was 2s.* 

MANOR OF BUNGAY BURGH. 

The lordship of Bungay belonged to the Bigots, Earls of Norfolk. To 
the Domesday tenant in chief, Roger Bigot, succeeded his son and heir, 
William Bigot, in 1106, and on his death in 1120 this manor passed to his 
brother and heir, Hugh Bigot. One of these Bigots erected the strong 
Castle of Bungay, now in ruins. This castle was so strongly fortified by 
Hugh Bigot, and the natural position was so advantageous, that it was 

'Dom. ii. 288. 'Dora. ii. 300, 301. 



164 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



deemed well-nigh impregnable.' Through the Bigots, the King, Thomas de 
Brotherton, and the Mowbrays, the manor passed in the same course as the 
Manor of Framlingham, in Loes Hundred, and was confirmed to the Duke 
of Norfolk with that manor by Act of Parliament in 1489.* 

This manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Roger, 4th 
Earl Bigot, in 1270,' being then stated to be held of the Earl of Warwick, 
by the service of a knight's fee, and Roger, 5th Earl, in 1294, obtained 
permission to embattle his house here, which had been erected on the site 
of the demolished castle. 4 It is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. 
of the 5th Earl, who died in 1305,* and in that of Edward de Montague, 
who died in 1361,' and in that of William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, who died 
in 1381-2.' 

In 1384 Margaret, Countess of Norfolk, had a grant of a market in 
the manor to herself and the heirs of her body. 8 We find the manor also 




I 



BUNGAV CASTLE. 

included in the inquis. p.m. of John de Mowbray, Duke of Norfolk, who died 
in 1432 ;' of John Mowbray, 3rd Duke of Norfolk, and Eleanor his wife ; 10 
of John Mowbray, 4th Duke of Norfolk, who died in 1475." 

An extent of the manor in 1453 to 1454 will be found amongst the 
Additional MSS. of the British Museum.' 2 

The manors now known as Bungay Burgh, Bungay Priory, and Bungay 
Soke were all, at least until recently, vested in the Duke of Norfolk. Extracts 
from the Court Rolls of Bungay Manor in 1613 will be found amongst the 
Additional Charters in the British Museum,' 1 and an extent of the manor 
in 1453-4 amongst the Additional MSS. in the same depository. 14 



1 Plans of ruins of the Castle by Kerrich 
(Add. 6735), by Essex (Add. 6768), 
Excavations S.I. vii. 212. 

"Rolls of Parliament, vi. 411, 503, 529. 

'I.P.M., 54 Hen. III. 25 or File 38 (17). 

4 Pat. Rolls. 22 Edw. I. 20. 

M.P.M., Roger le Bygod and Alicia his 
wife, 35 Edw. I. 46. 

I.P.M., 35 Edw. III. 17. 



7 I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 57. 

Chart. Rolls, 7 and 8 Rich. II. 17. 

I.P.M. ( ii Hen. IV. 43.; I.P.M., i Hen.- 

IV. 7ia. 72. 

'"I.P.M., i Edw. IV. 46. 
" I.P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 58. 
"Add. 33988. 
"Add. Ch. 10580. 
"Add. MSS. 33988. 



BUNGAY. 165 

The manor known as Bardolf is in the parish of Trinity Bungay and 
Ilketshall St. Lawrence. It was in 1328 with the Manor of Clopton obtained 
by Elizabeth de Burgh, the relict of Roger de Amorie, for herself for life, 
with remainder to John, Lord Bardolf and Elizabeth his wife (who was her 
daughter by the said Roger) in exchange for other manors. 

Sir William Windham Bailing, Bart., of Earsham Hall, in Norfolk, 
was in 1847 the owner of this manor. 

MANOR OF BUNGAY PRIORY. 

The convent of St. Cross, founded by Roger de Glanville and Gundreda, 
Countess of Norfolk, his wife had attached to it about 1160, a manor known 
as the Priory Manor. This manor at the Dissolution came to the Crown, 
and was granted by Hen. VIII. to Thomas Howard, Duke of Norfolk, in 
tail. 1 

In 1537 Catherine Wroth, widow, and Samuel and Francis Wrothe 
had a lease of this manor for their lives, and in 1602 Thomas Gellott and 
others had a grant from the Crown. In 1610, however, it appears to have 
been vested ha Robert, Earl of Salisbury, for in that year he had licence 
to alienate the manor. 

Amongst the State Papers in 1606 is an offer by Samuel Wrott and 
his brother, who held the manor of which Salisbury had the reversion, to 
relinquish to him on condition of his giving the younger Wrott a place 
worth 120 per annum. 2 

A particular of the priory in 1607 will be found amongst the Tanner 
MSS. in the Bodleian, 3 and an account of the visitation there in 1636 in 
the same collection.* 



'State Papers, 1537, vol. ii. 1311 (24); 'Tanner, xcvii. 34. 

Originalia, 29 Hen. VIII. Rot. 96. 4 Ib. Ixviii. 98; 

'State Papers, 1606, 289. 



166 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

COVE (NORTH). 
MANOR OF WATHE OR WADE HALL OR WOODHALL. 

This manor was probably called after Robert Watheby, of Cumberland, 
who held it in the time of Hen. II. From Robert de Watheby the manor 
passed to Ms son and heir Thorpine, whose daughter and coheir Maud 
married Sir Hugh or Hubert Fitz-Jernegan, of Horham Jernegan, Knt., 
and carried this manor into that family. He died in 1203, and the manor 
vested in his son and heir, Sir Hubert Jernegan. The King, however, 
granted the lordship of all his large possessions, and the marriage of his 
wife and children to Robert de Veteri Pont or Vipont, so that he married 
them without disparagement to their fortunes. From the death of bir 
Hubert Jernegan about 1239 tne manor is said to have passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Horham Jernegan's, in Hoxne Hundred, to the death 
of Sir John Jernegan in 1474, and is included in a fine levied in 1303 by John 
Polone against Roger, son of Peter, son of Osbert and Katherine his wife. 1 

Davy, however, states that on the death of Sir Hugh Jernegan in 1272 
the manor went to Roger fitz Peter fitz Osbert, apparently assuming the 
manor to have come to the Jernegans like the Somerleyton estate through 
the marriage of Sir Walter Jernegan with Isabella, sister and coheir of Sir 
Roger Fitz Osbert, whose widow he (Davy) makes lady of this manor in 
1302. He also gives three descents of the Noyons which could only be on 
a like assumption, Sir John Noyon having married Alice (? Catherine), the 
other sister and coheir of Sir Roger Fitz Osbert. He, however, makes 
this manor to return to the Jernegans in the person of Sir Peter Jernegan, 
son and heir of the Sir Walter Jernegan above mentioned. 

Sir John Noioun, who married the coheir of Sir Roger Fitz Osbert, died in 
1324, his son John died in 1340, and the last John's son John died in 
1348, leaving a son Sir John, who died in 1361 without issue, probably 
at about 16 years of age. We find some evidence in favour of Davy's 
statement, evidence of such a nature that we are compelled to admit 
its force. It is an authority on the Inquis. Quod Damnum 
Rolls in 1302 for Roger, son of Peter, son of Osbert, to settle this 
Manor of Wathe on himself, Katherine his wife, and the heirs of their 
bodies, with remainder to his own right heirs/ and there is the further 
licence for Roger to retain the Manor of Ilketshall on resettling the Manors 
of Wathe and Somerleyton.' There is, too, on the Close Rolls in 1349 
an order to deliver this manor to the nearest friend of the heir to whom it 
cannot descend by hereditary right, as the King learned that John Noioun 
at his death held no lands in chief in Suffolk, whereby the custody ought to 
pertain to the King, but that he held the said manor in this demesne as 
of fee in chief in free socage by the service of paying 45. yearly to Norwich 
Castle to the white form, and that John his son was his next heir and aged 
4 years and upwards. 4 

In any case, we are on sure ground in the person of Sir Peter Jernegan, 
for he most likely succeeded his father Sir Walter directly as to a moiety, 
and ultimately had the entirety of the manor on the failure of issue of the 
Sir John Noyon who married the coheir of Sir Roger Fitz Osbert in 1361. 

Sir John Jernegan, by his will, which is dated 1473, devised the 
Worlingham Manor, as also this Manor of Wathe Hall, in North Cove, to 

1 Feet of Fines, 31 Edw. I. 20. 3 I.Q.D., 31 Edw. I. File 44, 20. 

1 1.Q.D., 30 Edw. I. File 39, 18. "Close Rolls, 23 Edw. III. pt. ii. 5; 



COVE (NORTH). 167 

his son Osbert for life, devising to his eldest son John the manors 
and advowsons of Somerleyton, Stonham-Jernegan, Horham-Jernegan, 
and Bradwell, and the foundation or advowson of the religious house of 
St. Olave. Upon Osbert's death the Manor of Wathe Hall seems to have 
gone to Sir Edward Jernegan his nephew, the eldest son of Osbert's eldest 
brother, Sir John, and on his death the 6th Jan. 1515, to have passed to his 
2nd wife and widow Mary, daughter and coheir of Richard, 2nd son of 
Lord Scroop, of Bolton, who remarried Sir William Kingstone, Knt. of 
the Garter. 

The manor on Mary's death passed to Sir John Jernegan, Sir Edward's 
eldest son, and he joined with his son, George Jernegan, in selling the manor 
in 1538 to William Rede, citizen and mercer, of London.' The conveyance 
is dated the 2gth Nov. and is made subject to the life estate of Mary 
Kynston, late wife of Edward Jernegan, father of Sir John, and then wife 
of Sir William Kingston, Knt., Controller of the King's Household. William 
Rede died in 1542, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir William 
Rede, Knt., who levied a fine of the manor in 1560 against W. Robardys 
and others. 2 

In 1657 we find the manor held by Robert Yallop, of Gray's Inn, and 
somewhat later in the early part of the i8th century it passed to Robert 
Bence, of Henstead, who died in 1745, when it passed to his daughter and 
coheir Anne, married to Robert Sparrow. The subsequent devolution is 
identical with the Manor of Worlingham, in this Hundred, and in 1885 was 
vested in the Rev. Sir Charles Clarke, Bart., who died in 1889. 

There is a Court Roll of this manor in 1616 amongst the Additional 
Charters of the British Museum. 3 Wade Hall, now a farm house, stands 
near the moated site of the ancient Hall, where numerous Roman bricks, 
an antique key, and other antiquities have been found. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1344 by Richard de Burstede, parson 
of Framlingham church, William Scarlet, parson of Gunton church, John 
Gerard, chaplain, and John Fraunceys, of Hadenfeld, against John Bokel, 
of Freston, and Margaret his wife, and Richard Bokel and Joan his wife. 4 
The manor was then held by Margaret, wife of Theobald de Leyston, for life- 

MANOR OF COVE'S al. JERNINGHAMS al. WORLINGHAMS. 

Of this manor little is known. All Davy in his MS. collections says 
of it is that Hugh de Bery was lord in 9 Edw. II., and that in the time of 
Elizabeth it was vested in John Aldham, who dying 16 Eliz. it passed to 
his son and heir, Thomas Aldham, and on his death 24 Eliz. it passed 
to his son and heir, John Aldham. 



' Fine, Hil. 31 Hen. VIII. 3 Add. Ch. 10431. 

"Fine, Mich. 2 Eliz. Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. III. 29. 




168 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ELLOUGH. 

manor is mentioned in the Survey as in this place, but we 
find two holdings here both of Roger Bigot. The first was 
formerly that of two freemen under Burchard's commen- 
dation, and consisted of 7 acres and half a ploughteam, 
valued at 36^. 

Earl Ralph was seised of this when he made forfeiture, 
but Roger Bigot held it of the King's gift, R. de Vallibus 
holding it of him. 

The second holding consisted of a villein with 10 acres, belonging to 
Mutford.' 

ELLOUGH MANOR. 

Probably up to the time of Edw. I. or even later this manor was a Royal 
demesne. It subsequently passed to the Wachesham family. 

Martin states that Sir Robert de Wachesham, who was lord in 1345, 
left an only daughter Elizabeth, married to Sir Thomas Gerbridge or Cor- 
bridge, in whom the manor vested. They left an only daughter Alice, 
married to Sir Edmund Barry or Berry, Knt., who died in 1433, leaving two 
daughters his heirs Agnes, married to Sir William Paston, of Paston (after- 
wards Judge Paston), and .Alice, married to Sir Thomas Bardolph, and then 
to Aslack, who by her had issue one daughter, married to Playters, of 
Sotterley, to whom in right of his wife the manor fell. 

This last is not quite correct, for Alice survived Sir Thomas Bardolph, 
and married John Southwell. Davy more correctly says that there was 
issue of Sir Thomas Bardolph and Alice his wife a daughter and heir named 
Elizabeth, and she married William Aslack, of Canrow. Suckling states 
that in 33 Hen. VI. William Bond conveyed to John Southwell and Alice 
his wife, relict of Sir Thomas Bardolf, and heiress of Berry, the Manors of 
Ellough and Pakefield. He adds that in 1477 the manor was with Thomas 
Aslack, from whose descendants it passed by a female heir to Thomas 
Playters of Sotterley. This agrees with the fine we meet with in 1470 
which was levied of " Elgh Manor al. Wyllyngham All Saints," by Roger 
Touneshend and Henry Spelman against Thomas Aslack and Elizabeth his 
wife.' 

William Aslack died I7th June, 1531, 3 having had a daughter Dorothy, 
married to Christopher Playters, of Sotterley, who died in 1547, when the 
manor vested in their son, Thomas Playters, who died seised of it in 1572, 
when it passed to his son and heir, William Playters, from which time to 
the time of Sir Lionel Playters, 3rd Bart., the manor went in the same course 
as the Manor of Uggeshall, in Blything Hundred. 

Sir Lionel Playters settled this manor on Lionel, his 2nd son, afterwards 
Sir Lionel Playters, 5th Bart., who died in 1699, when it passed to his son 
and heir, Sir John Playters, 6th Bart., who before 1768 sold the manor to 
Robert Sparrow, 4 of Worlingham, who died in 1765, when it passed to his 
son and heir, Robert Sparrow, and on his death in 1822 went to his daughter 
Mary, married to Archibald Acheson, 2nd Earl of Gosford. 

' Dom. ii. 3356. * See Manor of Worlingham, in this Hun- 

Feet of Fines, 10 Edw. IV. 24. dred. 

'I.P.M., 23 Hen. VIII. 61. 



ELLOUGH. 169 

In 1855 the manor was vested in H. S. Farr, in 1885 in the Rev. Sir 
Charles Clarke, Bart., of Beccles, in 1900 in Frederick William Holham of 
Battle, in Sussex, and is now vested in the Hon. Alfred John Mulholland, 
of Worlingham Hall. 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Robert Bumpstead in 
1480,' and in that of William Playters, of Sotterley, who died 6th June, 
1584 taken aoth Oct. following, leaving Thomas Playters, his son and heir 
then aged 18. 



1 1.P.M., 19 Edw. IV. 42. 



i 7 o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ELM HAM (SOUTH). 




GOOD many manors were held in this place in Saxon times. 
When the Survey was taken the first two were held of the 
fee of the Bishop of Thetford. 

The first was formerly held by commendation and soc 
under Bishop Aylmer, and consisted of 40 acres, 4 bordars, 
a ploughteam, 2 acres of meadow, and sufficient wood to 
support 8 hogs ; also a church with 6 acres. Under him 
3 freemen under the said Bishop Aylmer's commendation held 6 acres and 
half a ploughteam. The manor was formerly valued at ios., but at the 
time of the Survey rendered 12s. 1 

The second manor was formerly held by Alwin,a freeman, by commen- 
dation and soc under Aylmer. It consisted of 40 acres, 2 bordars, a plough- 
team (reduced to half at the time of the Survey), and 2 acres of meadow, 
the value formerly being 6s., increased when the Survey was taken to ios. 8d. 

Here was also a holding formerly of 10 freemen by commendation 
and soc under Aylmer, consisting of 66 acres, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of 
meadow, valued at ios., but rendering 145. at the time of the Survey. 
And another holding formerly of 10 freemen by commendation and soc 
under Aylmer. This consisted of 34 acres and 3 ploughteams (reduced to 
2 at the time of the Survey). The value was ios., rendering double when 
the Survey was taken. It was a league long and half a league broad, and 
paid in a gelt 20^.* 

Three other manors here belonged to the fee of the Bishop of Thetford 
at the time of the Survey. The first was formerly held by Bond, a freeman, 
by commendation under Bishop Aylmer, and consisted of 60 acres, 2 villeins, 
2 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the men (reduced 
to half a team at the time of the Survey). Also 2 acres of meadow. Under 
him were two freemen with 7 acres and a ploughteam, reduced to half a 
team at the time of the Survey. The value was formerly ios., but when 
the Survey was taken 13$. 

The second manor was formerly that of a freeman by commendation 
and soc and sac under Stigand, and consisted of 30 acres, 2 villeins, a plough- 
team and i belonging to the men, also 2 acres of meadow, and wood sufficient 
for the support of 8 hogs, the value formerly being 8s., but at the time of 
the Survey ios. 8d. 

The third manor was formerly that of Alwin, a freeman by commen- 
dation under Edric of Laxfield, consisting of 30 acres, 2 bordars (increased 
to 3 at the time of the Survey), and half a ploughteam. Also an acre of 
meadow and wood for the maintenance of 8 hogs. Under him was a holding 
of 2 freemen consisting of 4 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at ios. 
William Malet was seised of this on the day of his death. 

There were two other estates enumerated here in the Survey. One 
was then held of the Bishop of Thetford by William, and formerly by Alwin, 
a freeman by commendation under Inwar the thane. It consisted of 2 
carucates of land, 20 acres, 10 villeins, II bordars, 4 serfs, 3 ploughteams 
in demesne, a rouncy, 7 beasts, 30 hogs, 13 sheep, and 30 goats, also 6 
ploughteams, n acres of meadow, wood to support 30 hogs, a church with 
40 acres of free land, and half a ploughteam. When the Survey was taken 

'Dom. ii. 379. 'Dora. ii. 380. 



ELMHAM (SOUTH). 171 

there were only 4 villeins, but there were 20 bordars, the serfs were not 
mentioned, and there was half a ploughteam in demesne, while belonging 
to the men were 3^ teams. The value was s., increased to 4 at the time 
of the Survey.' 

The other estate in this place was formerly that of 25 freemen under 
commendation to Bishop Aylmer, and consisted of if carucates of land, 8 
ploughteams (reduced to 6 at the time of the Survey), 6 acres of meadow, 
and wood for the maintenance of 16 hogs. The value was 305., increased 
to 405. at the time of the Survey. There were also 3 churches with 30 acres 
valued at 55.* 

The last manor mentioned was held in Saxon times by Goodrich, a 
freeman under Ralph the Staller, and consisted of 40 acres, 2 villeins, a 
bordar, a serf, a ploughteam in demesne and half belonging to the men, 
and wood for the maintenance of 4 hogs. Also 2 acres of meadow, the fifth 
part of a mill, a church with 8 acres and the fifth part of a church with 6 
acres, valued at I2d. The value was then 75., but it rendered 2os. at the 
time of the Survey. Under Goodrich were two freemen having 5 acres 
and half a ploughteam included in the said valuation. The Domesday 
tenant was Goodrich the Steward. 3 

At the time of the Survey Earl Alan had an estate here of 40 acres 
belonging to the church of Rumburgh. Also 6 bordars, a ploughteam, 
and sufficient wood to support 6 hogs. They are included in the valuation 
of the said (? church). 4 

The last holding mentioned in this place was that of Robert Malet at 
the time of the Survey, and consisted of 15 acres valued at 30^.' 

MANOR OF SOUTH ELMHAM. 

The manor extended over nine parishes and formed a sub-division of 
the Hundred of Wangford, anciently called the liberty, manor, or town- 
ship of South Elmham. It was granted by Sigebert, King of the East 
Angles, to Felix the Burgundian, his first bishop, who fixed his see at Dun- 
wich in 680. 6 

This was the estate of Robert Malet at the time of the Survey, and 
William de Nevery held later, and sold in noi to Hubert de Losinga, 
Bishop of Norwich, who gave it to the See of Norwich. During the holding 
of the manor by the See of Norwich we meet with various orders relating 
thereto on the Patent Rolls. In 1383 is a confirmation of letters patent 
granting to Robert Cayley al. Caily for life the office of steward of the 
Bishop's manors in Norfolk and Suffolk and power to distrain in respect of 
his salary of 20 marks in the Manor of South Elmham. 7 Also the appoint- 
ment of John Norbury as custodian of his park of South Elmham, 8 and the 
same year confirmation of letters patent granting to Geoffrey Alkyn for 
life the office of master and surveyor of the Bishop's lands. 9 

The Bishop of Norwich had a palace here from a very early period, 
and so in all probability had the Bishop of Dunwich before him. It is 
certain that a palace was built in South Elmham by Bishop Hubert, and 

1 Dom. ii. 380. 6 Cott. Aug. ii. 103 ; Cott. ii. 21 (n) ; H. R. 
2 Dom. ii. 380. ii. 191 ; Q. W. 733 

3 Dom. ii. 356. > Pat. Rolls, 7 Rich. II. pt. ii. 23. 

4 Dom. ii. 298. *Ibi 19. 

5 Dom. ii. 3276. 9 Ib. 5. 



172 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Page suggests that the old moated ruin in St. Margaret's parish may be 
the remains. The existing mansion now called St. Margaret's Hall was 
erected by some later bishop. 

Roger de Skerning, Bishop of Norwich, died at his Manor of South 
Elmham, on St. Vincent's Day, 22nd Jan. 1278, and was buried at Norwich. 
The manor remained with the Barony of the Bishop of Norwich till the reign 
of Hen. VIII., when it was seized into the hands of that sovereign in exchange 
for other lands, the seizure and exchange being authorised by Act of Parlia- 
ment in 1535. 

By an indenture made between Hen. VIII. and Edward North, 
Treasurer of the Court of Augmentations, and dated 4th Dec. 1540, the King 
granted amongst other lands, in exchange for Huddenham, Codyngton in 
the county of Bucks., " All that his maner of Southclmeham with all and 
singulcr his membres, ryghtcs, and appurtenaunces in the countie of Suffolk, 
and the advowsons, giftes, and p'ron'age, and p'ryshe churches of Sayntt 
James, Seynte Peter, Sayntt Margarette, Sayncte Nycholas, and All Sayntts 
of Southelmeham, in the said countie of Suffolk, and the advowson, gifte, 
and p'ronage of the p'ishe churche of Humersfield, in the s d countie of 
Suffolk, which manor and advowsons were lately parte and p'cell of the 
rightes and possessions of the Busshopricke of Norwiche. To hold all the 
lands, &c., thus granted, of the King, by the service of ^ D of a knight's fee, 
and the payment of 8. 2s. fyd. for the manor of Southelmham, &c., into 
the Court of Augmentations, at the feast of St. Michael, annually, for ever.'" 

In the State Papers for 1541 we find " augmentation 1,100 parcel of 
3,600 due for the purchase of South Elmham Manor lately granted to 
Edward North.'" 

From Sir Edward North, summoned to Parliament in 1553 as Lord 
North, the manor passed in 1565 to his son and heir Roger, 2nd Lord North, 
who died seised in 1601 of the Manor of South Elmham, with all lands and 
advowsons pertaining to it in St. James's, St. Peter's, St. Margaret's, St. 
Nicholas's, Homersfield, &c., held of the Queen by knight's service, valued 
at 70. 75. lod. per ann." The manor passed to his grandson Dudley, 
3rd Lord North, subject to the life interest of his mother Dorothy, 
Lady North, wife of Sir John North, who had died in 1597 in his father's 
lifetime. This Dorothy was a daughter and coheir of Sir Valentine Dale, 
Knt. 

By a conveyance dated 2oth May, 1613, Dudley, Lord North, sold the 
Manor of South Elmham, with the rectories, advowsons, right of patronage 
of the several rectories of St. Margaret, St. Peter, All Saints, St. Nicholas, 
St. James, St. George, and Homersfield, with the site of the mansion, 
manor, and all the demesnes for 2,500 to Sir John Tasburgh, Knt. From 
this time to the death of John Tasburgh in 1719 the manor passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Flixton, in this Hundred. 

On John Tasburgh's death in 1719 the manor passed to his daughter 
and heir Lettice, married to John Wyborne, and they about 1753 sold the 
manor to William Adair. On his death in 1787 the manor passed to 
Alexander Adair, from which time it has devolved in the same course to the 
present time as the Manor of Cratfield Le Roos, in Blything Hundred. 

'S.P. 1541, 503 (50) ; Cotton MSS. Nero. C. 'S.P. 1541, 745 f. 53. 
ix. ; Suckling, Hist, of Suff . vol. i. 184. 



ELMHAM (SOUTH). 173 

Compotus of the manor 1398-99 will be found amongst the Harleian 
Rolls in the British Museum. 1 

MANOR OF NEW HALL. 

In the time of Hen. IV. this was the lordship of Robert Bateman, of 
Flixton, who married Alice Darsham, and died in 1437. 2 The manor 
passed to his son and heir, Thomas Bateman. The Bateman family had 
long been connected with Flixton. William Bateman, consecrated Bishop 
of Norwich in 1343, resided much at his palace of St. Margaret, South Elm- 
ham, and purchased considerable property in the neighbourhood. 

Sir Bartholomew Bateman his brother lived in the village of Flixton, 
and was " buryed in thys abbey of Flixton." Sir Bartholomew Bateman, 
the bishop's father, also resided and was buried there. Thomas, son and 
heir of Robert Bateman, succeeded his father in this lordship, and by his 
will dated 8th April, 1485, gave the same to his eldest son, Robert Bateman, 
on whose death it passed to his son and heir, Thomas Bateman, who married 
Catherine, daughter of Thomas Billingford, of Blackford Hall, in Stoke 
co. Norfolk, and died 4th June, I555 3 when the manor vested in his son 
and heir, George Bateman, who married Olive, daughter of John Tasburgh, 
of St. Peter, South Elmham, and died in 1581,* when it passed to his son 
and heir, Thomas Bateman. Thomas Bateman married Elizabeth, daughter 
and heir of Thomas Forster, and in 1583 sold the same to Owen Tasburgh, 5 
and it subsequently passed to John Tasburgh, who died seised of it in 1608, 
and was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir John Tasburgh, who died in 
1629, from which time the manor has no doubt devolved in the same course 
as the main Manor of South Elmham. 

Arms of BATEMAN : Sa. 3 crescents Erm. in a bordure engrailed Arg. 

MANOR OF SAINT CROSS OR ST. GEORGE, SOUTH ELMHAM. 

This appears in the Domesday Survey under the head Crosscroft, and 
the estate was that of Burchard, a freeman, in King Edward's time. The 
holding consisted of ij carucates of land, 3 villeins, 5 bordars, 2 plough- 
teams (which had disappeared at the time of the Survey, though 2 could be 
made up). Also 2 ploughteams belonging to the men. There was formerly 
a rouncy, 5 beasts (which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), 3 
acres of meadow, and wood for the support of 10 hogs, the value being 
26s. 5^. The Domesday Survey adds after this entry : " Sotterley is a 
league long and 9 quarentenes broad. And in a gelt pays 3^. This Mundred 
holds of Hugh." No.t a very lucid statement, particularly in connection 
with Sancroft. 6 

This manor formed part of the possessions of the See of Norwich until 
the reign of Hen. VIII. at least, the overlordship, for the manor as early 
as the time of Edw. II. was vested in the Sancroft family. Thus we meet 
with a fine of part of this manor and of the Manor of Flixton in 1312 levied 
by Robert de Sandcroft and Joan his wife against John, parson of Sandcroft 
church, and John de Redenhale. 7 

Amongst the Campbell MSS. in the British Museum is a settlement 
of this manor made by will in 1437." 

'Harl. Rolls 2, 29. 'Fine, Mich. 30-31 Eliz. 

a Will zgth May, 1437, proved ist July, 1437. 6 Dom. ii. 3016. 

3 I.P.M., 3ist Oct. 1555. 7 Feet of Fines, 5 Edw. II. 29. 

4 See Manor of Saint Cross, in South Elm- 'Campb. xii. 14^. 
ham. 



174 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



In the early part of the isth century the manor was acquired by the 
Bateman family, but they probably held under the Bishop of Norwich, as 
it formed part of the property obtained by Lord North soon after the 
Dissolution. 

Thomas Bateman held this manor with Newhall, and by his will dated 
8th April, 1485, desired that Robert, his eldest son and heir, should have 
his manors called Newhall and Sandcroft and all his lands and the advowson 
of the church of St. George de Sandcroft, to be held by the said Robert and 
his heirs male, and in default of issue remainder to William Bateman, his 
son and his heirs, with remainder to Richard, his son and his heirs, &c. 

From Robert Bateman the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas 
Bateman, who died 4th June, 1555, when we find from his inquis. p.m., 
taken at Bungay 3ist Oct. 1555, that he died seised of the Manors of Sand- 
croft and Newhall, in South Elmham, with two messuages and lands valued 
at 20, held of Edward North. The manor was sold by Thomas Bateman, 
jun., the grandson of the last-mentioned Thomas, to Owen Tasburgh in 
1588,' and subsequently passed to Sir John Tasburgh, who 24th April, 
1629, died seised of the Manors of South Elmham, Boyses, Sandcroft, 
Newhall, Flixton, &c. The manor has no doubt subsequently passed with 
the main Manor of South Elmham. It is now vested in Sir Frederick 
E. S. Adair, Bart., of Flixton Hall. 

MANOR OF KING'S HALL. 

In 1558 this manor belonged to Alice Wentworth, and a little later 
to Thomasine Berdwell, widow of James Berdwell. She died seised of it 
in 1599, when it passed to her son and heir, James Berdwell, who sold it. 



1 Fine, Mich. 30-31 Eliz. 



ELMHAM, SOUTH (ST. JAMES). 175 

SOUTH ELMHAM (ST. JAMES). 
MANOR OF RAWLINGS. 

We learn little of this manor, save from an inquisition in the time of 
Hen. VII., which shows that it was held of the Bishop of Norwich. The 
Inquisition is that on the death of Sir John Sulyard, who died i8th March, 
1487. It was found that a moiety of this manor worth 10 marks held of 
the Bishop of Norwich was in trustees to the use of Sir John in fee, and that 
Edward Sulyard was his son and heir and then aged 28.' 

A fine was levied of this manor in 1579 ^Y William Grudgefield against 
John Thurstone. 3 

In 1631 the manor was vested in John Berney, for ist April, 7 Car. I., 
he held his first court. Thomas Gotts held his first court 25th April, 1633, 
Stephen Blomefield his I4th Oct. 1652, and Walter Plummer 3ist August, 
1726. 

The manor in 1807 was in William Plummer, for at a court held by 
him 8th Dec. this year, Alexander Adair, of Pall Mall, London, and of 
Flixton, Suffolk, and Edward Brice, late of Westminster, and afterwards 
of Berners Street, executors and trustees of the will of William Adair, were 
admitted to some copyholds. 

A Manor of South Elmham is one of those whereof John, Lord Bardolf, 
died seised, leaving William his son and heir, aged 14, then in ward with 
Sir Michael Poynings, having purchased the same of Queen Philippa. As to 
date of John, Lord Bardolf's, death, see account of Manor of Ilketshall 
Bardolf, in this Hundred. 



'I.P.M., 4 Hen. VIII. 439; see Manor of 'Fine, Hil. 21 Eliz. 
Good's, Wilby, in Hoxne Hundred. 




176 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ELMHAM, SOUTH (ST. MARY}. 

OUR manors vrr held in this place in Saxon times. The 
first was held by Oskrtrl, a freeman by commendation and 
soc under Hi-. Imp Stigand, and consisted of 30 acres, a bordai , 
a plonghteam, 2 acres of meadow, and the fifth part of a 
mill. The value was 8s., but at the lime of the Sunvv 
rendered los. 8d., when it belonged to the fee of the Bishop 
of Thetford. Another holding belonging to the same fee 
was formerly that of eight freemen by commendation, soc, and sac, under 
Bishop Aylmer, consisting of 107 acres, 2 ploughteams (reduced to a team 
and a half at the time of the Survey), and half a church with 12 acres. The 
value was IDS., but rendered 315. ^d. at the time of the Survey.' 

The second and third manors were held at the time of the Survey by 
William de Noers of the fee of the Bishop of Thetford. The second was 
formerly held by Brihtnorth, a freeman under commendation to Aylmer, 
and consisted of 30 acres, 4 bordars, a ploughteam and half belonging to 
the men, 2 acres of meadow, and wood for the maintenance of 4 hogs. 
The value was 55. 4^., increased to 2os. at the time of the Survey. Besides 
there was a holding of three freemen under commendation and soc and sac 
to Aylmer, consisting of 38 acres, i ploughteams, wood for the support of 
4 hogs, and 3 acres of meadow valued at 6s., increased to us. Sd. at the 
time of the Survey. 3 

The third manor was. formerly held by a freeman by commendation 
and soc under Stigand, consisting of 30 acres, 2 bordars (increased to 8 at 
the time of the Survey), and i ploughteam (increased to 2 at that time), 
2 acres of meadow, and wood for the maintenance of 4 hogs. Under him 
a freeman held 16 acres and half a ploughteam (altered to 2 oxen at the 
time of the Survey). The value was ios. J 

The last manor mentioned was held at the time of the Survey by 
Geoffrey, of Eudo, son of Spirwic. It had formerly been held by Offa, a 
freeman under commendation to Stigand, and consisted of 2 carucates of 
land, 16 villeins, n bordars, 2 serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 13 
belonging to the men. Also a rouncy, 2 beasts, 6 hogs, 26 sheep, 12 acres 
of meadow, wood sufficient to support 20 hogs, and half a mill, the entire 
value being 405. When the Survey was taken some of the details had 
entirely altered. There were 10 villeins, 14 bordars, 9^ ploughteams 
belonging to the men, and the value was Cos. There was also half a church 
with 10 acres valued at i6d. 

In the same township was an estate of two freemen under Stigand's 
commendation, consisting of 30 acres, 3 bordars, and a half, 2j ploughteams, 
wood for the maintenance of 2 hogs, and 3^ acres of meadow. The value 
was formerly 75., increased at the time of the Survey to IDS. 8d. It was a 
league long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 2od. 4 

MANOR OF FLIXTON. 

This was the estate of William, Bishop of Thetford, at the time of the 
Survey, and was afterwards held by Geoffrey de Hanes, lord of Hillington, 
in Norfolk. 

'Dom. ii: 379. 3 Dom. ii. 381; 

Dora. ii. 380, 3806. 4 Dom. ii. 4346. 



ELMHAM, SOUTH (ST. MARY). 177 

In the reign of King Hen. III. the lordship was held by Bartholomew 
de Creke, who married Margery, daughter of the said Geoffrey. 

By a pleading at Ipswich in 1239-40 Robert de Pirko, William de 
Blund, and Robert de Blund were found to owe to Sir Bartholomew de 
Creke 140 out of the estate of Flixton and Helmingham assigned for the 
maintenance or jointure of Margery. About 1252' Margery de Creke, 
being then a widow and resident at her manor house of Flixton, transferred 
her interests here to an Augustin Nunnery, of the Order of Fontebrault, in 
Flixton. The grant is made for the salvation of Geoffrey de Hanes (or Anos), 
her father and Sara her mother, and of Bartholomew de Crek her late 
husband, and with the consent of Robert de Crek, her first-born son. The 
deed will be found amongst the Stowe Charters in the British Museum. 2 



The grant is given by Suckling, and is as follows : 

" Sciant psentes et futuri quod ego Margeria de Crek in pura et legitima 
viduatate mea, pro salute anime mee, et pro salute animarum bene memorie 
Gafrid: de Hanes, ptris mei, et . . . matris mei, et omnium ante- 
cessorum, et pro salute anime Bartholomei de Crek, quondam mariti mei, 
et animarum liberorum meor : successor : et aliarum familiarum mearum, de 
pleno assensu Robti de Creke, primogeniti filij mei et heredis, dedi, con- 
cessi, et hac psenti carta confirmavi in pura et perpetua elempsinam mulieri- 
bus religiosis servientibz deo, et See Marie, et Sancte Katharine, et omnibus 
sanctis in capitali messuagio meo de Flixton, regulam Beati Augustini 
p-fessor : et quasdam alias regulares observantes, &c., totum manerium meu 
de Flixton, quod ad me jure hereditari, spectabat, &c. 3 It will be seen that 
the grant was of the capital manor house, but it did not include the manor 
itself. This latter was exchanged with the priories in 1289, for this year 
we find that Beatrice the prioress conveyed by fine her right in the churches 
of North Creake, in Norfolk, and Combes, in Suffolk, to Roger Fitz Peter 
Fitz Osbert and Sarah his wife, who was the daughter of Margery and heiress 
of the Creke family, in consideration of a grant by them of the Manor of 
Flixton, with the moiety of the church and the advowsons of churches 
of Fundenhall and Denston, and lands in Wilby, in Suffolk, and North 
Creake ; and in 1320 John, Bishop of Norwich, granted his moiety of the 
advowson of the church of Flixton in exchange for that of Helmingham ; 
and the whole rectory was then appropriated to the prioress. 4 The deed 
is still preserved, and will be found amongst the Stowe Charters in the 
British Museum. 5 In 1312 we meet with a fine of part of " Flixton Manor " 
levied by Robert de Sandcroft and Joan his wife against John, parson of 
Sandcroft church, and John de Redenhale,' and in 1331 with a fine levied 
by Sir Bartholomew Bateman against Robert de Sandcroft and Joan his 
wife. 7 Amongst the Campbell Charters in the British Museum we find a 
release by Robert, son of Bartholomew de Creke to the nunnery of Flixton, 
of the manor and the advowson of the moiety of the church of Flixton. 8 

'Suckling gives the date as 1258, and the * Stowe Ch. 291, confirmed 12611; Ib. 293. 

catalogue of the Stowe Charters in 3 Suckling, Hist, of Suffolk, vol. i. 100. 

the British Museum assigns this 4 Page, Hist, of Suffolk, 335. 

charter to 1258-9, but it is appre- 'Stowe Ch. 364. 

hended that the grantor died in Feet of Fines, 5 Edw. II. 29. 

1252. See Comb's Manor, in Stow 7 Feet of Fines, 5 Edw. III. 

Hundred and Bocking Manor, Hel- 8 C. 1460. Campb. iii. 7; 
mingham, in Bosmere and Claydon 
Hundred; 



178 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

With Flixton priory the manor remained until the dissolution of that 
house, when it passed to the Crown, and was granted in 1532 to Cardinal 
Wolsey for the augmentation of the rentals and endowment of his colleges 
at Oxford and Ipswich. The disgrace of the great minister, however, 
brought the manor back to his Sovereign, who in 1544 granted it to John 
Tasburgh. 1 Of the Tasburgh family Suckling writes : " The Tasburghs 
who thus acquired the site and possessions of Flixton Priory, were of direct 
Saxon origin. Toralf, a freeman of Bishop Stigand, held a manor in the 
parish of Tasburgh, in Norfolk, at the time of the Conqueror's Survey, 
whose successors were Richard and Matthew his sons ; and Ralf who lived 
in 1199 and afterwards about 1239 assumed the name of Tasburgh from the 
place of his residence. In 1247, Ralf de Tasburgh was lord of Boylands, 
or the woodland manor, in Tasburgh, and had infange thereof, or liberty to 
try all theft committed by his tenants, in his own court-baron and leet 
there ; and to execute them, and take their forfeited goods. In 1280 his 
son Roger sold this estate to Sir Richard de Boyland. About this time 
they migrated to Suffolk, and we find them settled at St. Peter's, South 
Elmham, early in the reign of Edward III.'" 

The John Tasburgh to whom the above grant was made was the son 
of John Tasburgh, of St. Peter's, South Elmham, and Elizabeth his wife, 
daughter of John Davy, of Norwich, and widow of one Tracey. On his 
death in 1552' he was succeeded by his son and heir, Sir John Tasburgh, 
of Flixton Abbey, who married Lettice, daughter of James Cressye. 

On Sir John Tasburgh's death the manor seems to have passed to his 
4th son John, who married Penelope, daughter and coheir of John Ramsey, 
of Wickmere, in Norfolk ; and on his death in 1607 the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Sir John Tasburgh, Knt. 4 His name occurs among the 
knights created by Jas. I. at the Charterhouse on his first arrival in London. 
He married Lettice, the only daughter and heir of - - Bateman, by whom 
he had lands of considerable value near Flixton. His estate was valued at 
1,400 per annum. On his death, 24th April, 1629, the manor passed to 
his widow Lettice, and then to their son and heir, Charles Tasburgh. 

In 1629 we find amongst the Chancery Papers in the Record Office a 
grant of wardship of Charles, son and heir of Sir John Tasburgh, to Robert, 
Earl of Monmouth. 5 

Amongst the State Papers we find a statement in 1651 that the estate 
of Charles Tasburgh having been eight years under sequestration for 
recusancy, the manor house of Flixton, Boy's Hall, a bridge at Homersfield, 
and the manor house of Elnetham [or Elmham] Hall were much decayed. 8 

Amongst the State Papers in 1652' we find a notice of a petition by 
James Dix, of Flixton, for restoration of a house in Flixton leased to him 
in 1636 by the trustees of Sir John Tasburgh for the life of Lady Lettice 
Tasburgh for whose recusancy it had been sequestered at 40 rent. In 1651 
petitioner allowed his own daughters and son in turn to live there, but they 

1 In the reign of Edw. IV. the priory had * History of Surf, vol. i: 197. 

granted a lease to Thomas Tasburgh, M.P.M., 6 Edw. VI. 

son of John Tasburgh, of St. * There is a letter from him to F. Gawdy in 
Peter's, South Elmham, of an 1622 amongst the Egerton MSS. in 

enclosure called Myttemounteclos the British Museum (Eger. 2715). 

abutting on the road called Pycho- 'D.K.R. 43 App. i. p. 133. 

nesway leading towards Bungay 6 Cal. of Comp. 2708. 

(19 Edw. IV. Stowe Ch; 373.) T S.P. 1652, Cal. of Comp. 3046. 



ELMHAM, SOUTH (ST. MARY). 179 

failed in one half-year's rent, and the estate was disposed of to another ; 
he (the petitioner) was willing to pay the rent. Charles Tasburgh died 
in 1657, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Richard Tasburgh, who 
married Margaret, daughter of Sir George Heneage, of Henton, Knt. She 
died in 1705, aged 70, and a monument to her memory was erected by her 
husband in Flixton church. He died in 1716 at the age of 83, and the 
manor passed to his son and heir, John Tasburgh, who died in 1719, when the 
manor passed to Lettice, his daughter and heir, married to John Wyborne 
(or Waborne) of Hawkwell, in Kent, who survived her husband and died 
ist July, 1738, aged 73. 

The manor was subsequently purchased by William Adair, who died 
in 1787, when it went to his son and heir, Alexander Adair, who died 8th 
Oct. 1814, at the age of 66, from which time the manor has descended in 
the same course as the Manor of Cratfield Le Roos, in Blything Hundred, 
and is now vested in Sir Frederick E. S. Adair, Bart., of Flixton Hall. 

Flixton Hall was built about 1615 by Sir John Tasburgh, and was a 
noble structure. It was in the style called " Inigo Jones' Gothic," and 
was said to have been one of his design, but it had the earlier characteristics 
of Shafto, like the ornamental chimneys of the Elizabethan style at the 
bayed projections of the wings and centre. The whole edifice has a vast 
number of windows, all of them pedimented. The doorway was arched and 
flanked by coupled columns supporting a pediment. The pillars were 
placed on pedestals (ornamented with lozenges) elevated on the base. The 
building was battlemented ; other corners of the wings had buttresses rising 
similar to chimney shafts. The whole appearance was noble, and the building 
was a good specimen of the mixed style prevalent in the I7th century, but 
not a highly-enriched one not so highly, at least, as many of the old halls 
to be met with in Suffolk and Norfolk. It was originally surrounded by a 
moat, which some years ago was filled up. 

" Many mansions," says Suckling, " in almost every part of England 
have been attributed to his skill, with scarcely a proof of any kind, and not 
a few of which are decidedly too commonplace for the fertility of his con- 
ception. Flixton Hall, however, by whomsoever designed, is the pro- 
duction of no tame or frigid genius ; there is a lofty elevation, an intricity 
and variety of outline, aided by deep bays and bold projections, which, 
with the tall pinnacles and clustered chimneys give a picturesque effect to 
the whole pile, vainly sought for in modern mansions. It was originally 
surrounded by a moat and approached by a drawbridge, which have long 
been removed and filled up ; and is said to occupy the site of the very 
ancient manor house of the Batemans, as already mentioned. If any 
papers relating to the erection of this mansion be in existence, they would 
furnish curious and interesting details of the price of labour and materials 
in the i7th century. Tradition has preserved an anecdote connected with 
this house, that when Chas. II., in his journey to Yarmouth, passed by this 
building, he was so struck with its grand and noble appearance that he 
enquired who resided in it, and upon being told by one of his attendants 
that it was a Popish dog who lived there, his Majesty immediately 
answered that the dog had a very beautiful kennel.'" 

The hall of the mansion was a spacious room filled with antique furni- 
ture and armour. The large carved fireplace was furnished with logs in 

1 Suckling, Hist, of Suff; vol. i. p. 200. 



i8o 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 







ELMHAM, SOUTH (ST. MARY.) 181 

the style of the past ages, and many interesting family pictures hung round 
its walls. A flight of stairs led from the hall to the saloon, the entrance 
door of which was elaborately carved in oak with scroll work, foliage, and 
figures in the style of the Renaissance, but rather more chaste in its design 
than usual. 

The very year Suckling penned his account of the hall it was totally 
destroyed by fire caused by the soot lodged on a beam which crossed the 
chimney in the hall at a considerable height from the fireplace having caught 
fire, and communicating with the floor above. The title deeds, papers, 
and other documents were fortunately removed in time to a place of safety. 
The following account of the fire appeared in the St. James's Chronicle, 
I2th and isth December, 1846 : " Late on Saturday night a dreadful fire 
broke out at Flixton Hall, the residence of Sir Robert Shafto Adair. It appears 
that at 12 o'clock at night a boy was passing along the road adjoining the 
Park when his attention was called to a great body of flame which appeared 
to be issuing from the windows of the Hall. He immediately gave an 
alarm and aroused the domestics. Shortly afterwards the engines arrived 
and begun to play on the burning pile, but not to much effect, as the fire 
had got such a hold as to defy all their efforts to stop it. The mansion 
was destroyed with all its valuable and ancient pictures (one worth 1,000 
guineas) and costly furniture. Nothing was saved from the devouring 
element, . . . The family were in London at their residence in St. 
James's Square, and there were only six domestics in the house at the time. 
The actual loss is stated to amount to 60,000. Part of the property is 
insured in the Norwich Union Fire Office." 

Of the artistic treasures of the mansion we find the following account 
in " Rand's Pocket Book " of some few years before the fire : " In the Hall 
are busts of the Right Hon. C. J. Fox, Lord Keppel, and Gen. Wolfe. On 
the Staircase above the door entering the Saloon is a fine bust of Inigo 
Jones who built the house. The Saloon contains 34 paintings by various 
masters, amongst which are the following: A Madonna and child ; St. Peter 
and the Angels ; Fruit and Flowers, by Van Os ; St. Mark's at Venice, by 
Canaletti ; Landscapes by Tillemenus ; Sea pieces by Vander Valde, &c. 
The Library contains a choice collection of books, a portrait of W. Adair, 
Esq., with his groom and two horses ; a portrait of the Duke of Bolton's 
famous horse, Sweepstakes ; both this and the Saloon are excellent rooms. 
In an adjoining bedroom is a portrait of Gen. Huss, of Ellinghouse ; a 
Turkish Lady ; Battle piece ; Joseph and Potifar's wife, &c., all very 
finely painted. In the other bedrooms are the following paintings : St. 
John the Baptist's head ; St. Agnes ; Mark Antony and Cleopatra ; a 
Sleeping Venus ; Lucretia, &c. In the Dining-room is a portrait of the 
present proprietor of this mansion, whose pleasant countenance confirms 
the public report of his politeness and urbanity. In the Drawing-room 
are judiciously collected together the portraits of the late Duke of Rich- 
mond, his father, his mother and sister, by Sir Joshua Reynolds ; the late 
Duke of Cumberland, Sir Charles Saunders, by Sir Joshua Reynolds, Lord 
Anson, Keppel, Lord Albemarle, Gen. Hughson, Lord George Lennox, 
Gen. Napier," &c.' 

Arms of TASBURGH : Argent, a chevron between three pilgrims' 
staffs, on each suspended a pouch, Sable, garnished Or. 

1 See Illustrated London News, igth Dec. 1846. 



182 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK 

BOYSES MANOR. 

The Manors of Sandcroft, Newhall, Boyses, Flixton, &c., appear to 
have grown out of the greater or paramount manor of South Elmham at a 
very early period, for though Almaham or Elmham is returned in Domesday 
as the lordship of the Bishop of Thetford, it is even then said " alii ibi 
tenent." 

This manor was in the Confessor's day the estate of Offa a freeman, 
and at the time of the Survey of Eudo Fitz Spiruic under whom Geoffry 
held. 

Sir Edward de Blois, Knt., perhaps had this manor, for he had lands 
and hereditaments here, and died about 1376, leaving a daughter and heir 
Mary, who married Sir John Howard, Knt. 

In the time of Edw. IV. the manor was held by Sir Gilbert Debenham, 
who died in 1481,' when it passed to his son and heir, Sir Gilbert Debenham,* 
who was attainted in 1487, and died without issue in 1493. 

In the time of Edw. VI. the manor became vested in John Tasburgh, 
who died in 1552, 3 from which time it has passed in the same course as the 
main manor. 



1 1.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 48. Coddenham, in Bosmere and Clay- 

1 See Tattingstone Manor and Vaux Manor, don Hundred. 

Little Wenham, in Samford Hun- 'I. P.M., 6 Edw. VI. 

dred, and Bridge Place Manor, 




HOMERSFtELD. 183 

HOMERSFIELD (OR ST. MARY SOUTH ELMHAM). 

HERE were two manors in this place in Saxon times. The 
first was that of Aylmer the Bishop, and consisted of 5 caru- 
cates of land, 16 villeins, 12 bordars, 4 serfs, 2 ploughteams 
in demesne (increased to 3 at the time of the Survey) and 
10 belonging to all the men (reduced to 5 at the time of the 
Survey, but 6 might be made up). Also there were 12 acres 
of meadow, wood to support 600 hogs (reduced to 200 at 
the time of the Survey), and a mill. There was also a church with 12 
acres, and 3 horses when the Domesday tenant took it, and which remained. 
There was also 6 beasts, 26 hogs, and 200 sheep. With the soc it was 
valued at 12, and at the time of the Survey rendered 16. The Survey 
goes on to say : " Over the Four thing of Elmham he has soc and sac except 
over Bishop Stigand's men ; and Baldwin the Abbot according to the 
testimony of the Hundred had a writ of King Edward that he ought himself 
to have soc and sac over St. Edmunds land and over his men." At the 
time of the Survey this manor was held by William, Bishop of Thetford.' 

The other manor was held by a freeman under Aylmer's commendation, 
and consisted of 40 acres, 2 bordars, 2 ploughteams (reduced to i at the 
time of the Survey), and 2 acres of meadow. Also a church with 30 acres, 
valued at 6s. Sd. (increased to gs. ^d. at the time of the Survey). At that 
time this manor was held of the fee of the Bishop of Thetford. 

Furthermore, in the same township was a holding of 23 freemen, 
consisting of 80 acres and 6 ploughteams (reduced by i at the time of the 
Survey). The value was 405. (reduced at that time to 305.). It was a 
league long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 2od* 

Under the head " Hetheburgafella " in Domesday Survey also appear 
two holdings in Saxon times. One was that of six freemen under commen- 
dation to Burchard, and consisted of 60 acres and 2 ploughteams (reduced 
to i at the time of the Survey). The value was ios., increased when the 
Survey was taken to us. Sd. and 900 herrings. The Domesday tenant 
was Hugh de Montfort. 3 

The other holding was that of three freemen under Burchard's com- 
mendation, consisting of 22 acres, valued at 45. At the time of the Survey 
this was the estate of Earl Hugh. 4 

MANOR OF HOMERSFIELD. 

In the time of Edward the Confessor this was the estate of Oliver, 
Bishop of Thetford, and the manor and advowson continued in the 
Bishopric of Norwich 5 until the time of Hen. VIII. 

In the reign of Hen. VIII. the manor was taken from the bishop and 
granted as parcel of the Manor of South Elmham in 1540 to Sir Edward 
North, since which time it has passed in the same course as that manor 
and of Flixton, in this Hundred, and is now vested in Sir Frederick E. S. 
Adair, Bart., of Flixton Hall. 

Suckling 6 mentions that in the Collections of the late Thomas Martin 
was a confirmation of 6 acres of land in Homersfield to Robt. de Sandcroft, 

1 Dom; ii. 379. 5 The Bishop of Norwich had a grant of a 
'Dom. ii. 380. fair here in 12.27, (Close Rolls, n 

3 Dom. ii. 407. Hen. III. 4). 

*Domj ii: 3016. 'Vol. i. p. 213. 



184 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ancestor to Abp. Sandcroft, which Robt. Husbond, tenant or servant to 
Jphn of Oxford, Bishop of Norwich, gave him ; and of 3^ acres which 
(icrvaise, son of Robt. Husbond, sold to the aforesaid Robt. de Sandcroft 
for 45. and released and abjured it in the bishop's own chamber at 
Homersfield ; to be held by the rent of i6d. a year to the bishop's manor 
of Homersfield, and $d. to every aid, or tax, laid on that town. 

MANOR OF LIMBOURNE OR LYMBURN CALLED LYMBORN PRIORIES. 

This manor is mentioned as " Limburna " in the Domesday Survey. 
The Abbot of St. Edmund held 30 acres of land, 5 bordars, a ploughtoam, 
2 acres of meadow, and the fifth part of a mill valued at lod. The soc and 
sac belonged to Bishop William. 1 

The manor was alienated by the Abbot of St. Edmund soon after the 
Norman Survey, for Roger Bigot confirmed to the nuns of Bungay " his 
lands of Limburne," 2 in 1160, though the abbot always retained an interest 
in it, and at the dissolution of Bungay nunnery, when the rental of the 
Manor of Limburne was 3. 135. $d. had an annual payment of is. The 
first court of Lady Margaret Cabel, prioress, was held in 1434, in which year 
the Court Rolls preserved begin. In 1453 Anne Rothenhale, prioress, 
held her first court, and in 1521 Anne Page, prioress, held hers. The site of 
this manor was held in farm before the Dissolution by Robert Middleton, 
of Middleton Hall, in Mendham. Being parcel of the possessions of Bungay 
priory, it was included in the grant of that establishment i8th Dec. 1537, 
to Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, by Hen. VIII. It was forfeited in 1546, and 
in 1553 granted to John and Thomas Wright, but being restored to the 
Duke of Norfolk on the accession of Queen Mary, passed from Thomas, Duke 
of Norfolk, to his grandson Thomas, who sold in 1565 to Bassingbourne 
Gawdy. 3 

Suckling states that in 1564 or the following year Richard Wheatley, 
rector of the parish, died seised of the manor, and about 1567 James, son 
of Edward Berdewell, of Mendham, as heir male of his family, released it 
to Bassingbourne Gawdy. 

Page says the manor came to the Gawdys by marriage of Sir Bassing- 
bourne Gawdy with Anne Wootton, the heiress of the Berdewells. However 
this may be, all agree that Bassingbourne Gawdy held the manor, and died 
seised of it in 1569, when it passed to his son and heir, Sir Bassingbourne 
Gawdy, Knt. 4 

On the death of Sir Bassingbourne Gawdy in 1606 the manor passed to 
his son and heir, Framlingham Gawdy, 5 and on his death, 25th Feb. 1654-5, 
went to his son and heir, Sir William Gawdy, ist Bart., of West Harling, 
co. Norfolk. It then passed to John Rayner, who in 1696 held his first 
court. 

In 1709 James Whiting, of Homersfield, was lord, and towards the end 
of the i8th century the manor passed to William Adair, who died in 1787, 

1 Dom. ii. 370. father of another creation, Sir 

*Toph. 13. Charles, created a baronet 2oth 

1 Fine, Trin. 7 Eliz. April, 1661. 

*He was the grandfather of one baronet 'See Manor of Mandeville, Steraneld, in 

Sir William, and the great-grand- Plomesgate Hundred. 



ILKETSHALL. 185 

and in 1789 was purchased by Alexander Adair, from which time the manor 
has passed in the same course as the Manor of Cratfield Le Roos, in Blything 
Hundred. 

Kirby, in his day, says : " There are but few or no tenants belonging 
to this manor, and it would scarce be known if it were not for the water- 
mill which still retains the name of Limber Mill." 

Amongst the MSS. in the British Museum is the grant of a native in 
Limburne in 1329.' And a precipe on a covenant concerning the Manor 
of Homersfield in 1552 is amongst the Additional Charters in the British 
Museum. 2 It is by Thomas Rous and Katherine his wife and Giles Hansard 
to John Skipwith and John Blenerhasset, and is dated at Westminster 
22nd Jan. 5 Edw. VI. 



'Campb. xii. 7. 'Add. Ch. 25273. 

Z 




186 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ILKETSHALL. 

IHREE manors were held here in Saxon times, all of which 
were held by Earl Hugh at the time of the Survey. The 
first was held of him by Warin, son of Burn win, and formerly 
by Wolsey, a freeman under Gurth's commendation, 
consisting of 2 carucates of land, 5 villeins, 13 bordars, 
6 serfs (which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), 
3 ploughteams in demesne (reduced to one at that time), 
and 2 belonging to the men (then reduced to i teams) ; also 4 acres of 
meadow, enough wood to support 10 hogs, half a mill, 5 hogs, and 16 goats, 
at the time of the Survey, and 30 sheep (increased to 40 at that time). 
The value was 405.' 

The second was formerly held by Alwin, a freeman under Wolsey 's 
commendation, and consisted of 60 acres, 10 bordars, a serf, a ploughteam 
in demesne and i belonging to the men, 2 acres of meadow, and wood 
sufficient to support 10 hogs, valued at xos. 

Furthermore in Ilketshall, Mettingham, and Shipmeadow there were 
seven freemen under Wolsey's commendation, with 80 acres, a bordar, 3 
ploughteams (reduced to 2 when the Survey was taken), and 2 acres of 
meadow, valued at xos. 

The third manor was formerly held by Burchard, a freeman, and con- 
sisted of 2 carucates of land, 5 villeins, 7 bordars, 5 serfs (disappearing at 
the Survey), 3 ploughteams in demesne (which were reduced to i at the 
time but there might be more), and 3 belonging to the men (reduced to 2 
at the time of the Survey, but these also might be restored. Also wood 
to support 30 hogs, 4 acres of meadow, 2 rouncies (reduced to I at the time 
of the Survey, when there were 2 beasts) and 60 sheep. The value of the 
whole was 305., increased by IDS. at the time of the Survey. 

Earl Hugh had three other estates in this place. The first was formerly 
that of a freeman under Burchard's commendation, consisting of 20 acres, 
5 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne and one belonging to the men, wood 
to support 10 hogs, and i acres of meadow, valued at 55. There was also 
a church with 20 acres, valued at 2os. 

The second estate was formerly that of three freemen under Burchard's 
commendation, consisting of 30 acres and a ploughteam, valued at 55.; and 
the third was formerly that of a freeman, consisting of 12 acres, invaded 
by Ralph, a man under the constable. Of him Earl Ralph was seised on 
the day he made forfeiture. Furthermore, in the same township was an 
estate of a freeman, consisting of 10 acres, held by Ralph Bigot. This 
estate was invaded by Burnwin against his right.* 

The only other estate in this place mentioned was held by Goodrich 
the steward and formerly by Anand, a freeman under Adwin's commenda- 
tion, consisting of 30 acres, 5 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne and half 
belonging to the men, also an acre of meadow. The value was 8os. $d., 
increased at the time of the Survey by ios. 3 

ILKETSHALL MANOR. 

This district comprehends the parishes of St. Andrew, St. John, St. 
Laurence, St. Margaret, and All Saints, Mettingham, to which the two 

'Dora, ii., 300, 301, 30ifr. 3 Dom. ii. 356. 

"Dom. ii. 300*. 301, 301*. 



ILKETSHALL. 187 

parishes of St. Mary and Holy Trinity, Bungay, were added, and make up 
what are commonly called the seven parishes in contradistinction to the 
South Elmhams, or " The nine parishes." 

Sir Gilbert de Ilketshall was lord of Hedenham and Kelling, in Norfolk, 
and of Ilketshall, in Suffolk, in the reign of William Rufus. His son, Sir 
Thomas de Ilketshall, succeeded his father in the lordship, and his son, 
Gilbert de Ilketshall, in 1248 had a grant of free warren here. Gilbert's 
son and heir, Sir James de Ilketshall, married Maud, daughter of Richard 
de la Rokell, and died in 1262,' when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Sir James Ilketshall, who married Aliva, daughter of Sir Thomas Wayland, 
the notorious judge. In 1268 he mortgaged for 27 marks and a half of 
silver certain lands to the Lady Sarah, prioress of Bungay. In the following 
year he conveyed an acre of land and the advowson of the church of St. 
John Baptist, of Ilketshall, by fine to the priory of the Holy Cross, in Bungay. 

Sir James de Ilketshall died about 1312, when he was succeeded by 
his son and heir, Sir James de Ilketshall, who married Ida, daughter and 
coheir of Sir Robert de Stafford, Knt., by Gundreda his wife. Suckling 
mentions a deed dated 6th Edw. II. executed between Sir James de Ilket- 
shall (of course, the father, who died this year) of the one part, and James 
his son and Ida his wife of the other part, whereby James and Ida grant 
the Manor of Kelling, in Norfolk, to Sir James for life. 2 Sir James and 
Ida left two sons, Sir Philip the younger and Sir Robert de Ilketshall the 
heir, who died 1381, for at that date Claricia " his late wife," was married 
to Sir Robert de Morley. By this Claricia Sir Robert de Ilketshall had two 
sons and four daughters. Sir Thomas de Ilketshall, who was the son and 
heir, married Isabel, daughter of - who afterwards remarried William 
Degvile. Sir Thomas Ilketshall died about I4i6, 3 leaving a son Philip 
and a daughter, who both died in the reign of Hen. VI. without issue. 

The manor seems to have passed to the de Norwich family by the 
middle of the I4th century. Davy even makes Sir Walter de Norwich, 
Knt., who died in 1326, lord, but it is not mentioned in his inquis. p.m., 
and does not seem to have come to the family till the time of his son, Sir 
John de Norwich. 

Sir John de Norwich* and Margaret his wife in 1355 levied a fine of 
the manor against William de Bergh, clerk, 5 and Sir John had a grant 
of free warren here in 1357," and died in 1362, 7 from which time to the time 
of his grandson, Sir John de Norwich, the manor passed in the same course 
as the Manor of Dalham, in Risbridge Hundred. 

He in 1373, the year before his death, without issue, granted the manor 
to Sir Robert Howard, 8 and subsequently Katharine de Brewse, cousin 
and heir of Sir John de Norwich, jun., released all right to the said Sir 
Robert Howard, who had licence in i3'82 with Sir John Plaiz, Sir Roger 
Boyes, and others, to remove the house of Ravenham to Mettingham and 
to endow the new establishment with this manor. 9 With the monastery 

1 1. P.M., 46 Hen. III. 54. I.P.M., 35 Edw. III. 9 ; 36 Edw. III. pt.ii. 

'Suckling, vol. i. p. 112. 6. 

3 Will, May, 1416, proved i7th April, 1417. 8 The manor is, notwithstanding, included in 

4 See Manor of Dalham, in Risbridge the inquis. p.m. of Sir John de 

Hundred. Norwich in 1374 (I.P.M., 48 Edw. 

5 Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. III. 2. III. 52). 

"Chart. Rolls, 31 Edw. III. 2. "I.P.M., Extent, 5 Rich. II. 88. 



i88 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Mettingham College the manor remained until its dissolution, when the 
King granted this manor in 1541 to Sir Thomas Denny. From Sir Thomas 
the manor is said to have passed to Sir Anthony Denny, his son and heir, 
and on Sir Anthony's death 5th Sept. 1549,' the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Sir Henry Denny, who married Honora, daughter of William, 
Lord Grey of Wilton, and on his death in 1573 the manor passed to his 
son and heir, Robert Denny, on whose death it went to his brother and 
heir, Sir Edward Denny, summoned to Parliament by writ directed to 
" Edwardo Denney de Watham Chiv' teste, &c., 27 Oct. 2 James I." 
[1604], and created Earl of Norwich in 1626. He married Lady Mary 
Cecil, daughter of Thomas, Earl of Essex, and died 2oth Dec. 1630, leaving 
an only daughter Honora, married to Sir James Hay, of Pitcorthie, co. 
Fife, who in 1615 was created Lord Hay, of Stanley, in the County of York, 
and afterwards Viscount Doncaster and Earl of Carlisle. They had issue 
a son James, 2nd Earl of Carlisle, and also a daughter Anne, who died 
young. James, the Earl, dying without issue, the barony of Denney and 
all the other titles became extinct. 

Arms of ILKETSHALL : Ar. a fesse between two chevrons Gules, and a 
canton Ermine. Of DENNEY : Gu. a saltier, Arg. between 12 crosses 
patee Or. 

WELLINGTON'S MANOR. 

This was held in 1372 by Sir John Howard, Knt., who granted it to 
John Playce, Robert Howard, and others. 

MANOR OF ILKETSHALL BARDOLPH'S. 

In the time of William the Conqueror this was the lordship of Hugh, 
Earl of Chester, and on his death in noo passed to his son and heir Richard, 
Earl of Chester, who was drowned with the sons of Hen. I. in 1120, dying 
without issue. 

The manor was held by Guy de Ferre and Eleanor his wife of the 
Honor of Lancaster in 1323, in which year he died seised.* And on the 
Close Rolls the following year we find an order to deliver to Simon de la 
Borde this manor taken into the King's hands on the death of Guy Ferre, 
as it was held as of the Honor of Lancaster, by the service of a moiety of a 
knight's fee, with remainder to the said Simon in tail, with remainder to the 
John de Claroun in tail. 3 

In 1337 Elizabeth de Burgh, wife of Sir Roger D'Amorie, Lord 
D'Amorie, granted to the King certain property in exchange for two parts 
of this manor and 20 rent which John de Ickford paid for the Manor of 
Clopton. 4 An entry on the Patent Rolls the same year explains the transac- 
tion. It is a release to Elizabeth de Burgh, late wife of Roger " Damory," 
to whom by charter the King had granted two parts of the manor, late 
of John, Earl of Lancaster, his brother, for her life, with 20 of rent which 
John de Ickford was bound for life to render yearly to the King for the 
Manor of Clopton, then in the King's hands by the death of the Earl without 
heirs of his body, and the reversion of the 3rd part of the former manor 
then held for life by Eleanor, late wife of Guy Ferre, and of the latter 
manor after the death of the said John to hold by the service of a fourth 

'I.P.M., 4 Edw. VI. 105. 'Close Rolls, 17 Edw. II. 16. 

I.P.M., 16 Edw. II. 66. O. n Edw. III. 44.- 



ILKETSHALL. 189 

part of a knight's fee, with remainder to John Bardolf, 1 Elizabeth his 
wife, daughter and heir of the said Roger and Elizabeth, and the heirs of 
Elizabeth in exchange for certain other lands. 3 And on the Close Rolls 
this same year there is a deed in yet more distinct terms. It testifies that 
the King has granted to Elizabeth de Burgh, late wife of Roger Damory, 
two parts of the manor for life, with remainder to Sir John Bardolf and 
Elizabeth his wife as daughter of Roger and Elizabeth and Roger's heir, and 
to her heirs, and has granted that the 3rd part of the manor which Eleanor, 
late wife of Guy Ferre holds as dower (which will revert to the King) shall 
remain to Elizabeth de Burgh for life with remainder as aforesaid, and the 
King has ordered Eleanor to make fealty for the said 3rd part. 1 " Five 
years later on the same Rolls we find an order to justices to proceed in a 
claim by Ela, late wife of John de " Claron," Knt., against this Elizabeth 
de Burgh for a third part of two parts of the manor as her dower, Elizabeth 
having pleaded that John de Eltham, Earl of Cornwall, was seised of two 
parts in demesne as of fee and died so seised without an heir, when the same 
passed to the King as brother and heir, and he by charter granted to Elizabeth 
for life, with remainder to John Bardolf and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of 
Roger Damory and the aforesaid Elizabeth de Burgh, formerly Roger's 
wife, and the heirs of Elizabeth. 4 

In 1351 the said Elizabeth de Burgh and John Bardolf and Elizabeth 
his wife were empowered to grant for life to John de Lenne, Ilketshall 
Manor, he rendering for the same o to Elizabeth for her life, and if she 
died to the said John Bardolf and Elizabeth his wife and the heirs of Eliza- 
beth, with reversion to the grantors and the heirs of the last-named 
Elizabeth. 5 John Lenne died seised in 1377. 6 

Elizabeth de Burgh remarried Theobald de Verdon, and died in 1360.' 
And we find an order on the Originalia Rolls to accept from John Bardolf 
and Elizabeth his wife security for a reasonable relief in respect of the 
above-named 20 rent of Ilketshall Manor. 8 

By an inquisition taken at Clopton, in Suffolk, Wednesday next before 
the Feast of the Nativity, 34 Edw. III. [1360], it was found " that Elizabeth 
de Burgh held for life the Manors of Clopton and Ilketshall of gift of the 
King, so that after her death the same should remain to John Bardolf 
and Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Roger Damory, and of the aforesaid 
Elizabeth, and to the heirs of the said Roger and to the heirs of the same 
Elizabeth, wife of the aforesaid John Bardolf, to hold of the King by the service 
of the fourth part of one knight's fee. And as to the Manor of Ilketshall 
that a fine had been levied with the licence of the King between John de 
Lenne querent and the said Elizabeth de Burgh and the aforesaid John 
Bardolf and Elizabeth his wife, def. of the same to wit, that they 
the said Elizabeth de Burgh, John Bardolf, and Elizabeth his wife had 
granted to the said John de Lenne the manor to hold to the said John Lenne 
of the King and his heirs by the service aforesaid all the life of him the said 
John de Lenne rendering to the foresaid Elizabeth de Burgh 20 yearly 
at the Feasts of Easter and St. Michael and after the decease of the same 

'He was the grandson of Hugh Bardolf, 5 Pat. Rolls, 25 Edw. III. pt. iii. 5; O. 
great-grandson of Doun Bardolf 25 Edw. III. 26. ; Feet of Fines, 25 

and Beatrix his wife, daughter and Edw. III. 31. 

heir of William de Warenne. 'I.P.M., 51 Edw. III. 20. 

'Pat. Rolls, ii Edw. III. pt. ii. 9. 7 I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 83. 

'Close Rolls, ii Edw. III. pt. ii. ^d. 24^. *O. 35 Edw. III. i. 

4 Close Rolls, 16 Edw. III. pt. i., 



190 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Elizabeth to the said John and Elizabeth his wife and to the heirs of the 
same Elizabeth 20 all the life of the said John de Lenne and that after 
his decease the aforesaid manor ought to revert to the aforesaid Elizabeth 
de Burgh, John Bardolf and Elizabeth his wife and to the heirs of the said 
Elizabeth wife of John to hold of the King and his heirs by the aforesaid 
service for ever." 

John Bardolf, 3rd Baron Bardolf, died 5th Aug. 1363, and amongst 
the Ministers' Accounts in the Public Record Office we find the Farmer's 
account of the lands in Ilketshall in the hands of the King during the 
minority of the heir of Sir John de Bardolf, and from this year to 1367.' 
Suckling and Burke both say John Bardolf died in 1371, and Blomefield 
says the 3rd Aug. 45 Edw. III. [1371], and it is quite true the manor is 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John Bardolf de Wirmegay, taken this 
year. 1 

Mr. Cockayne, with his usual accuracy, gives the correct date. The 
manor passed to Sir William Bardolf, Lord Bardolf of \Yirmegay, son and 
heir of John, Lord Bardolf, and on the Originalia Rolls of 1377 we find an 
order to take security and give seisin to William Bardolf, " son and heir 
of Elizabeth, wife of John Bardolf," of the manor called Bardolfueshalle, 
in Ilketshall, held of the King in chief by knight's service, 3 and another 
entry on the same Rolls that this William Bardolf gave one mark for homage 
to the King for the manor. 4 

Burke correctly supposes that William must have died about the 37 
Edw. III., and the error of Burke and Suckling has no doubt arisen from 
the fact that William did not have livery of his lands, as stated by Dugdale, 
until the 45 Edw. III. He was then in his 22nd year. 

From the death of William, 4th Lord Bardolf, 5 in 1385,' the manor 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Clopton, in Carlford Hundred, 
until the death of William, Viscount Beaumont, who was attainted, and 
died without issue 22nd Dec. 1508. 7 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Thomas, 
5th Lord Bardolf, in 1407;' of Avice his widow in 1421 ;' a moiety in that of 
Joan, wife of Sir William Philip, Knt.,in 1447 ;' and the other moiety is 
that of Anne, wife of Reginald Cobham,in 1554," and in that of William, 
Viscount Beaumont, in 1464. " 

In 1518 the manor was granted by the Crown to Sir Richard Wingfield, 
Knt., to hold by knight's service and the rent of one penny per annum. 
In 1539 a fine was levied of the manor by Sir Anthony Rous against Charles 
Wingfield and others, 13 and in 1543 a grant was obtained by Sir Anthony 
Rous from the Crown. He died 8th Feb. 1545,'* from which time to the 
time of Sir John Rous, created a baronet in 1660, the manor passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Henham, in Blything Hundred. 

In 1804 the manor was vested in Joseph Windham, who died in 1810, 
when it passed to his nephew (?), Sir William Wyndham Dalling, Bart., 
of Earsham, Norfolk, and Burwood Park, Surrey. 

Arms of DALLING : Ermine on a bend, Or, three acorns, proper. 

1 37 to 43 Edw. III. Bundle 1000, No. 6. I. P.M., 13 Hen. IV. 4. 

'I. P.M., 45 Edw. III. 7. M.P.M., 9 Hen. V. n. 

S O. 51 Edw. III. 3. "I.P.M., 25 Hen. VI. 29, 30. 

0. 51 Edw. III. *6. " I.P.M., 32 Hen. VI. 26. 

'SeeManorofClopton.inCarlfordHundred. "I.P.M., 3 Edw. IV. 30. 

I.P.M., 9 Rich. II. II. -JFine, Hil. 31 Hen. VIII: 

'Harl. MSS. 756, fol. 19, 20. ' I. P.M., I Edw. VI. 



ILKETSHALL. 191 

ILKETSHALL SECKFORD MANOR. 

The first mention of this manor is in a Chancery action pending some 
time between 1433 and 1484, in which John Hoo the younger sued John 
Jermy as to it, and a tenement called Kynges tenement,' and in the year 
1484 we meet with a fine levied of the manor by Jacob Hobert and John 
Everard against John Kyllyngworth and Agnes his wife. a In 1542 a fine 
was levied by John Byrlyng against John Everard, 3 and in 1550 by Richard 
Vynnger against William Gyrlynges and others. 4 

About 1600 the manor belonged to Isaac Cooper, who had his seat here ; 
for Judith Eachard, widow, by her will dated 27th June, 1657, authorised 
John Eachard, gent., and the Rev. Laurence Eachard, clerk, of Yoxford, 
her executors, to sell " all that her manor of Ilketshall Seckford, and all 
her capital messuages thereupon built, situate and being in the parish of 
St. Laurence, in Ilketshall, &c., which were devised to her by the last will 
and testament of Isaac Cooper, late of St. Laurence aforesaid, Esq., her late 
deceased father." 

Suckling, who gives this information, adds : " In 1662 the executors 
surrendered to John Vynar, Gent., and in 1671 Richard Vynar, his brother 
and heir, was admitted." The manor, however, is here treated as a copy- 
hold interest, which is absurd on the face. 

In 1696 the manor was held by Samuel Pycroft, clerk, and in 1710 
Samuel, his son and heir, was lord. 

Arms of EACHARD, granted or confirmed in 1672 by Sir Edward Bysshe, 
Clarenceux : Erm. on a bend Azure 3 chess rooks Or. 

MANOR OF SHERLOCK'S. 

This was the lordship of Roger Rookwood, of Euston, in 1458, and on 
his death in 1482 passed to his son and heir, Roger Rookwood, and then 
appears to have devolved in the same course as the Manor of Euston, in 
Blackbourn Hundred, and to have vested in Joan or Jane, daughter and 
coheir of Roger Rookwood, who married Christopher Calthorpe, son of 
James Calthorpe, of Calthorpe. It is stated that in 1564 the manor was 
vested in Sir James Calthorpe, son and heir of the said Christopher 
Calthorpe. 

A fine was levied of this manor under the name " Shurlokkys Manor" 
and also of a moiety of the Manor of Badley in 1544 by John Eyer against 
Robert Rokewoode and others, 5 and in 1554 by Richard Catlyn and others 
against Roger Rokewood and others. 6 

MANOR OF ST. ANDREW. 

St. Andrew Ilketshall was the lordship of James de Ilketshall in 1281. 
The manor in the time of Hen. VIII. belonged to George Duke, and passed 
on his death to his son and heir, Edward Duke, who levied a fine of it the 
2nd May, 1562. 7 

In 1563 it was held by Sir Henry Denny, who sold it that year to Sir 
Nicholas Bacon, 8 from whom it devolved probably in the same course as 

1 E.C.P. Bundle 41, 237. 5 Fine, Trin. 36 Hen. VIII. 

5 Feet of Fines, 2 Rich. III. 23. 'Fine, Mich. 2 Mary I. 

J Fine, Hil. 34 Hen. VIII. '4 Eliz. 19. 

'Fine, Mich. 4 Edw. VI. "Fine, Hil. 5 Eliz. 



192 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



the Manor of Hinderclay,in Blackbourn Hundred, upon Sir Edmund Bacon, 
Bart., who sold it in 1657 to William Gymmingham, of St. John's, Ilketshall, 
who by his will dated 8th Oct. 1658, left his wife Rebecca a life interest 
therein, and directed it to be sold on her decease. She held her first court 
I2th Jan. 1658, and had the manor until 1675, when she alienated it, with 
the property called St. John's Hall to John Hunt, and it became united 
with the Mettingham Castle estate, and passed from 1675 to at least 1814 
in the same course as the Manor of Mettingham, in this Hundred. 

The manor in 1846 belonged to the Rev. Jeremy Day. 

The suit of all the commons and waste lands within the parish appear 
to belong to this manor, there being divers presentments for surcharging 
- for persons commoning, not being tenants of the Manor, and for encroach- 
ments and nuisances thereon. 

MANOR OF ELLIS'S AND STRATTONS. 

Suckling makes this manor part of Little Redisham. It was held by 
Peter Fitz Osbert, who died in 1275, and it passed to his son and heir, 
Roger Fitz Peter Fitz Osbert, who in 1286 levied a fine of the manor against 
Guy Ferre, 1 and died in 1303 without issue." The following year there 
is an authority for Roger to retain this manor on reselling the Manors of 
\Yathe and Somerleyton. J 

In 1315 we meet with a fine of Ilketshall Manor levied by the said 
Guy Ferre against John Bacon, clerk, and Adam Bacon. 4 In the opening 
of the 15th century the manor was held by the Goneld family, and Thomas 
Goneld died seised thereof, when it passed to his son and heir, William 
Goneld, subject to the life interest of his mother. 

Davy enters as lords of Ellis, Morgan de Seckford, John de Seckford, 
and Joan de Seckford as holding the lordship at various times, but without 
any dates ; and then Thomas Croftes, of Westhall, who died without 
issue in 1474. 

But we find that by a deed dated at Ilketshall " in festo purifications 
beate Marie Virginis" anno 1422, William Goneld, son of Margery Belstede, 
releases to Thomas Croftes, of Beccles, and others his manors of Strattons 
and Elyes, with other lands and hereditaments in Norfolk and Suffolk, which 
he inherited of Thomas Goneld his father ; and in 1428 Margery Belstede 
by deed dated at Ilketshall " in puria viduatate " releases to Thomas 
Belstede, her son, all her claims which she then had or ever had in the manors 
of Strattons and Elyses lying in the parishes of Ilketshall and Redisham 
Parva. Thomas Crofts and Joan his wife held their first court in 1470. 
The family of Crofts did not long hold the manor, for in 1476 Thomas 
Crofts, Edward Jenny, Henry Rous, Thomas Banyard, of Spexhall, and 
Thomas Goche, clerk, released it to Thomas Duke, son of John Duke, who 
held his first court 8th Aug. 1476. 

On Thomas Duke's death the manor went to his widow Margery, who 
died 29th May, 1529,' and then passed to their son and heir, William Duke, 8 
and from him to his son and heir, George Duke, who held his first court in 
1548, and died in 1551, when it passed to his widow Anne, who held her 



1 Feet of Fines, 14 Edw. I. 36. 
I.P.M., 31 Edw. I. 176. 
M.Q.D., 31 Edw. I. File 44, 



4 Feet of Fines, 9 Edw. II. 34. 
'I.P.M., 21 Hen. VIII. 70. 
6 See Manor of Brosyard, Shadingfield, in 
this Hundred. 



ILKETSHALL. 193 

first court 4th Nov. 1551, and on her death passed to her son and heir, 
Edward Duke, who levied a fine of the manor the 2nd May, 1562,' and died 
in 1598, leaving a son, Ambrose Duke, who died in 1611. From this time 
to the death of Sir Edward Duke, 3rd Bart., without issue, in 1732, the 
manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Benhall, in Plomesgate 
Hundred. It vested like that manor in Edmund Tyrell, Elizabeth Braham, 
Jane Braham, and Arabella Taylor, his nephew and nieces, heirs-at-law, 
and thereupon the said Edmund Tyrell became entitled to all the estates 
devised by a will of his uncle, Sir Edward, subject to the payment of the 
testator's debts and the legacies given by his will. 

Edmund Tyrell was the son of Anne, sister of Sir Edward Duke. He 
sold the manor 28th and 2gth Sept., 1742, to the Rev. Thomas Tanner, 
D.D., rector of the united parishes of St. Edmund the King and St. Nicholas 
Aeons, in the City of London, for 9,957. I2s. 

Thomas Tanner held his first court igth May, 1746, and married Mary, 
daughter of John Potter, Archbishop of Canterbury, who covenanted to 
pay 3,000 dower on the day of marriage as his daughter's portion and 500 
within one month of the birth of her first child. Tanner settled this manor 
upon this lady and her issue, which proved to be an only daughter, Mary 
Elizabeth, who married Richard Mills, of North Elmham. 

Dr. Tanner died in 1786, from which time the manor has passed in 
the same course with the Manor of Redisham Hall, in this Hundred. 

Thomas Goodwyn and Thomas Duke, guardians of Edward Duke, 
son and heir of Ambrose Duke, held their first court i5th April, 1613, and 
Elizabeth Duke, widow and guardian of Edward Duke, held her first court 
22nd April, 1707. 

MANOR OF LIONS. 

This manor belonged to William atte Sleth, and in 1286 was vested in 
the Abbot of West Dereham, in Norfolk. 



'4 Eliz. 19. 
AI 




194 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

METTINGHAM. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Aluric, a freeman 
under Wolsey's commendation, consisting of 60 acres, 3 
bordars, a ploughteam in demesne and i belonging to the 
men (reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey). 
Also enough wood to support 2 hogs, and 3 acres of meadow, 
valued at 8s. (increased by 2s. at the time of the Survey). 
Under Aluric was a holding of eight freemen under com- 
mendation to the said Wolsey, consisting of 20 acres and a ploughteam 
(reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey), valued at 55. Also a 
church with 20 acres, valued at 35. 

At the time of the Survey Warm held this manor of Earl Hugh. 1 

MANOR OF METTINGHAM CASTLE CUM BUNGAY SOCA. 

In the year 1185 William de Norwich held a fee here, and in the time 
of Edw. I. Sir John de Norwich, son of Sir Walter de Norwich, lord of Walpple 
in 1277 was l r d, an d had a grant of free warren in Mettingham, Ship- 
meadow, Redisham, &c. Sir John de Norwich died in 1316, when the 
manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Walter de Norwich, who married 
Katharine Hetherset, and dying in 1326 it passed to his son and heir, Sir 
John de Norwich/ who built Mettingham Castle. He had a licence to 
constellate his residence here in reward for his services in the French wars, 
and the castle was the result. The grant is dated 2ist Aug. 1342, and is 
as follows : 

" Edwardus Dei Era Rer Angl : et Francie et Dominus hiborie omnibs 
Ballivis et fidelius suis ad quos presentes litere previunt salutem. Scaatis 
qd de gracia nostra speciali concessimus et licentiam dedimus gro nobis 
et heredius uris dilecto et fideli uro Johi de Norwico qd ipse mansa manior 
suor de Metyngham in comitatu Sum et Blak-worth et Lyng in com Norm 
muro de petra et cake firmare et kernellare et mansa ilia sic firmata et 
kernellata tenere possit, sibi et hereditis suis in ppetuum sine 
occasione vel impediment uri vel heredum urom vel ministror uror 
quorrinq. In cuius rei testimonium has litteras uras fieri fecimus 
patentes teste me ipo apud Westmonasterium vicesimo primo die 
Augusti Anno regni uri Anglie decimo septimo regni vero uri Francie 
quarto."' ' The form," says Suckling, " adopted by Sir John de Norwich 
for his castle was a parallelogram, of which the north and south sides were 
rather the greatest ; and its area taking in the site of a college of priests, 
afterwards attached to it, included nine acres and a half. Being compelled 
to return to the French wars, the completion of the castle was entrusted 
to the charge of Dame Margaret, his wife, who built the keep, or citadel 
of the fortress, which she placed on the west side of the first court. We 
are indebted to old Leland for this anecdote of her ladyship, who says : 
' Accepi hujus Norwici uxorem antiquiorem castelli partem, co militante, 
construxisse ; hace pars antiquior est in interiori parte domus, nee 
conferenda cum novis aedificiis.' The castle had a massive square tower 
at each angle, but the principal entrance was through the great gate-house 
on the north, which remains tolerably entire. Here may be seen the deep 

1 Dom. ii. 300, 301. 3 Pat. Rolls. 17 Ed. III. pt. ii. 34. 

'See Manor of Dalham, in Risbridge 
Hundred. 



METTINGHAM. 



195 



groove in which the portcullis was worked, and part of the projecting 
barbican, with the entrance to the machicolated gallery above it. There 
is a range of wide windows in the curtain westward of the great entrance 
gate which, though placed high in the wall, bespeaks a total neglect of the 
jealous precaution usually exercised in castellated architecture. They 
are traditionally said to have lighted the great banqueting hall. 

' In 1382 the castle was conveyed, as will be presently shown, to an 
establishment of monks, and became thenceforth rather a monastery than 
a feudal fortress ; and its history furnishes this very remarkable fact, that 
it existed as a castle only forty years from the period of its foundation, and 
remained for about one hundred and sixty in the hands of ecclesiastics. 



sss-e^aa-.--^ ^^n^t^rs^^^^ 

-??**** _ =*ii^_ -^m--^; , E -,i(j.T 




V 



5ft=? 



^-r ^ 



METTINGHAM CASTLE. 



Its latter possessors must have incorporated much of the church militant 
into their observances, to have preserved the fortress in a state of archi- 
tectural integrity. 

" The keep seems to have been converted into the residence of the 
master of the college, as the arms of Richard Shelton, one of the last masters, 
with several matches of his family ornamented the walls of its apartments. 
The arms of Ufford, sab. a cross engrailed or, quartered with Beke gul. a 
cross flory ermine, Brews, and or, a lion ramp, purpure impaling Brews 
were also placed on its walls. 

" At what period the keep fell into decay as a residence is uncertain, 
but it seems, by the following extract from an original letter in the 
possession of Sir Thomas Gage, of Hengrave, that the Lord Keeper Bacon 
resided or visited at Mettingham. Sir Thomas Kitson, writing to Thomas, 
Duke of Norfolk, relates several circumstances which took place : ' With 
my Lord Keeper when I awaited on him with my father-in-law, on Easter 
Wednesday in the morning, at which time we found him newly entered on 
his journey from his house at Redgrave toward Metyngham, and accom- 
panied him about five or six miles on his way.' The castle residence, 
however, went much into neglect soon after this period, because in 1738, 
when Buck published a view of it, dedicated tp Tobias Hunt, Esq., the 



196 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

remains were then not much more extensive than they are at present. 
After Mr. Hunt's decease the habitable part of the castle was occupied for 
many years as a farmhouse, and the ruins converted into barns and farming 
buildings ; till Samuel Safford, Esq., the father of the present possessor, 
pulled down the old house, and erected a new mansion on its site retaining 
an angle of the old keep. 

" The writer was resident as a young man and curate of the parish at 
the time, and saw much of the work of Dame Margaret de Norwich, which 
was then laid open. Several of the interior decorations, long hid, were 
found in excellent preservation the colours and gilding of the arms being 
fresh and brilliant. The discovery of these latter embellishments was the 
more interesting as they are recorded in Ayscough's Catalogue, 1301, 
preserved in the British Museum, which says : ' The arms of Ufford, 
quartering Bee or Beke, are said to be in a parlour in the chapel or college 
of Mettingham, now in the possession of Mr. Henry Denny.' ' 

From the death of Sir John de Norwich in 1362 to the time of Katherine 
Brewse the manor has passed in the same course as the Manor of Dalham, 
in Risbridge Hundred. 

By indenture of lease dated ist July, 5 Rich. II. [1381], Sir John de 
Plays, Robert Howard, Roger de Boys, Knts., Sire Elys de Boyntre, 
parson of Carletone, and Sire John de Waltertone, parson of Harpelee, 
granted the Castle of Mettingham with a wood adjoining for 3 years to 
Sir William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, which castle the lessors had by 
feoff ment of John de Norwich deceased.* 

Katherine de Brews, being at the time of her succeeding to this manor 
or shortly afterwards becoming, a nun, at Dartford, in Kent, she conveyed 
this manor to the college in Mettingham Castle lately removed from 
Raveningham, in Norfolk. The actual grant was made by the trustees 
who then held the property, and the extent of the grant is fully set out in 
the licence in mortmain, which is on the Patent Rolls in 1382. It 
authorises John Plays and others to transfer a chantry to Mettingham Castle, 
and to alienate in mortmain for the same the Castle of Mettingham and 60 
acres of land, 18 of meadow, and 2 of pasture, 4. los. rent in Mettingham 
and Ilketshall, the Manor of Ilketshall, 22 acres of meadow in Barsham, a 
messuage, 160 acres of land, 6 of meadow, 12 of pasture, and 4 of wood, 
and 2os. rent in Shipmeadow, Beccles, Barsham, Ilketshall, and Mettingham, 
three parts of the Manor of Bromfeld, the Manor of Mellis, a messuage, and 
40 acres of land and 2 of meadow, and a mill in Wenhaston. 1 

On the Patent Rolls in 1387 is a grant of Mettingham Castle and all 
the possessions belonging to the Chantry of Mettingham to the church being 
built in the rectory of Norton Soupecors. 4 It does not appear, however, 
that the grant took effect as to the manor or castle of Mettingham, and the 
grant is peculiar in view of the licence five years previously granted to the 
executors of Sir John de Norwich to transfer the college from Norton 
" Lubecourse " to Mettingham. 5 

With the college the manor remained until its surrender, 8th April, 
1542,' to the Crown, and Hen. VIII. granted it the same year to Sir Anthony 

1 Suckling's Hist, of Suff. vol. i. p. 174-175. J 6 Rich. II. ; Suffolk Institute, iv. 83. 

* Harl. 57 C. 41. ' 10 Rep. Hist. Com. pt. v. 460 ; S.P. 1542, 
'Pat. Rolls, 6 Rich. II. pt. i. 35. 243. 

4 Pat. Rolls, II Ric. II. pt. i. 25. 



METTINGHAM. ! 97 

Denny. The grant was of the site of the college, the church, the Manors 
of Mettingham, Bromefeld, and Mellis, and all other possessions of 
Mettingham College, which came to the King by grant of Thomas Bishop, 
of Ipswich, late master. 1 Sir Anthony Denny 2 died 5th Sept. 1549, 3 when 
the manor passed to his son and heir, Henry Denny, who in 1563 sold it to 
Sir Nicholas Bacon, Knt.* The Survey made by John Hille for Sir Nicholas 
Bacon in 1562, just previous to his purchase, will be found amongst the 
Additional MSS. in the British Museum, 5 and is of so interesting a character 
that a transcript is here given : * 

Com. Suff. The viewe and Survey of the manors of Mettingham, 
Ilkensall, and Shippmedowe in the sayde Countye of Suff. there made by 
John Hill sv r ante to the righte honorable S r . Nycholas Bacon, Knight, 
lorde keap of the great Seale the xxth daye of December in the fyfte yeare 
of the reigne of our sovraigne ladye Elizabeth by y e grace of God of England, 
ffrannce, and Ireland, Quene defender of y e faythe &c. Anno 1562 as 
followyth. 

That is to saye 

The descripcon of the mannor. The saide manner of Mettingham is 
scituate in the Northest borders of the Countye of Suff. one mile from 
Bongaye three miles from Beccles m r ket Townes eighte miles from Leystofte 
and 12 myles from yarmouthe haven Townes in a Countrie plenty full of 
wood pasture errable lande and meadowe the nature of the soyle very 
good and holsome to inhabit upon and the said manners extende into the 
Townes and pishes of mettingham St. Johns of Ilkensatt St. Margaretts 
St. Andrewes St. Agnes St. Laurence Bongaye Becles and Elloughe and the 
woods growing within the sayde manners are solde at highe prises because 
y e same maye be conveyed to London by waiter for there cometh within 
one myle and a halfe of the Castell y e Ryver runynge from Becles w ch wyll 
beare a kele or barge of xx" tunne. The woods are pte coppes & pte 
tymber. W ch are for y e moste parte standinge within one myle & a 
halfe of y e water verie mete to be conveyed to London or to any other parte 
of the Realme by Water as well for fyre wood as for tymber and are ptelye 
replenyshed withe ashe which is very muche desired of coopers to make 
barrells for y e costes of Suff. & Norff . in herringe tyme. 

The gatehouse and other decaied lodgings. The Scyte of the Castell 
standyth at the Southest corner of the cofnen called Mettingham grene 
inclosed rounde aboute withe a mote and a fayer stone wall conteyninge 
in height xxx" foote and in thickness three foote but decayed in some 
places. And at thintre into the same standithe a gate house well and 
stronglye bylded the walles of stone, and above over the gate a fayer Chamber 
with a chymney nowe decayed by reason of the taking of the leade whiche 
covered the same where before the leade was taken awaye over the same 
chamber was a fayer tower where was a goodlye pspecte to view Townes and 
villages there aboutes and also moste pte of the demeanes of the same mannor 
were within the view of the same. And the Gatehouse containeth in 
length xxii" foote and in bredthe xvij foote but will decaye out of hande 
if it be not shortleye covered. And adioyninge on the est syde of the 
said gate house are dyvers lodgings as well above as benethe for the Porter 

'S.P. 1542, 283 (43). 6 This transcript is taken from the copy 

* See Manor of Ilketshall, in this Hundred. given in vol. xi. p. 315 of the Pro- 

3 1. P.M., 4 Edw. VI. 105. ceedings of the Suffolk Institute, 

Fine, Hil. 5 Eliz. and not from the MS. itself. 
'Add. 14850. 



198 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

and lodgings for sv*nts whereof remayneth onlye the walles of stone, the 
tymber and coveringe whereof are utterly decayed. 

The Courte. And within the gate house is a fayer large base courte 
conteyning in length two hundred fytie eighte foote, and in bredth, one 
hundred fiftie two foote inclosed on thest North and West withe the Stone 
wall and on y e South withe y* buyldings and lodgings of the mansyon house. 

The Porche and the Chamber above it. And on the South syde of the 
Courte ys a fayer Porche ledinge into the hall conteyninge in length xiij 
foote and in bredth viij foote withe a Chamber over the same wherein is a 
chymney and a wyndowe openinge into the Courte well glased the walles 
of stone and covered with leade. 

The hall. And within the porch is a fayer large hall withe an open 
roof covered withe tyle conteyninge in length xlvj foote and in breadth 
xxx foote wherein is a chymney on the north syde, the Walles of stone with 
one yle on evy syde covered withe leade conteyninge in length xlvi foote 
and in breadth vi foote with vii spouts of leade to the same yles and gutters 
of leade descending from the toppe of the hall into the same spouts the 
flower of the same hall well paved with bricke. 

The p'lour. And at the ende of the hall is a verie fayer plour con- 
teyninge in length xxv" foote and in breadth xviij foote withe a large 
chymney on the est syde and a fayer baye wyndowe of stone glased openinge 
at the South ende into a lyttle Court which adioyneth to the mote inclose 
on the southc syde withe a stone walle betwene the Courte and the mote. 
And the plour ys verie fayer seled with waynescott carved with knoppes 
fayer gilte hanginge downe and withe two fayer benches of waynescott 
and the flower borded with oke. And the armes of the last master of 
Colledge, rounde about the same parlour fayer gilte. 

The p'lour chamber. And over the same parlour is a fayer chamber 
called the plour chamber conteyning in length xxv foote and in breadth 
xviii foote with a fayer chimney and but little decayed the wyndowe whereof 
is well glased and openeth towards the South into the forsaid Courte. 

The vestry and ye vestry e chamber. And adioyning to the plour on thest 
syde ys a Chamber somtyme called the vestrie Chamber withe two Chambers 
above yt adioynge to the vestrie whiche are uncovered and sore decayed 
and the vestrie adioyninge to the same ys utterly decayed. 

The pantrie.And at the nether ende of the hall on the south syde ys 
the pantry seled cont in length xviij foote and in breadth xij foote the 
walles of stone cov r ed with tyle. 

The buttrie. And at the nether ende of the hall on the northe syde 
nere the hall dore is the buttrye seled and paved with stone conteyninge 
in length xx" foote and in breadth xviii foote the walles of stone. 

The larder. And adioyninge to the buttrie at the Weste ende is the 
larder conteyninge in length xij foote and in breadth viij foote the walles 
of stone. 

The wine cellar. And next unto that on the Weste Ende is the Wyne 
celler whiche hath byn used for Wyne but in my opynyon not mete for that 
purpose, because it is verie little it conteyneth in length x foote and in 
breadthe viij foote. 

The lodginges over the buttrie Pantrie Wyne celler and larder. - And at 
the hall door is a payer of stayers leading up into an olde decayed Gallery 



METTINGHAM. 199 

where on the southe syde of the same over the pantrey buttrey larder and 
wyne celler is a storye Whearein are vij chambers ptlely decayed. Whereof 
fower have chimneys and two houses of office, and somtyme weare called 
the Gestes Chambers and s*ved to laye Strangers in And on the southe syde 
of the same ys a payer of stayers descendinge downe into the little Courte 
that adioyneth to the mote covered with leade on the toppe conteyninge 
in length iiij foote di and in breathe iij foote. 

The entrie. And at the nether ende of the hall is a fayer entrie con- 
teyninge in length Iiij foote and in breadthe x foote. 

The Kytchyn, boy ling house and their e necessarie chambers. And at 
the nether ende of the entrie is a Chamber withe a Chimney, whiche belkye 
s'ved for the Clarke of the Kytchyn, and adioyning to that is the Kitchyn 
whearein ys one raunge, and the Kytchyn conteyneth in length xxx foote, 
and in breadth xxvi foote and above that ys a little chamber over the 
boylinge house at the West end, whiche belyke was for lodginges for the 
cookes. And next the Kytchyn is the boylinge house at the West ende 
conteyninge in length xxiiij foote and in breadth xij foote wythe a chymney 
in yt partelye decayed. All whiche sayde houses weare covered withe 
leade, butt nowe are uncovered wherebye they are greately decayed. 

The bakehouse yard. And at the West end of the Kytchin is the bake- 
house yarde conteyninge in lengthe one hundred and eighte foote and in 
breadth xxxij foote and on the South was the slaughter house and other 
offices lately pulled down. 

The bakehouse, brewhouse, and maltinge house. And at the Weste end 
of that is the bakehouse, brewhouse, and maltinge house, but are decayed 
because theye were covered withe leade, and are now uncovered which is 
thonly cause of theire decaye and there are neyther leads nor brewinge 
vessels. 

The storehouse. And on the northe side of the sayd bakehouse-yard 
ys a house called the store house conteyning in lengthe xxxvj and in breadthe 
xviij foote, the flower plannched with oke and in it a chamber to laye apples 
in the roofe covered withe tyle. 

Cynnyhalle withe a buttrie and one chamber. One fayer house adioynge 
to the store house at the North ende conteyninge in length xxij foote and 
in breadth xviij foote called Cynnye halle with a chymney and the wyn- 
dowes well glased withe a lyttle buttrey and one other chamber adjoyinge 
at the West ende. 

The lodgings over Cynny halle and the malte chamb' . And ov r the same 
halle and buttrie ys a storye whearein are two chambers whereof one hathe 
a chymney and a house of office. And adjoining to them at ye West ende 
is a chamber to laye malte in withe a payer of stayers descending into y e 
malte house. 

The Stable. The Stable incloseth parte of the northe syde of the Court 
and adjoyneth to the gate-house verie large conteyninge in length Ixxvj 
foote and in breadth xxvj foote and it fawted x for above it was a fayer 
rome to laye in haye but is decayed because the coveringe of leade is taken 
awaye, and the raigne cominge in hathe rotted the plankes and there 
remayneth nothinge, but the walls of stone and the rafter that beare up 
the leade are taken awaye and solde. 



200 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The oldt castell.' The olde castell inclosed withe a mote by it selfe, 
from the mansyon house con in length fowcr score foote, and in breadthe 
fyftie foot, but that ys utterlye decayed and dyvers of the walles fallen 
downe, but there remaineth yet a fayer chymney of freestone standinge 
withe two great barres of Iron holdinge up parte of it. 

The Inner ortyarde. Thinner Ortyarde on the South syde of the 
Colledge inclosed withe the mote conteyneth in it five roods sett withe dyvers 
trees of fruite and devided into sondrye partes with quicksett hedges and 
quicke hedges of boxe where hathe byn manye fayer Arbors and many 
small gardens and wolde be agayne if it were well kepte and hathe fower 
little pondes in it called fridaye pondes. Wherein is small store of fyshe 
or none but they s r yed to p r sve fishe taken on ye weke dayes tyll fridaye. 

The greate Orteyarde. The greate Orteyarde at the West end of the 
Colledge thre parte inclosed withe thutter mote and the Sothende withe a 
pece of grounde called the Bowlinge Alley with a fayre ponde in the northe 
ende wythe some fyshe in yt but small store which are breames and perche. 
And it ys verie full and thicke sett withe fruite trees of all kinds for pears 
apples wardens plumes and such other and it conteyneth one acre and thre 
roods. 

The mote. Within the mote are roche, breame, trenche, and perche, 
but small store because it is not well keapte, nor looked to, for the fish are 
sore distroyed with an otter and with some pickerell, which are in the same 
and hathe not been stored of a great time but hathe been taken very much 
with bow netts but if it weare scowered and well stored and kept it would 
be verie good for all kindes of fishe. 

Demesne lands. The scite of the Castle or College of Mettingham, with 
the houses, offices, ponds, orchards, gardens, and a small park, called the 
Kitchen park, contains 28 acres 3 roods. Value of an acre, 55. p. Ann. 

Sir Nicholas Bacon died in 1579, and from this time to the time of 
Sir Edmund Bacon, 4th Bart., the manor passed in the same course as the 
Manor of Hinderclay, in Blackbourn Hundred. From Sir Edmund Bacon 
the manor was purchased in 1675 by John Hunt. Sir Edmund Bacon, in 
the deed of conveyance, is described as " Sir Edmund Bacon, Bart., 
son and heir of Robert Bacon, Esq., deceased, the late eldest son and heir- 
apparent of Sir Robert Bacon, Bart., deceased, who was the brother and 
next heir of Sir Edmund Bacon, late of Redgrave, Knt. and Bart., 
deceased." John Hunt, the purchaser, was first of Cambridge and after- 
wards of Walsham le Willows. He married Elizabeth, to whom by his will 
dated in 1681 he devised this manor and the Manor of Ilketshall St. Andrews 
for life, with remainder to his son, John Hunt, in fee. John Hunt the 
father was buried at Walsham, and on his widow Elizabeth's death, in 
Aug. 1696, the manor passed to her son John. He lived at Walsham Hall, 
and married Mary, daughter of the Rev. Tobias Blosse, of Belstead, clerk. 
On this marriage the manor was settled on the issue in tail, but on the 
father's making over to his eldest son John some estates in Mendlesham 
and Cotton, the portion brought by his mother, the son joined the father 
and suffered a recovery of the Mettingham estate, and limited the same to 
the use of the father for life, with remainder to the use of Tobias Hunt, the 
2nd son, for life, with remainder as the father should by deed or will appoint, 
with remainder to his own right heirs. On the marriage of Tobias Hunt 

' Permission to crenellate or fortify his manor house at Mettingham was granted 
to John de Norwich, 17 Ed. III. 



METTINGHAM. 201 

with Elizabeth Knight, who was a minor, the father settled this estate 
(subject to his own life interest) to uses for the benefit of his son, the said 
Tobias, and his intended wife and their issue, subject to a proviso that in 
case Elizabeth Knight should not on coming of age settle certain property 
belonging to her to certain uses, then the settlement so made by John Hunt 
should be void. 

Tobias Hunt and his wife not complying with the condition, the estate 
was, under the direction of the Court of Chancery, reconveyed to the former 
uses, and accordingly John Hunt, by his will dated 25th Sept. 1721, devised 
all his manors of Mettingham Castle and Bungay Soca and Ilketshall St. 
Andrews to the said Tobias his son for life, with remainder to his (testator's) 
daughter Elizabeth Hunt in tail, with remainder to his own right 
heirs. John Hunt's eldest son John, who resided at Bentley, married one 
Jane (subsequently married to John Goodall),and died in 1709 in his father's 
lifetime. John Hunt the father died, and was buried at Walsham in 1726, 
when the manor passed to his son, Tobias Hunt, who resided at the castle, 
and died in 1741 without issue, when the manor vested in Elizabeth Hunt, 
his sister, who resided at Walsham Hall, of which she was proprietor under 
the will of her father, and on her death, unmarried, in 1757, the manor 
descended and came to John Hunt, son and heir of John Hunt, her elder 
brother, deceased, who was, as we have said, eldest son of John Hunt her 
father. This John Hunt the nephew had been an apothecary of some 
eminence at Framlingham, and came to reside at Ditchingham Lodge, 
where he kept a pack of hounds, and lived in great hospitality. He married 
Dorothy Canham, and died without issue in 1763. By his will, dated 
I7th Aug. 1763,' he devised his estates at Mettingham, &c., to his nephew, 
Burham Cutting, and the Rev. James Safford, vicar of Mettingham, and 
their heirs as tenants in common. 

Burham Cutting was the son of Burham Cutting and Mary his wife, 
sister of John Hunt the testator, and James Safford was the son of James 
Safford, of Ipswich, and of Grace his wife, the other sister of John Hunt. 
The Rev. James Safford, by a settlement dated 24th Nov. 1770, on his 
marriage with Kitty Baines or Baynes, settled his moiety of the manor 
upon himself for life, then on his wife for life, and then on his children, 
with remainder to himself in fee. Having no issue he, by his will, dated 
2ist Feb. 1800, left his moiety of the manor, subject to his widow's interest, 
to his nephew, Samuel Safford, in fee. James Safford's will was proved in 
the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, 25th Feb. 1805. Samuel was the son 
of John Safford, of Bungay, brother of James, and married Mary Cole, and 
after divers mesne conveyances, by an indenture dated 3rd June, 1826, 
made between Matthew Brettingham Kingbury and James Taylor Mar- 
gitson of the first part, John Carter Parkinson, Richard Brettingham, 
Robert Williams Morris, and Robert Smith of the second part, Charles 
Day of the third part, and John Day of the fourth part, this moiety of the 
manor became vested in the said Charles Day. 

Under the will of Burham Cutting, dated 23rd Sept. 1791,* and certain 
indentures dated loth and nth June, 1825, the release made between 
Kitty Safford of the first part, James Cutting Safford (son of the said Samuel 
Safford), of the second part, Joseph Warner Bromley of the third part, and 
Simon Batley Jackaman of the fourth part, the moiety devised to Burham 
Cutting was assured to the use of Kitty Safford (widow of James) for life, 

1 Proved at Norwich, I3th Sept. 1763. * Proved P.C.C. 1792. 

BI 



202 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

with remainder to son of the said James Cutting Safford in fee. By deed 
dated Qth Oct. 1827, made between the said Charles Day of the first part, 
the said James Cutting Safford and Louisa his wife, daughter of the Rev. 
James Chartres, D.D., of the second part, the Rev. William Boultbee Sleath 
and Edward Morgan of the third part, a partition was effected between 
Charles Day and James Cutting Safford, this manor being allotted to the 
use of the said James Cutting Safford for life, then to the use that his widow 
Louisa should receive a jointure of 200 a year, and subject thereto to the 
use of James Cutting Safford in fee. On the nth Oct. 1827, J- C. Safford 
mortgaged the manor for a term of 1,000 years to William B. Sleath and 
John Sweeting for 5,400. By deed dated 25th April, 1864, and made 
between E. Morgan of the first part, J. C. Safford and Louisa his wife of 
the second part, John Fell and the Rev. Joseph Power of the third part, 
and the said J. C. Safford of the fourth part, the manor was released to the 
said J. C. Safford in fee free from the mortgage and the 200 jointure of 
his wife. J. C. Safford resided at the castle, and by his will, dated 3rd 
Feb. 1868, appointed his wife Louisa, the Rev. John Yelloly, rector of 
Barsham, Frederick Lawrence Sleath Safford, of Hadleigh, and the Rev. 
William Peckham Goode, rector of Earsham, in Norfolk, executors and 
trustees, and devised the manor to the use of his wife for life, and after her 
death to the use of his trustees upon trust for sale. The testator died 2nd 
August, 1871, and his will, with a codicil, was proved at Ipswich 30th Sept. 
following. 

Louisa Safford died 27th Jan. 1876, and by an indenture dated gth 
August following, J. C. Safford's trustees sold the manor to Charles Henry 
Capon, of Norwich, auctioneer, for 1,400. From him the manor seems to 
have passed to Charles F. Hope Collison, and a little later was acquired by 
Henry Rushner Upton, who by deed dated 22nd September, 1885, sold to 
Matthew Sallitt Emerson, who 2ist March, 1887, sold to Joseph Beaumont, 
on whose death i8th July, 1889, the manor passed to George Frederick 
Beaumont, of the Lawn, Coggeshall, Essex, in whom the same is still vested. 

A fine was levied of this manor, and also of the Manors of Ilketshall 
and Shipmeadow, by Sir Robert Catlyn and others against Sir Nicholas 
Bacon in 1566, no doubt on the occasion of some settlement by Sir Nicholas. 

An extent of the Manor of Mettingham in 1485 will be found amongst 
the Stowe MSS. in the British Museum.' 

No particular custom of descent prevails in this manor, so that the 
common law operates. There is no admission of widows to Freebench 
or of husbands by the curtesy. Entails were barred by customary recoveries. 
All timber and other trees growing on copyholds and waste lands appear 
to belong to the lord. 

Arms of METTINGHAM : Or, a chevron, partee per pale Or and Gules 
couped ; between three mullets Sable. Of HUNT : Az. on a bend between 
2 water bougets Or 3 leopards' faces Gu. 



1 Stowe 934. 



REDISHAM. 



203 



REDISHAM. 

(HERE was one manor in this place in Saxon times held by 
Godwin, a freeman under Stigand's commendation, con- 
sisting of 60 acres, 2 villeins, 2 bordars, a ploughteam in 
demesne and half belonging to the men ; also enough wood 
to support 4 hogs. The value was ios., but later it increased 
to 405., and at the time of the Survey rendering 305., 
when it was held by Robert de Curcun of Roger Bigot. 
A freeman under Godwin had formerly a holding of 4 acres, valued at 8^.' 




REDISHAM HALL MANOR IN REDISHAM PARVA. 

In 1206 this was the lordship of Hugo de Berry, and in 1338 it was 
vested in Walter de Hales, who this year conveyed it to Edmund 
de Redisham and Alice his wife. 1 

The Redishams had lands here at a much earlier period, and in 1267 
Walter Redisham had a grant of free warren here, and in Upredesham, 
Stanfield, Weston, and Ringsfield. 3 He was at this time lord of Redisham 
Parva Manor. 

In 1339 Edmund de Redisham amd Alice his wife held the manor. 
In 1390 the manor was granted by Robert Francis, of Shaddingfield, and 
Robert Bercham, of Brampton, to Robert Garneys, of Heveningham, and 
by letters dated 18 Rich. II. [1395], John Skype, of Ryngeffelde quit claim 
to Robert - - (probably Garneys), of Beccles, all his right in the manor 
" quondam Edmundi de Redesham." 4 Peter Garneys, son of the above 
Robert Garneys, was enfeoffed of the manor in 1407, and in the same year 
Robert Garneys and Katharine his wife, daughter and coheir of John 
Blanchard, of Huntingfield, settled it on William their son. This William 
Garneys married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Ralph Bigot, Knt., of Stockton, 
and by will dated I3th Feb. 1420,' gave the manor, after his wife's death 
to his son, Ralph Garneys, who held his first court I4th Jan. 1443-4. 

Amongst the Cotton Charters in the British Museum is a demise dated 
30th Nov. 14 Hen. VI. [1435], from Sir William Philip and John Fastolf, 
Knt., Oliver Gross, John Bacon, Robert Rous, Robert Reve, clerks, and 
William Cole to this Ralph Garneys, described as Ralph, son of William 
Garneys, of this manor, with other manors, including those of Barsham 
and Weston, except a piece of marsh land in Worlingham called le Park, 
in tail to him and his right heirs, with remainder to Peter Garneys, uncle 
of the grantee, and his right heirs, failing which to the right heirs of the said 
William Garneys. 6 There is amongst the same Charters a power of 
attorney for Sir William Philip and John Fastolf, Knts., and others, to 
John Vernoun and John Honyngham, clerk, to give seisin accordingly/ 

The following year we find amongst the Harleian Charters letters of 
the said Ralph Garneys appointing William Bonde and Robert Ludlowe 
to deliver seisin of the manor to Sir Thomas Kerdestone and John Heven- 
yngham, Knts., William Pastone, John Berney de Redham, and eight others 



'Dom. ii. 336. 

3 Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. III. 23. 
3 Chart. Rolls, 51 Hen. III. 6. 
Add. Ch. 15752. 



5 The will was proved the 6th April, 1425. 
Reg. Hurning. Norw. pt. ii. fol. 136. 
6 Cott. Ch. v. 3. 
7 Cott. Ch. v. 22. 



204 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of the manor. The date is aoth June, 14 Hen. VI. [1436]' and the following 
year by deed of the aforesaid Sir Thomas Kerdestone and John Hevenyng- 
ham, William Pastone " Justiciarius," demise the manor to the said Ralph 
Garneys. This is dated 22nd July, 15 Hen. VI. [i437j-* Amongst the 
Early Chancery Proceedings is an action by this Ralph Garneys, described 
as son and heir of William Garneys and of Elizabeth his wife, against 
Piers (Peter) Garneys, " uncle of the said Ralph," relating to the manor. 1 
Ralph Garneys died in 1450* without issue of his body, whereon the manor 
passed to his uncle, Peter Garneys, 3 of Beccles. 

By his will dated 20th August, 1450, proved 5th Feb. 1451, he devised 
the manor to his son, Thomas Garneys, on whose death this manor passed 
to his son, John Garneys. John held his first court 6th March, 1474-5, 
and he and his wife were deforciants in a fine levied of this manor and other 
manors in 1517 by Sir Edmund Jenny and others, no doubt with the object 
of a resettlement of the property. 6 John Garneys died in 1524, but in 
1482 William Pykenham, Sir John Sulyard, serjeant-at-law, and other 
feoffees of John Garneys and Elizabeth his wife, held their first court, as 
in 1524 Sir W 7 illiam Rous, Knt., George Waldegrave, Lionel Talmach, 
Edward Polet and others, feoffees of Elizabeth Garneys, the widow of John 
Garneys, held their first court. Elizabeth Garneys died in 1539, when she 
was succeeded by her son and heir, Robert Garneys, who held his first court 
this year, and died in 1556, when the manor passed to his grandson and 
heir, Thomas Garneys, of Roos Hall and Kenton, son of John Garneys, 
of Kenton, who died in 'his father's lifetime. Thomas Garneys levied a 
fine of this manor nth Nov. 1560, and died in 1566, when the manor went 
to his brother and next male heir, Nicholas Garneys, who held his first 
court I3th April, 1568. 

Amongst the Tanner MSS. in the Bodleian is a copy of a deed between 
this Nicholas Garneys and Charles Clere relating to this manor in 1570. 7 

Nicholas Garneys was High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1592, and built 
Redisham Hall, now pulled down. At Ringsfield is a handsome monument 
to his memory. This manor was devised to his 5th son Nicholas, who 
married Mary Freston, and against him a fine was levied of the manor in 
1601 by Robert Purdye and others. 8 Nicholas Garneys the younger 
having no issue, he devised the manor to Frances Elizabeth, daughter 
of his brother, Edward Garneys, who had also married a Freston. Edward 
Garneys, however, had the manor, for he held a first court for it 2Oth Oct. 
1637, as did Nicholas Garneys, i6th Sept. 1653, and Clare Garneys, widow, 
3ist May, 1677. 

By indentures of lease and release dated 3Oth and 3ist July, 1700, 
Frances Garneys, then Frances Jacob, of Beccles, widow, conveyed her 
moiety of the Manor of Redisham, called on the rolls " Little Redisham," 
to Sir John Duke, Bart., 9 for 1,204. ys. 6d., and by a like transfer bearing 
date 3rd and 4th January, 1706, George Pretyman, of Bacton, and George 
Pretyman, his eldest son and heir by Elizabeth his late wife, daughter of 

'Harl. 50 F. 37. 'Fine, Easter, 9 Hen. VIII. 

*Harl. 50 F. 39. 7 Tanner, cccxiii. 180. 

'E.C.P. Bundle 71, 82. "Fine, Trin. 43 Eliz. 

4 1. P.M., t. Hen. VI. c. 42. 'He held a first court 25th Nov. 1700, and 

J For particulars of the alliances of these his widow Eliza, 2ist June, 1709. 

Garneys, see Kenton Manor, in Sir John's will is dated I7th July, 

Loes Hundred.- 1705, proved P.C.C. gth Nov. 1705. 



REDISHAM. 205 

Edward Garneys, and niece of Nicholas Garneys, conveyed the other moiety 
to Sir Edward Duke, the son of Sir John Duke. A settlement was made 
on the marriage of Sir Edward Duke by indentures dated the tyth and i8th 
Aug. 1715, to which Dame Elizabeth Duke was party. It was in con- 
sideration of 12,000 paid to Sir Edward. The manor was settled to the 
use of Sir Edward for life, then to the use (after a limitation to trustees) 
of Mary Rudge, the intended wife for life for jointure with remainder over 
in tail male. 

Sir Edward Duke ultimately having the whole, devised the manor by 
his will dated gth Aug. 1732, and codicil dated i5th Aug. 1732,' to his 
nephew, Edmund Tyrell, of Gipping, who sold the same to the Rev. Thomas 
Tanner, D.D., rector of the united parishes of St. Edmund the King and 
St. Nicholas Aeons, in the City of London, by deeds dated 28th and 2Qth 
Sept. 1742. A fine was levied Michaelmas Term, 17 Geo. II. Thomas 
Tanner married Mary, daughter of John Potter, Archbishop of Canterbury, 
and settled the manor by deeds dated I4th and I5th Jan. 1742, on himself 
for life, remainder to said Mary Potter for life, with remainder to such uses 
as Thomas Tanner might by deed or will appoint in favour of children, 
with remainder in tail male. Mary the wife died in the lifetime of her 
husband, leaving an only daughter, Mary Elizabeth, afterwards married to 
Richard Milles, who in her right became lord and held a court I3th Oct. 
1795. Dr. Tanner died in 1786, having by his will dated 1 7th Oct. 1785, 
devised to his " much esteemed " son-in-law, Richard 'Milles, Esq., all his 
manors and lordships, and all and every his messuages, lands, and tithes, &c. 
in the counties of Suffolk, and Norfolk, and Kent, or elsewhere in the Kingdom 
of Great Britain, to hold the same for his life, and after his decease he devised 
the same unto Mary Elizabeth Milles, wife of the said Richard Milles, 
provided she should survive her said husband, the same to be disposed as 
she should by deed or will direct, limit, devise, or appoint. The will was 
proved in the Prerogative Court of Canterbury 30th March, 1786. They 
sold the same with the Manors of Ilketshall, Elyses, and Statton 7th Oct. 
1808, to John Garden, of the City of Westminster, on whose death they 
passed to his son and heir, John Garden. 

In 1885 the manor belonged to John Lewis Garden, who died in 1892, 
when the manor passed to his trustees, and later to his daughter and coheir, 
Miss Garden and Mr. Bernard Wilson, who in 1903 sold the same to Thomas 
De la Garde Grissell, of Redisham Hall. 

Redisham Hall, which was demolished about 1820 to make way for 
the new mansion of John Garden, had been built by Nicholas Garneys during 
the reign of Elizabeth, and was a fine old mansion. Suckling says of it : 
' It contained some good and lofty apartments and was rich in the clustered 
ornamented chimneys which so especially marked the domestic architecture 
of the era in which it was erected. The excellency of its masonry was 
proved at the time of its destruction, when many parts of the walls fell in 
large masses ; the tenacity of the mortar, in several cases, resisting all 
attempts to separate the brickwork. A remarkable instance of the slow 
but sure destruction wrought by ivy on the buildings to which it attaches 
itself was manifested here. A solid gable had afforded access by some 
narrow unseen aperture to the tender shoots of this insidious plant, which 
gradually expanded till the wall was rent from top to bottom, and at length 
presented a chink wide enough to admit the arm of a full-grown man.'" 

Arms of REDISHAM : Arg. semee de lis (13) Gu. 

'Proved P.C.C. 23rd Oct. 1732. 'Suckling, Hist, of Suff. vol. i. p. 66. 



206 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 
MANOR OF REDISHAM PARVA. 



As we have mentioned, Walter, son of William de Redisham, 1 held 
this manor in 1267, in which year he had a grant of free warren. 1 

On the Patent Rolls in 1276 we find a commission issued to enquire as 
to the person who came to Redisham Manor belonging to Walter de 
Redesham and carried away his goods during his absence in Ireland. 3 

Walter de Redesham died in 1293.* In 1316 Roesia de Redisham 
was lady of the manor, though Suckling states she held as early as the gth 
Edw. I. 

Soon afterwards the manor passed to Sir John de Norwich, who in 
1357 had a grant of free warren here. 5 From him the manor passed in 
the same course as the Manors of Mettingham Castle, in this Hundred, 
and of Dalham, in Risbridge Hundred, to Katherine de Brews, who released 
to John Play, Sir Robert Howard, Knt., and others, all her right in this 
manor, which was settled on the college in Mettingham Castle, where it 
remained till the dissolution of that religious establishment. The manor 
is included in the inquis. p.m. of Margaret de Norwich, who died in 1366,' 
and of Sir John de Norwich in 1374. 7 

Davy says nothing about this manor vesting in the college, but states 
that in 1394 William March, of Sotterley, William Barham, of Beccles, and 
Thomas Joy, of Denham, conveyed the manor to William Phelip, Robert 
Garneys, and other feoffe.es. 

In 1479 the manor possibly belonged to Thomas Playters, as he in that 
year died seised of 200 acres in Redesham Parva, Weston, Ilketshall, 
Brampton, Shadingfield, and Westwall,' and a little later we find it vested 
in William Playters, 9 who died 25th Dec. 1516.' He was lord at the time 
of his decease, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Christopher 
Playters, who died in 1547. 

Christopher seems, however, in his lifetime to have parted with this 
manor, for a fine was in 1535 levied against him and others of this manor 
by Robert Pettiwode and others. We find that William Rede, citizen and 
mercer of London, died seised of it loth Feb. 1542, when it passed to his 
son and heir, William Rede, afterwards Sir William Rede." The manor 
was then stated to be held of the King as of his Hundred of Wangford, 
and valued at 12. 135. qd. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth is 
an action by William Rede against William Berney relating to Redisham 
and Shadingfield." 



'H.R. ii. 179. 

Chart. Rolls, 5 Hen. III. 6. 
J Pat. Rolls, 4 Edw. I. 5^. 
4 I.P.M. 20 Edw. I. 98. 
'Chart. Rolls, 31 Edw. III. 2. 
I.P.M., 40 Edw. III. 20. 
M.P.M. 48 Edw. III. 52. 



I.P.M., 19 Edw. IV. 62. 

'See Manor of Uggeshall, in Blything 

Hundred. 

IO I.P.M., 9 Hen. VIII. 84. 
" See Manor of Wathe Hall, North Cove, in 

this Hundred. 
" C.P. ser. ii. B. clvi. 73. 




RINGSFIELD. 207 

RINGSFIELD. 

MONG the lands of the King kept by Roger Bigot was a 
manor in this place, held by a freeman under the Confessor 
at the time of the Survey. It consisted of ij carucates of 
land, a villein, 5 bordars, a ploughteam in demesne and i 
belonging to the men, also 2 acres of meadow, wood sufficient 
to support 20 hogs, and half a mill. Also a church with 15 
acres valued at 2s. Sd., 2 ploughteams, 2 beasts, 5 hogs, 
30 sheep, and 16 goats. The value was 205. (decreased to i6s. at the 
time of the Survey). In the same- township was an estate of n freemen 
under Wolsey's commendation in the time of the Confessor, consisting of a 
carucate of land, 4 ploughteams (reduced to a team and a half at the time 
of the Survey), and 2 acres of meadow. The Survey goes on to say : "80 
and 3 freemen out of this Hundred were added to Montfort's manor in King 
William's time, among whom are the aforesaid 12, who rendered no custom 
at all to this manor in King Edward's time ; but now they render 15 pounds ; 
and this custom Aluric the provost appointed for them in Roger Bigot's 
time." 1 

Among the same lands the Survey states that the King had part of a 
church at the time of the Survey with 20 acres, others having part therein, 
valued at 35.* 

Another holding in this place was that of two freemen under Burchard's 
commendation, consisting of 12 acres, a bordar, half a ploughteam, and wood 
to maintain 2 hogs, valued at 35. 6d. At the time of the Survey this was 
held by Warin, son of Burn win, of Earl Hugh. 3 

The last estate mentioned was that of eight freemen under Leustan's 
commendation (except two, one being under Ulchetel's commendation 
and the other under commendation of Wolsey, of Mutford.) It consisted 
of 76 acres, 2 ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), wood 
enough to maintain 6 hogs, and an acre of meadow, valued at IDS. At the 
time of the Survey this estate belonged to Roger Bigot, and was worth 175.* 

RINGSFIELD MANOR. 

In 1263 the lordship was held by Henry de Vallibus, who this year 
had a grant of free warren here. 5 

The manor was subsequently held by William de Vallibus, and in 1280 
by his son and heir, Sir John de Vallibus. 6 

In 1314 the family of Roos of Roos Hall held the Manor of Ringsfield. 
In the i6th century the manor was held by the family of Blyant, and John 
Blyant died seised of it 8th March, 15237 when it passed to his son and 
heir, Richard Blyant. 8 

The manor was acquired in 1808 by John Garden, and has since 
devolved in the same course as Redisham Hall Manor, in this Hundred. 

Dom. ii. 2826; 'See Manor of Barsham, in this Hundred, 

2 Dom. Ib. and the Manor of Wissett, in 

3Dom. ii. 301. Blything Hundred. 

4 Dom. ii. 335. 7 1.P.M., 14 Hen. VIII. 107. 

'Chart. Rolls, 48 Hen. III. i. "See Manor of Ringshall.in Bosmere and 

Claydon Hundred, and Manor of 
Campines, in Cotton Hempnall, 
Hartismere Hundred. 



208 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Suckling stated that in his day it was considered little more than a reputed 
manor, as no courts were held, the copyholds having merged into the hands 
of the lord or become emancipated. 1 

Page, however, writing but one year later than Suckling, states that 
the manor then belonged to Charles Day ; however, Page is clearly wrong, 
and the manor (if existing) has to the present day passed as the Manor of 
Redisham Hall. 



'Suckling, Hist, of Suff. vol. i. p. 68. 




SHADINGFIELD. 209 

SHADINGFIELD. 

HERE were five manors held in this place in Saxon times. 
The first was held by a freeman under Stigand's commenda- 
tion, consisting of 30 acres, 4 bordars, always one ploughteam 
and half a ploughteam belonging to the bordars. Also enough 
wood to maintain 6 hogs, and an acre of meadow, valued at 
ios. At the time of the Survey this manor belonged to Stigand, 
and was kept in the King's hands by William de Noers. 1 
The second manor was held by Godwin, son of Tuka, under Gurth's 
commendation, and at the time of the Survey by him of Roger Bigot, 
consisting of a carucate of land, 5 bordars, 3 serfs, a ploughteam in demesne 
(changed to i teams at the time of the Survey) and i belonging to the men. 
Also enough wood to support 12 hogs, an acre of meadow, a rouncy, and 20 
sheep. The value was formerly ios., but was doubled at the time of the 
Survey. It was a league long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt 

Roger Bigot also possessed here a small estate of 8 acres valued with 
Briges. It was formerly held by a freeman under Wolsey's commendation. 3 

The next three manors were held at the time of the Survey by Geoffrey 
de Magnaville. One was formerly held by Haldein, a freeman under 
Harold's commendation, consisting of a carucate of land, a villein, 10 
bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne and i belonging to the men. Also 4 
acres of meadow, enough wood to support 20 hogs, a rouncy, n hogs, 80 
sheep, and 2 hives of bees, valued at ios., which value was doubled at the 
time of the Survey. 4 The second was formerly held by a freeman under 
Bishop Stigand's commendation, consisting of a carucate of land, a villein, 
5 bordars (reduced by i at the time of the Survey), a ploughteam in demesne 
and 2 belonging to the men (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), the 
value being 2OS. The Survey says : ' This man was . . . and 
seized to the use of the King ; and later Walerman seized him : and gave 
security thereupon." The third manor was formerly held by two freemen 
under commendation to Haldein, and consisted of 32^ acres and half a 
ploughteam, valued at 55. 8dT. 5 

The last estate mentioned in this place was that of Ralph Baignard, 
formerly that of Toredi, a freeman, consisting of 20 acres of land and a 
ploughteam (which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), valued at 

MANOR OF BROSYARD WITH VERDON'S. 

This was the estate of Ralph Baignard at the time of the Survey. 
In 1306 John de Bruisyard held the Manor of Shadingfield of the King 
as of his Manor of Framlingham/ which descended to John, his son and heir, 
who paid 20 to the King as a relief for his father's possessions here held 
of the same Manor of Framlingham by the service of four knights' fees, 
which knights' fees were in " Shadenesfeld." On John's death the manor 
probably went to his widow Elizabeth, and then to Henry de Brusyard. 
He levied a fine of the manor with Beatrice his wife in 1334 against 
Kentigernus, parson of Rushmere church, and John, parson of Gasthorp 

'Dom; ii. 2886. s Dom. ii. 412. 

'Dom.- ii. 335&. 6 Dom. ii. 4156. 

'Dom. ii. 336. T I.P.M. 35 Edw. 1. 34 Extent. 

* Dom. ii. 412. 

C I 



210 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

church, no doubt trustees. 1 In 1340 a fine of the " Manor of Shadingfield " 
was levied by Sir William Carbonel and Margaret his wife against Baldewyn 
Ploghwright, chaplain." 

In 1378 the manor was vested in Walter Duke, of Brampton, and passed 
on his death to his son and heir Roger Duke, and then to his son and heir 
Robert Duke, who held in 1432. 

From Robert the manor passed to his son and heir, John Duke, and 
from him passed to his son and heir, Thomas Duke, who was living in 1492. 
He married Margaret, daughter and heir of Henry Banyard, of Spectishall, 
and on his death the manor passed to his son and heir, William Duke, who 
married Thomasine, daughter of Sir Edward Jenney, Knt., and on his death 
was succeeded by his son and heir, George Duke, of Brampton, who married 
Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Blennerhasset, of Frenze, in Norfolk, Knt. 
By an inquis p.m., taken 2oth Oct. 1584, William Playters, of Sotterley, 
was found to die seised of the manor and advowson of Shadingfield, and by a 
like inquisition taken at Norwich Castle loth August, 1598, Edward Duke, 
son and heir of the above-named George Duke, was found to die, 2Oth April 
preceding, seised of the Manor of Brusyard, &c., in Shadingfield, held of the 
Queen as of her Castle of Framlingham for half a knight's fee, and valued 

at 3- 

Of course, the manor of which Playters died seised may have been 
another Manor of Shadingfield than that held by the Dukes, especially as 
Suckling says that at the time he wrote in 1846 Shadingfield still possessed 
seven manors, but Davy says that Playters died seised of the reversion of 
the same manor as that held by the Dukes. It is clear that Brosyard 
Manor was held by the above-named Edward Duke, who died in 1598, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Ambrose Duke, 3 and from this 
time to the time of Sir John Duke, 2nd Bart., the manor passed in the same 
way as the Manor of Benhall, in Plomesgate Hundred. 

The manor now belongs to the Earl of Stradbrooke. Writing in 1846, 
Suckling says : "The seven manors in Shadingfield were then held the ist 
by the Marquis of Salisbury, the 2nd by John Garden, the 3rd by -the Duke of 
Norfolk, the 4th by the Earl of Gosford, each of whom received free rents. 
He adds that Thomas Charles Scots, Thomas Farr, and B. Pierson claimed 
manors in right of their estates, but they were nominal or reputed 
manors only. 4 

MANQR OF FRANCIS OR CUDDON'S. 

This lordship was in 1316 vested in Hugh de Berry, and in 1378 in John 
Francis, 5 though Davy states that John Randolf was lord in 1433 ; yet the 
manor was certainly acquired by Robert Cuddon, Bailiff of Dunwich, by 
marriage about 1432 with Elizabeth, daughter and sole heir of John Francis 
or Franceys, of Shadingfield Hall. 

The Cuddons are an old Suffolk family. The name variously spelt 
Codon, Codun, Codoun, and Cuddon, is said to be derived from Cudun, in 

1 Feet of Fines, 8 Edw. III. 23. 5 He is probably the John Fraunceys of 

1 Feet of Fines, 14 Edw. III. 2. Shadingfield mentioned in the 

J For alliances, see Hales Hall Manor, Patent Rolls (19 Edw. III.pt. ii. 24.) 

Brampton, in Blything Hundred. The writer has several deeds relating 

4 Suckling, Hist, of Suff. vol. i. p. 73. to land in Shadingfield in the time 

of Edw. III. and Edw. IV. made 
by the Francis family. 



SHADINGFIELD. 211 

Normandy. In 1270 Ganfridus Codon appears as a witness to a deed. 
The following members of the family represented Dunwich in Parliament : 

Edw. I. 35 Parl. at Carlisle, Robert Codoun. 

Edw. III. 5 Parl. at Westminster, Geoffrey Codoun. 

Edw. III. 46-47 Rich. II. 6 Parl. at Westminister, Petrus Codoun. 

Rich. II. 7 Parl. at New Sarum, Petrus Codoun. 

Rich. II. 12 Parl. at Cambridge, Peter Codoun. 

Rich. II. 18 Parl. at Westminster, Robert Codoun. 

Hen. IV. i & 2 Parl. at Westminster, Petrus Codoun. 

Hen. V. 9 Parl. at Westminster, Robert Codoun. 

Hen. VI. 4 Parl. at Leicester, Robert Codoun. 

Hen. VI. 9 Parl. at Westminster, Richard Codoun. 

Hen. VI. 20 Parl. at Westminster, Robert Codoun. 

Hen. VI. 27 Parl. at Winchester, Richard Codoun. 

Hen. VI. 29 Parl. at Westminster, Robert Codoun. 

Blomefield, in his History of Norfolk, informs us that in the house of 
Francis Cuddon, at Mulbarton, in the tapestry hangings in the parlour, 
were the arms of Cuddon, quartering Francis, of Shadingfield, Cuddon and 
Duke, Cuddon and Berney, Cuddon and Baynard, Jenney and Cuddon, 
Brampton and Cuddon, Kemp and Cuddon and Hall, Cuddon and Wren, 
quartering Lucy ; Cuddon and Playters, Cuddon and Goldingham. 

Robert Cuddon died in 1462, and was succeeded by his son and heir, 
Peter Cuddon, of Dunwich, from whom the manor passed to his only son 
and heir, George Cuddon, who married a Miss Barney, of Gunton, co. 
Norfolk, and from him passed to his son and heir, Peter Cuddon, who married 
Elizabeth, daughter of John Halse, and on his death passed to his son, 
Robert Cuddon. He married Ann, daughter of John Barney, of Reedham, 
co. Norfolk, 1 and on his death the manor passed to his son and heir, William 
Cuddon. He married ist Mary, daughter and coheir of George Harvey, 
of Olton, who died 22nd Nov. 1586, and 2ndly Elizabeth, elder daughter 
of Witham Playters, of Sotterley. This Elizabeth presented to the church 
of Shadingfield a communion cloth of fine linen bordered with a deep fringe 
of lace work, the appropriation of which we learn from a memorandum 
inserted within the lid of an antique box of oak, in which this relic^ is, or 
was, until recently preserved. "This box, with a cloath for the comunion 
table was given to the parish Church of Shadingfield by Elizabeth Cuddon, 
the wife of William Cuddon, gent, the xxv day of December Anno Dni. 1632." 

On William Cuddon's death, igth Dec. 1634, the manor passed to his 
2nd son, Francis Cuddon. He married ist Mary, daughter of Edward 
Boston, of Burnham Westgate, in Norfolk, and after her death, which 
occurred 8th June, 1640, married 2ndly 27th Sept. 1642, Elizabeth, daughter 
of Robert Warner, of Cratfield, and on his death 2ist Dec. 1673, the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Robert Cuddon. He married 3 ist May, 
1670, Susan/ daughter of George Pretyman, of Bacton, and widow of one 
Brook. He had a son, Warner Cuddon, who left issue by Eleanor his wife, 
four daughters only, and on his death 4th May, 1699, the manor devolved 
on his brother, Sir Thomas Cuddon, Knt., Chamberlain of the City of 
London, and Receiver-General of the Taxes for London and Middlesex. 
He was a member of the Leather Sellers' Company, of which he was Master 
in 1698. He was knighted at Kensington i8th Nov. 1697, and married 

'She died 7th Dec. 1618, aged 88 years. 'She died 2nd March 1721, aged 81 years. 



212 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

ist, in 1675, Ann, daughter of Isaac Jurin, of St. Antholin's, and 2ndly 
Ehzabeth, who afterwards was married to Alderman Sir Thomas Lane. 
Sir Thomas Cuddon died 3rd Dec. 1702, and the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Francis Cuddon, of Lambeth, Receiver-General of the Taxes for 
London and Middlesex. He was a member of the Fishmonger's Company 
1697-8, and died without issue, being buried nth June, 1703, when the 
manor passed to his brother, Ebenezer Cuddon, of Shadingfield Hall, and 
of Chelsea, and subsequently of Wisley, in Surrey. He sold the manor to 
- Round, of Essex. It afterwards passed to Thomas Kilner, who sold the 
same to Charles Thomas Scott. 

Shadingfield Hall, the old manor house of the Cuddons, was in many 
ways an interesting building. Built of red brick somewhere about the 
year 1540, it formed a picturesque pile of gables and chimneys. It was 
surrounded by a moat, some remains of which still exist. Within the moat 
was a wall about 8 feet high pierced with " squints for the discharge of 
arrows." The gables of the house were castellated, or graduated in steps. 
Situated about three-quarters of a mile from the road, it must in olden days 
have been as secluded a spot as could well have been found. 

The present hall is an elegant modern edifice not far from the site of 
the old manor house, and was erected by Mr. T. C. Scott. The following 
armorial bearings of the Cuddons were formerly on a hatchment in Shading- 
field church : " Quarterly, ist and 4th Cuddon, Arg. or Chev. gules, on a 
chief az. three bezants 3rd and 4th Newman, Arg. a fess wavy gules, between 
three eagles, displayed, Sable, impaling Berney of four coats, i, Berney, 
per pale az. and gules, a cross engrailed ermine. 2. Reedham, gules, a chev. 
engrailed arg. between 3 reed-sheaves or. 3 Caston, gules, a chevron between 
3 eagles displayed arg. 4. Brandiston arg. on a canton gules, a cross or. 
Also on a second hatchment : Quarterly, ist and 4th Harvey, gules on a 
bend, arg. 3 trefoils vert. 2 ... sab. a boar's head couped, argent 
3 ... arg. 3 griffins' heads erased, sab. impaling Berney. And on 
the seat belonging to Shadingfield Hall, withinside, were two shields painted 
on the panels : ist Cuddon impaling Berney, single, and 2nd gules, a bend 
argent, impaling Berney." 1 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1577 under the head " Fraunces 
Manor" by Henry Barney and others against Anna Cuddon, widow, and 
others, 1 and in 1582 under the head " Cuddons Manor " by John Trace 
against Thomas Beker and others. 3 

Arms of FRANCIS : Argent, a fesse indented Gules, between 3 eagles 
displayed, Sable. CUDDON : Argent, a chevron, Gules, on a chief, Azure, 
three bezants. 



1 Jermyn MSS. J Fine, Easter, 24 Eliz. 

'Fine, Easter, 19 Eliz. 




SHIPMEADOW. 213 

SHIPMEADOW. 

^^ were only two estates here in Saxon times. The 

ri^^3 first was held by three freemen, and consisted of 15 acres 
WZ&tf^ an d a ploughteam, valued at 35. When the Survey was 
taken it was held by Earl Hugh, and there was only half 
a team. 1 

The second was held by a freeman under Aluric's 
commendation, consisting of 10 acres and half a ploughteam, 
and an acre of meadow, valued at 35. When the Survey was taken this 
estate was held by Godwin of Roger Bigot, and was valued at 45.* 

SHIPMEADOW MANOR. 

In 1240 Walter de Shipmeadow was lord, and conveyed by fine his 
right of fishing in the River Waveney between the parishes of Stockton and 
Shipmeadow, and in the cutting of reed, rush, flag, &c., to Ralph Bigot, a 
younger son of Hugh Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, by Maud, eldest daughter of 
William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke. 

In 1302 Sir John de Norwich 3 was lord, and had a grant of free warren 
here. He died in 1316, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir 
Walter de Norwich, the Baron of the Exchequer in 1311, and from this time 
to the death of Sir John de Norwich in 1374 without issue, the manor passed 
in the same course as the Manor of Dalham, in Risbridge Hundred. Sir 
Walter de Norwich had a grant of free warren in this manor in 1311,* and 
it is specifically mentioned in his inquis. p.m. in 1329. 5 It is also included 
in a fine levied in 1344 by Sir John de Norwich and Margaret his wife 
against Sir Henry de Harnhall, 6 also in a grant of free warren to Sir John 
in I357, 7 and in his inquis. p.m. in 1362," and in that of Margery de Norwich 
in 1366.' 

In 1381 the manor was granted to Sir John Plays, Sir Robert Howard, 
and others as an endowment for Raveningham College 10 in 1394 going to 
the College of Mettingham. After the dissolution of that establishment 
this manor was granted with the possessions in the neighbourhood to the 
family of Denny. The grant to Sir Anthony Denny 11 was made in 1549, 
in which year on the 5th Sept. he died," when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Henry Denny, who sold it in 1563 to Sir Nicholas Bacon, Knt. 13 
A survey made of the manor by John Hille for Sir Nicholas Bacon in 1562 
prior to this purchase will be found amongst the Additional MSS. in 
the British Museum.' 4 A fine was levied of the manor in 1566 by Robert 
Catlyn, Knt., and others, against Sir Nicholas Bacon, 13 no doubt on the 
occasion of some settlement, for Sir Nicholas, the Lord Keeper, died seised 
of it in 1579, when it passed to his son and heir, Sir Nicholas, who was the 
first person advanced to the dignity of a baronet. He died I3th Nov. 
1624, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Edmund Bacon, and 
on his death without issue loth April, 1649, passed to his brother and heir, 

'Dom. ii. 301: "l.P.M., 36 Edw. III. 9 pt. ii. 6. 

2 Dom. ii. 3356. I.P.M., 40 Edw. III. 28. 
3 See Mettingham Castle Manor, in this 10 I.P.M.,5 Rich. II. 88. 

Hundred. " See Manor of Ilketshall, in this Hundred. 

4 Chart. Rolls, 5 Edw. II. 44. ' I.P.M., 4 Edw. VI. 105. 

5 1.P.M., 3 Edw. III. 58. -3 Fine, Hil. 5 Eliz. 

6 Feet of Fines, 18 Edw. III. 5. -<Add. 14850. 

'Chart. Rolls, 31 Edw. HI. 2. 'J Fine, Trin. 8 Eliz. 



_>i4 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Sir Robert Bacon, in whose lifetime it seems to have passed to his eldest 
son, Robert Bacon, who married Catherine, daughter of Grave Violet, of 
Pynkney House, near Thetford, who died in his father's lifetime, 25th 
Aug. 1652, when the manor passed to his trustees, Sir John Hobart, Bart., 
Sir William Doyly, Knt., George Reeve, and others, who held a court for 
this manor 8th September, 1654, as appears from evidence in the writer's 
possession, Sir Edward Duke and his son Ambrose Duke, being at that 
court admitted to certain copyholds held of the manor. 

The manor was probably acquired a little later by Robert Suckling, 
of Woodton and Barsham, who was High Sheriff of Norfolk in 1661. He 
married ist Anne, daughter of Sir Thomas Wodehouse, of Kimberley, and 
2ndly Margaret, daughter of Sir William Doyley, of Shottisham. His will 
is dated 2Oth June, 1681, and he died in June, 1690, when the manor passed 
to his son and heir, Robert Suckling, who was High Sheriff of Norfolk in 
1701, and died in 1708, from which time the manor has passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Barsham, in this Hundred. 




SOTTERLEY. 215 

SOTTERLEY. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Burchard, con- 
sisting of i carucates of land, 4 villeins, a church with 7 
acres, 3 bordars, 2 serfs, and 2 ploughteams in demesne. 
Also sufficient wood to support 100 hogs, 4 acres of meadow, 
a rouncy, 14 beasts, 31 hogs, 120 sheep, and 30 goats. The 
value of the whole was 535. 4^. 

When the Survey was taken the manor was held of 
Earl Hugh by Mundret, the villeins were reduced to 3, the bordars had 
increased to 16, and there were 3 ploughteams in demesne, and 3 oxen. 1 

SOTTERLEY MANOR. 

In the time of Hen. III. Edmund de Sotterley held the manor and one 
knight's fee of the Honor of Chester. 2 In 1275 Roger de Sotterley was lord, 
and claimed view of frankpledge and assize of bread and beer here. 3 In 
1281 Edmund de Sotterley held the manor, which on his death passed to 
his son and heir, Roger de Sotterley, who died in I3I2, 4 when it devolved 
on his son and heir, Sir Edmund de Sotterley, who had a grant of free warren 
in 1314. 5 At his death he was found to hold a knight's fee here of the 
Honor of Chester, in which county he also held an estate, and the jury 
presented that he held the lordship of Sotterley with those of Stoke and 
Harthe, in Cheshire, by the service of finding one armed horseman to attend 
the Earl of Chester into Wales for 40 days at his own cost during the time 
of war. In 1343 Roger de Sotterley, son of Sir Edmund, held this manor, 
and granted the Manor of Uggeshall to the Lady Joan his mother for life, 
provided she claimed no dower in the manors of Sotterley, in Suffolk, and 
Stody, in Norfolk. In 1380 it was returned that Edmund de Sotterley 
held at the time of his decease (which was this same year) conjointly with 
Margaret his wife, the Manor of Sotterley, with the advowson of the church, 
and that Robert 6 was his son and heir. 7 Margaret Sotterley 8 enjoyed this 
property after the decease of her husband, whom she survived four years ; 
for in 1384 it was returned that Margaret, widow of Edmund de Sotterley, 
held at the time of her death this manor and advowson of the King as of 
his County of Chester by the service of one knight's fee. 9 

Robert de Sotterley her son held these estates by the same tenure, and 
purchased of Sir Ralph Bigod us. 6d. free rent, with the rent of 1,500 
herrings in Gisleham and Sotterley. 

Amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum is an indenture 
dated the Saturday after S. Mich. 9 Rich. II. [1385], in French, whereby 
Roberd, son of Esmond Soterlee, is bound to William Joce, and to Roger, 
Walter, Thomas, and Esmon, his brothers, in 200 to observe the settlement 
of the manor and advowson of Soterlee. 10 

On Robert Sotterley's death the manor passed to his brother, Walter 
Sotterley probably Roger, his 2nd brother, had previously died. Walter 

'Dom. ii. 301, 3016. 'I.P.M., 6 Rich. II. 49. 

*T. deN. 291. 'See Uggeshall Manor, in Blything 
3 Q.W. 723. Hundred. 

4 Extent, I.P.M., 6 Edw. II. 33. 9 I.P.M., 8 Rich. II. 31. 

'Chart. Rolls, 8 Edw. II. 17. '"Add. Ch. 10381. 
'Suckling incorrectly says Roger, but 
Roger was the second son. 



216 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

died in 1408, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Edmund Sotterley, 
who is said to have died in 1408, and was certainly dead without issue by 
1413,' when the manor passed to his brother and heir, Thomas Sotterley. 
Thomas Sotterley proved his age in 1429.* In 1451 Sir Miles Stapleton 
and others were feoffees of the Manor of Rollesby, in Norfolk, for this 
Thomas Sotterley, which manor he devised to Elizabeth his wife and her 
heirs. She, however, dying before him, he ordered the same to be sold and 
the proceeds to be disposed of for the soul of the said Elizabeth. Thomas 
Sotterley died in 1468.' 

About 1470 Thomas Sotterley, the then lord, probably son of the last 
Thomas, being an adherent of the House of Lancaster, forfeited his estates, 
and they were bestowed with this manor upon Thomas Playters, a follower 
of the House of York. 

In 1475 a fine was levied of the manor by this Thomas Playters, with 
William Breme, and William Clerk, against Thomas Cheyne, relative and 
heir of Thomas Sotterley. 4 

Suckling mentions that in 1477 a Thomas Sotterley was entered in 
the conventual church of the Austin Friars at Norwich, and he was 
possibly the unfortunate exiled Lancastrian. 

It is not easy to see how this could have been the case in view of the 
fine levied as above mentioned in 1475 against the relative and heir of Thomas 
Sotterley. Evidently the- Thomas dispossessed must have been then dead. 

From Thomas Playters, who died in 1479,' to the time of Sir John 
Playters, 5th Bart., in 1740, the manor descended in the same course as 
the Manor of Uggeshall, in Blything Hundred, when John Playters, in 1744, 
in the lifetime of his father, sold the paternal estate to Miles Barne, the son 
of a merchant in London, M.P. for Dunwich, and 6th in descent from Sir 
George Barne, Lord Mayor of London in 1552. He pulled down the old 
hall and built a fine house on nearly the same site. Suckling mentions 
that the estate was then so covered with timber as to render it an objec- 
tionable purchase, so little was the value of the forest trees at that time 
understood, and that a manuscript formerly in the possession of Sir William 
John Playters, of Yelverton, in Norfolk, the last baronet, relates that 
Mr. Barne felled sufficient timber to pay the purchase money, and left 
Sotterley one of the best wooded estates in Suffolk. Miles Barne married 
ist Elizabeth, daughter and heir of Nathaniel Elwick, Governor of Madras, 
and 2ndly Maria, eldest daughter of Geo. Thornhill, of Diddington, Hunting- 
donshire, and died 2oth Dec. 1780, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
Miles Barne, M.P. for Dunwich from 1791 to 1796, and on his death 8th 
Sept. 1825, without issue it passed to his half-brother and heir, Barne 
Barne, on whose death without issue in 1828, it passed to his brother and 
heir, Michael Barne, M.P. for Dunwich, who married in 1798 Mary, daughter 
of Ayscoghe Boucherett, of Willingham and Stalingborough, co. Lincoln, 
and died in 1837, when the manor devolved on his son and 
heir, Frederick Barne. He married in 1834 Mary Anne Elizabeth, eldest 
daughter of Sir John Courtenay Honey wood, Bart., and on his death in 
1886 the manor passed to his son and heir, Frederick St. John Newdegate 
Barne, M.P. for East Suffolk, 1876-85, who in 1871 married Lady Constance, 

'I.P.M., i Hen. V. 42. 4 Feet of Fines, 15 Edw. IV. 5. 

See Escheats, 7 Hen. VI. 72. 'I.P.M., 19 Edw. IV. 62. 

M.P.M., 7 Edw. IV. 33; 



SOTTERLEY. 217 

5th daughter of Francis George Hugh, 5th Marquis of Hertford, and on his 
death, 25th Jan. 1898, the manor passed to his son and heir, Capt. Miles 
Barne, in whom the same is now vested. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of William 
Playters, who died 25th Dec. 1561, leaving Christopher his son and heir, 1 
and in that of Christopher, who died nth Sept. 1547, leaving Thomas his 
son and heir.* Amongst the Exchequer Depositions we meet with an 
action by Thomas Jolleye and others against Robert Berney and others 
in 1584, relating to the customs of the manor and courts leet, William Play- 
ters being then lord. 3 

Arms of BARNE : Quarterly ; first and fourth, Azure, three leopards' 
heads, Argent ; second and third, Argent, a chevron, Azure, between three 
Cornish choughs proper. 



1 1.P.M., 9 Hen. VIII. 84. 3 Exch. Dep. Beccles, 1584. 

"I.P.M., 2Edw. VI. 66. 



D I 




2i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WESTON. 

|HERE were three manors in this place in Saxon times. 
At the time of the Survey they were held by Roger Bigot 
for the King. The first, formerly belonging to Hacun, a 
freeman under the Confessor, consisted of 40 acres, a villein, 
2 bordars, half a ploughteam in demesne and half belonging 
to the men, and sufficient wood to support 10 hogs.' 

The second, formerly held by Ailric, a freeman under 
Gurth's commendation, consisted also of 40 acres, a bordar, half a 
ploughteam, enough wood to support 4 hogs, and an acre of meadow. All 
this rendered in the Confessor's time 6s. Sd. 

The third, formerly that of Sprottulf, a freeman under Gurth's com- 
mendation, consisted of 30 acres, 2 bordars, a ploughteam (reduced to half 
a team at the time of the Survey), 2 oxen belonging to the men, and half an 
acre of meadow. 1 

Roger Bigot also had a church held by the King's freemen, with 20 
acres, valued at 35.' 

Among the lands of Stigand kept in the King's hands by William de 
Noers was a holding in this place, formerly that of two freemen and a half, 
under Stigand's commendation. It consisted of 12 acres and a plough- 
team, valued at 2s. Also a church with 20 acres, valued at 35.* 

Two small estates were held here by Roger Bigot at the time of the 
Survey. One was formerly the estate of five freemen under Burchard's 
commendation, consisting of 18 acres of land and a ploughteam. They 
were included in the valuation of Willingham. 

The other estate was formerly that of three freemen, one of them, 
Ketel, under Aluric's commendation, having 30 acres, the other two having 
6 acres under him. Also a villein, 5 bordars, a ploughteam, enough wood 
to support 6 hogs, and an acre of meadow. The value was ros. and the 
Survey says : " Later he was set to farm to the value of 405." At the 
time of the Survey he rendered 305., and R. de Vallibus held the estate of 
Roger Bigot over him. 5 

Hugh de Montfort had a small estate here at the time of the Survey, 
formerly held by a freeman under Burchard's commendation. It consisted 
of 16 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at 5$., and 400 herrings. 6 

The last estate mentioned was a small one of Geoffrey de Magnaville, 
formerly held by a freeman, consisting of 5 acres, valued at i6d. 7 

WESTON MANOR. 

Suckling informs us that " Henry I. granted a manor which extended 
over this parish and part of Beccles to William de Luvell, from whom it 
was called Stoka Luvelli. William de Luvell sold it to William de Longo 
Campo, at that time Chancellor of England, who gave it to Henry his son, 
who bestowed it, as a marriage portion, on his daughter, the wife of Robert 
Gresle, who held it when the Record called Testa de Nevill was compiled. 
By what tenure this ' Soke ' or power of administering justice and executing 
the laws of the land within its limits, was held, is not recorded." 8 

1 Dom. ii. 2826. 3 Dom. ii. 335*. 

* Dom. ii. 283. 6 Dom. ii. 407. 

J Dom. ii. 3356. 7 Dom. ii. 412*. 

4 Dom. ii. 288*. "Hist of Suff. vol. i. p. 97. 



WESTON. 219 

In 1267 Walter de Redesham had a grant of free warren here, 1 and he 
probably held the manor. He died in 1292, and was succeeded by Edmund 
de Redesham. In 1280 Hugh de Berry held the lordship, which a little 
later passed to Walter de Norwich, who died without issue in 1329. 2 He 
had a grant of free warren here in 131 1. 3 

Subsequently the manor was held by William de Barsham, who sold 
it to Robert Garneys, 4 of Ros Hall, Beccles, who gave it to William Garneys, 
of Stockton, his son. 

William Garneys, by his will, dated the i3th Feb. 1420, and proved 
6th April, 1425, leaves to Elizabeth his widow, daughter and heir of Sir 
Ralph Bigot, his Manor of Weston and all his estates in the Hundred of 
Wangford which his father had bought of William de Barsham for the term 
of her life, on condition that she maintained Ralph and Robert his sons 
to full age and did not remarry, then the feoffees were to enfeoff Robert 
his son of the Manor of Weston for himself and the heirs of his body, and 
in default of issue to Ralph his son. 

Amongst the Cotton Charters in the British Museum we find what is 
called a demise of Sir William Phelip, Sir John Fastolf, and others, to Ralph, 
son of William Garneys, of this manor in tail to him and his right heirs, 
with remainder to Peter Garneys, uncle of the grantee and his right heirs, 
failing which to the right heirs of the above William Garneys. 5 The deed 
is dated 3oth Nov. 14 Hen. VI. [1435], and is accompanied by a power of 
attorney from the said Sir William Phelip, Sir John Fastolf, and others, to 
John Vernoun and John Honyngham, clerks, to give seisin accordingly. 6 

The manor is also included in an appointment in the January following 
made by Ralph Garneys, of William Bonde and Robert Ludlowe, to deliver 
seisin to Sir Thomas Kerdestone and John Hevenyngham, Knts., William 
Pastone, John Berney, and others, no doubt on the occasion of some settle- 
ment/ and also in a demise by these trustees the following year to the said 
Ralph Garneys. 8 

On the death of Ralph Garneys, who died without issue about 1450, 
the manor passed to Peter Garneys, of Beccles, his uncle. He made his 
will, dated the 2oth Aug. 1450,' whereby he devised the manor to feoffees 
to enfeoff his son Thomas in the same year after his decease according to 
the will of William Garneys his brother. Thomas Garneys died in 1458 
(? 1489), when it passed to his son and heir, John Garneys, of Kenton. A 
fine was levied in 1517 against him and his wife Elizabeth by Sir Edmund 
Jermy and others. 10 John Garneys died in 1524. 

By an exemplification of a recovery in 1535" it appears that Robert 
Garneys held the Manor of Weston juxta Beccles, with its appurtenances 
and 10 messuages, 8 tofts, 500 acres arable, 60 acres of meadow, 500 pasture, 
and 2 of wood, with 4 rent in Weston, Kenton, Debenham, Beccles, Elowe, 
Worlingham, and Shanfield. 

Robert Garneys died in 1556, when the manor went to his son and heir, 
John Garneys, who died before 1560, when it vested in his son and heir, 
Thomas Garneys, who levied a fine of it the nth Nov. 1560. ia Thomas 

'Chart. Rolls, Hen. III. 'Harl. 50 F. 37. 

'I.P.M., 5 Edw. III. 58. Harl. 50 F. 39. 

3 Chart. Rolls, 5 Edw. II. 44. 'Proved 5th Feb. in the following year. 

* See Kenton Manor, in Loes Hundred. I0 Fine, Easter, 9 Hen. VIII. 

'Cotton, v. 3. "27 Hen. VIII. 

'Cotton, v. 22. "Fine, 2 Eliz. 63. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Garneys died without issue 2Oth Oct. 1566. He was found to have died 
seised of, amongst other hereditaments, the Manor of Weston, held of Sir 
Thomas Gresham and Ann his wife as of their Manor of Beccles, late parcel 
of the possessions of Bury Abbey, in socage, by fealty and IDS. rent, valued 
at 5 marks per annum. 

On Thomas Garneys' death the manor devolved on his brother and 
heir, Nicholas Garneys, who sold the same in 1595 to Thomas Kempe. ; 

Thomas Kemp was the son of Robert Kemp of Gissing, by Elizabeth 
his wife, daughter of Edmund Grey, of Martyn, in Norfolk, eighth in descent 
from Allan Kemp, of Weston, who lived in the time of Edw. II. 1 He 
married Ann, eldest daughter and coheir of John Moore, of Ipswich, and 
died the aist May, 1622. 3 The manor was then found to be held of the 
Manor of Beccles in socage and at the rent of xos. per annum, and to be 
worth loos, a year. The manor passed to Thomas's son and heir, John 
Kempe, who married 1st Elizabeth, daughter of John Darby, of Bramford, 
and 2ndly Jane, daughter and coheir of Thomas Hobart, of Thwait, in 
Norfolk, and on his death the manor probably passed to his son and heir, 
Thomas Kempe. 

In 1704 the manor was held by Sir Edward Ward, of Bexley, Norfolk, 
4th Bart., on whose death it passed to his widow Barbara, daughter and 
coheir of Leonard Gooch, of Earsham, in Norfolk, and 5th Bart. He 
married Susan, daughter and heir of William Randall, of Yarmouth, 
merchant, and died 2nd March, 1734-7, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Sir Edward Ward, 6th Bart., who died unmarried 7th April, 1742 
at the age of 21, when the manor passed to his brother and heir, Sir Randall 
Ward, 7th Bart. On Sir Randall's death the 8th May, 1762, the manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Edward Ward, 8th Bart., who died without 
issue about 1770, when it went to his aunt Susanna, married to the Earl 
of Rosebery, who sold the same about 1809 to Thomas Farr, of Beccles. 

Davy, however, makes Miles Barne, of Sotterley, lord, from whom, 
he states, the manor passed in 1780 to his son and heir, Miles Barne, who 
died in 1825, and, in fact, deduces the title through the Barne family to 
1837 * n tne same course as the Manor of Sotterley, in this Hundred. 

Davy, however, confounded the Manor of Weston with Weston Hall, 
which was not the manor house, but a small structure in the Elizabethan 
style which belonged to the Rede family, and later to the Barne family, 
and in 1844 was held by Frederick Barne, though then occupied by a farmer. 
The ancient manor house was Walpole Hall, and this in 1844 with the manor 
belonged to Thomas Farr. He was the son of John Farr, and married 7th 
June, 1792, Georgiana, daughter of Sir Thomas Gooch, Bart. He died 
gth June, 1850, at the age of 87, when the manor passed to his son and heir, 
the Rev. Thomas Farr, who was lord in 1855. The manor subsequently 
vested in moieties in the Rev. Robert Thomas Oliver Sheriffe 4 and the Rev. 
George Ayton Whitaker, who were cousins, being grandsons through the 
mother of Mr. Fair. The manor was, in Michaelmas, 1894, sold by these 
cousins to R. H. Inglis Palgrave, of Belton, who is the present lord. 

Suckling says : " The manor-house called Walpole Hall is a mere 
fragment of a very old mansion. In the south wall of what seems to have 
been a chapel, though only about sixteen feet long, is a recess very like a 

'Fine, Hil. 37 Eliz. si. P.M., 20 Jac. I. 

'Harl. 1820, 1552. 4 See Henstead Manor, in Blything Hun- 

dred. 



WESTON. 221 

festenella, retaining a portion of an old shelf of oak. The courts for the 
manor are held here, and adjourned to some more convenient place. 

" Weston Hall, a handsome habitable mansion, was in great part 
demolished about 20 years ago, and the projecting angle of the southern 
facade converted into a farmhouse. It was a good, well-proportioned 
building, with notched gables and pedimented windows, but deficient in 
the elegant and decorated finials so frequent in old Elizabethan mansions. 
It was erected in the latter part of the i6th century by John Rede, Esq., 
who possessed a good estate in the village, which passed by sale to the 
family of Barry, and is now, by a like transfer, held by the Barnes, of 
Sotterley. 

" Weston Hall, or that fragment of it which retains the name, stands 
near the high road, which formerly passed close to its door, in a sloping, 
pleasant meadow, still environed by a few old trees, and commanding a 
view of the church, and of a rising knoll of ground to the south-east. On 
this eminence is placed a small but curious edifice of red brick, built in a 
style of architecture prevalent in the time of Chas. II., and marking the 
taste of Thomas Rede, Esq., whose initials remain on its western front. 
The interior of this fanciful little dwelling is finished rather expensively 
with moulded cornices and wrought ceilings ; and though still two storeys 
high, was originally much loftier. It is said to have been erected for a 
summer-house, as its upper floor commanded a view of the German Ocean, 
but tradition relates that it was early convenient to a purpose far less 
innocent." 1 

Compotus Rolls of this manor will be found from 1388-91 and 1404-8 
amongst the Additional Charters in the British Museum. 2 And amongst 
the Chancery Proceedings will be found an action by Roger Pierson and 
John Britton against Robert Cowper and Peter Cuddon to recover 
possession of sites and demesne lands of Weston and Redisham Parva 
Manors, held under a lease from Nicholas Garneys, owner of the inheritance. 3 

We meet with a fine levied of a moiety of the manor in 1542 by Thomas 
Tey and others against John Drury and others, 4 and in 1546 of the Manor 
by John Fastolf against the said John Drury, 5 while yet a third fine was 
levied in 1558 by Peter Rede against George Rede. 6 

Arms of KEMPE : Gules, three garbs within a bordure engrailed Or. 
Of WARD : Chequy, Or and Azure, a bend Ermine. Of FARR : A saltire, 
between 4 fleurs-de-lis. 



1 Suckling, Hist, of Suff. vol. i. p. 98. * Fine, Mich. 34 Hen. VIII. 

"Add Ch. 26061, 26062. 5 Fine, Easter, 38 Hen. VIII; 

3 C.P. ii. 315. 6 Fine, Trin. 5 Mary L 




222 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WILLINGHAM. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Gunnulf under 
commendation to Burchard. It consisted of 30 acres, a 
villein (which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), 
a ploughteam and i belonging to the men, wood for the 
maintenance of 10 hogs, and ij acres of meadow. Of live 
stock there were 2 beasts, 8 hogs, 20 sheep, and 20 goats, 
valued at ios., which value was doubled at the time of the 
Survey. It was a league long and a league broad, and paid in a gelt $d. 
The Domesday tenant was Roger Bigot. 1 

Here also was a holding of five freemen under Burchard's commenda- 
tion, consisting of 80 acres of land, a villein, a bordar, 2 ploughteams, wood 
sufficient to support 10 hogs, and an acre of meadow. The value was ios., 
increased to 20s. at the time of the Survey, when held by Roger Bigot. 1 

Hugh de Montfort had two estates in this place at the time of the 
Survey. The first was held in the time of the Confessor by 15 freeman 
under Burchard's commendation, and consisted of a carucate and a half 
of land in demesne, and 18 acres, also 2 villeins, 7 ploughteams (reduced 
by I at the time of the Survey), wood for the maintenance of 10 hogs, and 
an acre of meadow. Also a church with 40 acres, valued at 75. Several 
persons had part thereof. 

The value was formerly 6os., but at the time of the Survey 305. and y^d. 
and 3,000 herrings. Thesoc belonged to the King and Earl. 3 

The second estate was formerly that of a freeman under Burchard's 
commendation, and this freeman could neither sell nor give his land. It 
consisted of 3 acres of free land, valued at i8d. and 100 herrings. 4 

The King also held the hamlet of Melga and 60 acres in Willingham. 
There were 3 villeins, I ploughteam, and wood sufficient to support 40 
hogs. 5 

WILLINGHAM MANOR. 

In 1258 a grant of free warren was made here to Philip Bocland, 6 and 
he probably held the lordship. 

In 1316 it was vested in Elizabeth Brysiard, and in 1480 was held 
by Robert Bumpstede, who died seised this year, 7 and was buried in the 
chancel of Sotterley church, in this Hundred. By his will he appointed 
John, his eldest son, and Robert Bumpstede, chaplain, another son, his 
executors, and gave the Manor of Willingham St. Mary to Marion his wife 
for life. John Bumpstede succeeded but the manor soon after passed to 
Elizabeth Aslake, widow, daughter and heir of Thomas Bardolf and of 
Alice his wife, daughter and heir of Sir Edmund Berry, Knt., who by deed 
without date granted to Robert Clere, Sir Robert Drury, and Sir Edward 
Jenney, Knts., John Yaxley, serjeant-at-law, and others, the lordship to 
hold to the use of the said Elizabeth for life, after to William Aslack, her 
son, and his heirs, with remainder to Thomas her son, and by an inquisition 
taken 8th April, 1432, William Aslack was found to die seised of the said 
manor I7th June, 1531, and Thomas, son and heir of Christopher Playters 
and of Dorothy, daughter of the said William Aslack,' being the heir.' 

'Dom. ii. 335. 'Chart. Rolls, 42 Hen. III. i. 

*Dom. ii. 335. 7 I.P.M., 19 Edw. IV. 42. 

'Dom. ii. 407. 'In some place " Elizabeth his wife sister 

4 Dom. ii. 407. of the said William Aslack." 

'Dom. ii. 2836. 'Blomefield, Hist, of Norf. 



WILLINGHAM. 223 

From Christopher Playters to the time of Sir John Playters, 6th Bart., 
the manor probably passed in the same course as the Manor of Uggeshall, 
in Ely thing Hundred, but the " site and capital messuage of the manor 
or reputed Manor of Willingham Hall," described as late in the tenure of 
William Jolly, was by a deed of release dated 2Oth June, 1649, granted by 
Sir William Playters, Knt. and Bart., and Thomas Playters, his son and 
heir apparent, to Sir Richard Lucye, of Broxbonnbery, co. Herts., Knt. 
and Bart., and George Anson, of Furford, co. Lincoln. 

The manor later passed to Sir Thomas Robinson, of Worlingham, Bart., 
and then to Robert Sparrow, of Worlingham Hall, who, dying in 1822, 
gave the same to Mary his daughter, married to Archibald, Earl of Gosford. 

In 1896 the manor belonged to the Rev. Sir Charles Clarke, Bart.,M.A. 

We meet with a fine levied of the manor in 1526 by Alan Hord and 
others against Robert Jenour,' and a Manor of "Willisham" is included 
in a fine levied in 1558 by Sir Edward Waldegrave and others against 
William, Lord Windsor. 1 

Arms of BUMPSTEDE : Argent, on a bend engrailed Gules, three mullets 
of the field. Of ASLACK : Sable, a chevron between three Catherine wheels, 
Argent. 



Fine, Trin. 18 Hen. VIII. 'Fine, Hil., 5 Mary I. 




224 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WORLINGHAM. 

[HERE were three manors in this place all held at the time 
of the Survey by Roger Bigot, which he had in keeping for 
the King. The first was formerly held by Wolf, a freeman 
under Gurth's commendation, consisting of 40 acres, 2 
bordars, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow. 

The second was formerly that of Adestan, a freeman 
under Wolsey's commendation, consisting of 40 acres, a 
ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow. 

The third was formerly that of Ethesi, a freeman under Gurth's com- 
mendation, consisting of 30 acres, a ploughteam, and half an acre of meadow. 

Three other estates were in the holding of Roger Bigot for the King. 
One was formerly held by Goodrich, a freeman under Wolsey's commen- 
dation, and consisted of 30 acres, a bordar, ploughteam, and an acre of 
meadow ; another was held of him by 64 freemen, and consisted of 5 caru- 
cates of land, which were always ploughed with 7 teams. Also there were 
4 acres of meadow. The third estate consisted of 2 churches with 40 acres, 
valued at 6s. ; others having part therein. Of one of these churches, R. de 
Vallibus held the half part with 30 acres and a bordar. 1 

Earl Hugh had a small estate in this place of 6 acres, valued at I2d. 
This was formerly held by a freeman under Gurth's commendation. 1 

Belonging to the Abbot of St. Edmunds was half a church in this place 
valued at I2^. 3 

Hugh de Montfort had also an estate here which consisted of 60 acres, 
2 ploughteams, a bordar, and 2 acres of meadow, valued at los. 6d. and 
1,000 herrings. It was formerly held by five freemen and a half under 
commendation to Gurth. 4 

WORLINGHAM MANOR. 

The Testa de Nevill contains the following particulars of the parish 
of Worlingham. In the I3th century : " Our Lord the King gave Soca 
Britonis de Worlingham to the ancestors of Oliver de Tintamac of Bretagne, 
and Hamo de Sibeton now holds it of the gift of the King, but by what 
service is unknown ; and it was a member of Mutford." 5 ' William de 
Cheney holds the Soca Britonis in the Hundred of Wainford, in custody 
for William de Tintincot, and has the custody for Philip de Albon to whom the 
King gave that custody." 8 

The Abbot of Bury was returned by the Sheriff as lord of the Manor of 
Worlingham in 1281, and on the Patent Rolls in 1352 mention is made of 
the letting out of the liberties or franchises of the Abbot of Bury between 
Coplestone and the mill of Worlingham and in Beccles. 7 

In the reign of Hen. VIII. the Bokenhams held the manor, and John 
Bokenham died seised of it ist Aug. 1551," when it passed to his sister and 
heir Dorothy. A branch of the family of Duke subsequently held the 
lordship. Robert Duke was lord in the reign of Edward VI. 

1 Dom. ii. 282$, 283. 5 T. de N. 295. 

Dom. ii. 3016. 6 Ib. 297. 

J Dom. ii. 370. 7 Pat. Rolls, 36 Edw. III. 

4 Dom. ii. 407. I.P.M., 6 Edw. VI. 86. 



WORLINGHAM. 225 

John Duke married Parnell, daughter of Sir Thomas Rous, of Henham, 
soon after 1600. Amongst the Tanner MSS. in the Bodleian is an assurance 
of lands by John Duke, of Worlingham, to his wife for jointure in 1632.' 

John Duke lost his wife Parnell in 1637, an d on a board hanging against 
the south aisle of the church of Worlingham (under a shield) is the following : 
" An Epitaph on Mrs. Parnell Rous alias Duke wife to John Duke of 
Wallingham, in County of Suff. Esqre. made y e 22th. Aprill 1637. 

A Rous by Birth ; by Marriage made a Duke ; 
Christ'ned Parnell, she liu'd without Rebuke ; 
She di'd most St : Like, now take All Together, 
She was vnparallel'd, So Hues for ever." 

In the Martin MSS. we find : " An Epitaph on the Dovelike Virgin 
Mrs. Anne Duke daughter to ye before nam'd persons made ye loth Jan. 
A.D. 1698. 

A Virgin here doth lie a Duke by name 
No soule more spotles none more quitt from blame 
Now her Reward she hath her spouse doth see 
Endles her joyes and her Felicity 
Divine her life was, modest and sincere. 
Untouch't by vice ; her actions pure and clear 
Kept as she hath her soul from whats amisse 
Even so for ever now it rests in blisse." 

We find amongst the Tanner MSS. also two letters from the said John 
Duke to John Hobart as to a patent for salt in 1640,' and also a case as to 
the draft of John Duke's will in 1658. 3 Amongst the same MSS. will be 
found the opinion of Matthew Hale and William Wyndham as to lands in 
Worlingham belonging to the said John Duke. 4 John Duke died in 1649. 

Thomas Duke, of Worlingham, was seised of the advowson and manor 
of Diss, in Norfolk. The manor afterwards passed to John Felton, son of 
the John Felton, of Playford, whose only daughter Elizabeth having married 
Sir John Playters, of Sotterley, carried it to that family. 5 

It did not long remain there, however, for Sir John Playters sold this 
and other estates in the neighbourhood to Sir Thomas Robinson, Bart., 
of Kentwell Hall, in Long Melford, son of Sir Lumley,and grandson of Sir 
Thomas Robinson, Knt., Prothonotary of the Court of Common Pleas, 
who was created a baronet by King Chas. II. 26th Jan. 1681-2. Sir 
Thomas Robinson, the purchaser, married 3Oth May, 1710, Elizabeth, 
daughter of Sir Thomas Hare, 2nd Bart., of Stow Bardolph, Norfolk. He 
sold the residence and property at Long Melford and the neighbourhood 
to John Moore, citizen of London, and made Worlingham his residence. 
He died 2ist April, 1743, without issue, and left the manor to his widow, 
Dame Elizabeth, who died 30th Oct. 1/58,' having previously sold her 
rights in the Manor of Worlingham to George Hare in fee. Hare resold 
the manor 23rd June, 1755, to Robert Sparrow, of Woodbridge, son of 

'Tanner, cclxxxiv. 117, 118. 'Both she and her husband were buried 

1 Ib. cclxxxvi. 121, 128. in a vault beneath the chancel of 

3 Ib. cclxxxiv. 115. the church of Worlingham. Mr. 

*Ib. xci. 171. Cockayne implies that she died in 

5 Elizabeth Playters died I4th Nov. 1748, her husband's lifetime, 
aged 58, and was buried in Worling- 
ham churchyard. 

El 



226 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Robert Sparrow, of-Kettleburgh, by Anne his wife, daughter of Edward 
Foster Marlesford. 

Robert Sparrow, the purchaser of the manor, was baptised at Marlesford 
24th Jan. 1705, and married Anne, daughter of Robert Bence, of Henstead, 
i6th Dec. 1740. He died 2oth Oct. 1765, and was buried at Henstead, 
his widow surviving until 8th Nov. 1776. The manor passed to their 
son and heir, Robert Sparrow, who was baptised at Woodbridge, 24th Oct. 
1741. He resided at Worlingham Hall, and married twice ist 8th July, 
1771, Mary, daughter of Sir John Barnard, Bart., and sister and heir of 





.. -- . _ . _ . - 

WORLINGHAM HALL. 



Sir Robert Barnard. She died gth Feb. 1793, and Robert Sparrow took 
for his 2nd wife in 1797 Mary, daughter of the Rev. Brockhaus, of Hardwick, 
co. Suffolk. He served the office of High Sheriff of Suffolk in 1777, and 
died 8th March, 1822, being buried at Worlingham. His only son, Robert 
Bernard Sparrow, issue of his ist marriage, served in the West Indies, and 
died there 2gth Aug. 1805, at the early age of 32, in his father's lifetime, 
and was buried at Tortola. He married Olivia, eldest daughter of Arthur, 
ist Earl of Gosford, in Dublin, I4th March, 1797, and had a son and daughter. 
The son, Robert Acheson Bernard St. John Sparrow, died at Villa Frances 
Vicar, at the age of 19, and was buried at Peremp, co. Hunts.' Both son 
and grandson having died in the lifetime of Robert Sparrow, on his death 
in 1822 the manor passed to his only daughter Mary, who married the Right 
Hon. Archibald Acheson, 2nd Earl of Gosford. The Earl was created a 
Peer of the United Kingdom in 1835 by the title of Baron Worlingham, of 
Beccles, in the County of Suffolk. 

In 1885 the manor belonged to the Rev. Sir Charles Clarke, 
Bart., M.A., who died in 1889. In 1900 the manor belonged to Frederick 
W. Holham, and now belongs to the Hon. Alfred John Mulholland. 

Arms of ROBINSON : Vert on a chevron, between three bucks trippant, 
Or, three cinquefoils, Gules. Of SPARROW : Ermine three white roses, 

1 His will is dated 3rd March, 1818. 



WORLINGHAM. 227 

seeded, Or. Of ACHESON : Argent, an eagle displayed with two heads 
Sable, beaked and incumbered, Or ; on a chief, Vert, two mullets, pierced 
of the chief. 

MANOR OF LITTLE WORLINGHAM. 

The lordship was possessed by Catherine Fitz-Osbert in 1281. She 
married Sir John Nojion or Noioun, to whom she carried this with other 
manors in Suffolk. 

The manor apparently passed in 1324 to their son and heir, John 
Noioun, living in 1340, and from him to his son and heir, John Noioun, 
who died in 1348, and from him to his son and heir, John Noioun, who died 
in 1361 without issue. 

In the reign of Edw. IV. the manor belonged to William Cove, and was 
sold by him to John Jernegan, of Worlingham Parva, who by his will dated 
1473 gave the same to his son, Osberne Jernegan, for life, and to his issue 
male, and in default to his eldest daughter, and in default to Elizabeth 
Denton his daughter, for life, and after that to Nat Denton her son for life, 
and after that to be sold. 

The manor apparently passed to Sir Edward Jernegan, Knt., who 
died in 1515, the son and heir of Sir John, 1 but, as Suckling observes, the 
lordship was always of very inconsiderable extent, and exercising, in the 
days in which he wrote, no manorial rights, might be considered as lost. 2 

Arms of FITZ-OSBERT : Gules, 3 bars gemelles Or. Of NOIOUN : 
Gules, a cross engrailed, and a canton Arg. 



The following places we have not been able to identify with certainty : 

CATESFELLA. 

A holding in this place at the time of the Confessor was that of five 
freemen, two being under commendation to Edric of Laxfield, and three 
under Uluric. It consisted of 30 acres and 2 ploughteams (reduced to i 
at the time of the Survey), valued at 55. The Domesday tenant was 
Roger de Poictou. 3 

ICHEBURNA. 

The one holding here was a small one of Robert Malet, consisting of 
8 acres, valued at i6d., formerly the estate of a freeman. 4 

THICCKEBROM. 

There were two estates in this place mentioned in the Survey, both 
belonging at that time to Robert Malet. The first was held of him by 
Humfrey, and consisted of a freeman formerly under Edric of Laxfield's 
commendation, having 16 acres of land, valued at 2s. 5 

The second was formerly that of a freeman under commendation of 
Edric of Laxfield, consisting of 16 acres and a bordar, with half an acre. 
Valued in another Hundred. 6 

1 See Horham Jernegan Manor, in Hoxne 4 Dom. ii. 3276. 

Hundred. J Dom. ii. Ib. 

'Suckling, Hist, of Suff. vol. i. p. 105. 'Dom. ii. Ib. 
'Dom. ii. 348. 



228 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

THRANDESTUNA. 

The only estate mentioned in this place was held at the time of the 
Survey by Roger de Poictou, and formerly by three half-freemen under 
Edric's commendation. It consisted of 20 acres, valued at 40^.' 

WICHEDIS. 

Among the lands of Geoffrey de Magnaville at the time the Survey 
was taken was an acre in this place, valued at ^d. y formerly belonging to 
a freeman. 1 



'Dom. ii. "Dom. u. 



WILFORD HUNDRED 




jS in the Deanery to which it gives name and the Archdeaconry 
of Suffolk, extending about 12 miles southward from Debach 
to Woodbridge and along the eastern shores of the Deben 
to Bawdsey Haven and Hollesley Bay, in the German Ocean. 
It stretches about 8 miles along the sea coast between the 
mouths of the Deben and Orford Haven, but its northern 
parts decrease to less than 5 miles in breadth. The German 
Ocean forms its southern and eastern boundary, and the Hundreds of 
Plomesgate and Loes its northern, the River Deben its western boundaries. 
The central parts are sandy, and comprise some large open heaths. 

The fee of the Hundred is in the Crown, and the government in the 
Sheriff and his officers. It contains 33,357 acres, in 16 parishes and 38 
manors, as follows : 



Parishes. 



Manors. 



Parishes. 



Manors. 



Alderton 

Bawdsey 

Boulge 

Boyton .... 

Bredfield.... 

Bromeswell . . 
Capel St. 

Andrew 

Debach .... 

Hollesley .... 
Lowdham . . 
Melton . , 



Pettistree 



Alderton. 

Naunton's. 

Bo vine's. 

Peche's. 

Bawdsey. 

Bawdsey Antley al. 

Glovers. 
Boulge. 
Boyton or Boyton 

Hall. 

Bredfield. 
Windrevile's. 
Bromeswell. 

Capel St. Andrew. 

Debach Burgh. 

Bast Struttings. 

Hollesley. 

Caldwell Hall. 

Lowdham. 

Melton, now Melton 

with Ufford. 
Pettistree. 
Bing Hall. 
Davelers al. Bacon's. 



Ramsholt . 
Shottisham 

Sutton 



Ufford 



Wickham 
Market 



Ramsholt. 
Peyton Hall. 

Shottisham Hall. 
Talvies or Talvas. 

Sutton Hall. 

Stokerland. 

Woodhall. 

Fennhall. 

Pistries. 

Osmond's. 

Ufford. 

Sogenho. 

Ufford Sutton. 

Otley's. 

Kettleburgh Ufford. 

Wickham Market 
or Wickham 
Market with the 
Members. 

Harpole. 

Gelham or Gelham 
Hall. 




230 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

A IDE ETON. 

O manor here is mentioned in the Survey, but there were 
two or three estates enumerated amongst the possessions 
of Robert Malet. The most important was one which had 
formerly been held by 31 freemen in the Confessor's time 
under Edric's commendation. Over two and a half of 
these Godric, the predecessor of Suane, used to have com- 
mendation, but William Malet was later seised of them. 
At the time of the Survey 34 freemen held this estate under Robert Malet. 
It consisted of a carucate of land and 80 acres, and a bordar and a half, 
20 acres of meadow, and 6 ploughteams, which by the time of the Survey 
had been reduced to 5, when the value was loos, as against the former 
valuation of 405. There was also a church with 24 acres and an acre of 
meadow, valued at 35. 

A second estate consisted of 32 acres, i ploughteam, and half an acre 
of meadow, valued at ios., it having been formerly held by two freemen 
under commendation to Edric, when the value was but 45. This estate 
was held by Walter de Caen of Robert Malet. 

A third estate was of 12 acres, valued at 2s., formerly held by a freeman 
under commendation to Edric. A fourth was of 8 acres, valued at i6d., 
also formerly held by a freeman under the same commendation, and a 
fifth of I acre, also formerly held by a freeman under Edric.' 

The only other holding here was of 12 acres valued at 25., the estate 
of the Abbot of Ely. 8 

ALDERTON MANOR. 

By the time of Hen. III. there were certainly three separate manors 
in Alderton Alderton Hall Manor or Naunton Hall, Boville's, and the 
Manor of Pechys, and a little later we meet with Alderton Comitis or Earls 
Alderton Manor. The information obtainable as to these manors is 

extremely limited, and what is here given cannot be implicitly relied upon 
much is mere surmise. The Manor of Alderton Hall with Peches and 
Howes formerly belonged to the family of Bacon, who sold them to Sir 
Samuel Clarke, Bart., reserving the farm called Alderton Hall and the 
presentation to the living, by which sale the manor became separated from 
the other property. On the decease of the last baronet, Sir Arthur Clarke, 
these manors became the property of Nathaniel Borandish. 

The lordship of the place belonged probably in 1113 to William de 
Glanville, who married Beatrix de Sackville, and descended to their son, 
Sir Bartholomew de Glanville, Sheriff of Norfolk and Suffolk, and 
Governor of Orford Castle, who married Isabella de Berking. 

Their son, William de Glanville, Baron de Bromholm, succeeded to 
the lordship, but died seised in 1234, without issue, and was succeeded by 
his brother, Sir Geoffrey de Glanville, Baron de Bromholm, who married 
Margaret de la Haye, and left one son and five daughters. Their son, Geoffrey 
de Glanville, died without issue, leaving his five sisters coheirs. This no 
doubt was the origin of the division of the manor. Agnes, one of the 
sisters, married Earl Baldwin, a Norman ; Emma was the wife of John de 
Grey ; Basilia is usually said to have married William de Bovil, but it is 
more probable that she married and left a daughter and heir Isabel, married 

'Dom. ii. 317, 318, 324*. *Dom. ii. 387. 



ALDERTON. 231 

to William de Bovil ; Elizabeth was the wife of Almaric Peche ; and Juliana, 
the 5th sister, is said to have married another Peche. Certainly in 1281 
we find they granted lands to Clement, son of Edmund Paston, and also to 
Laurence, son of Ralph de Reppes. The husband of Juliana seems to have 
been Sir Simon Peche, and their daughter Cecily married Walter, younger 
son of Edmund de Paston. The share or manor of Agnes, the eldest 
daughter, was seised into the King's hands by forfeiture as an escheat, and 
in 1320 Isabel, Queen of England, held it in dower. 

In 1330 John of Eltham, 2nd son of Edw. II., held the same by grant 
from the Crown, and on his death it reverted to the Crown. In 1428 
William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, was lord, and in 1537 Charles, Duke of 
Suffolk. Finally, it was granted by the Crown in 1550 to the Bishop of 
Norwich, where it has since continued. 

NAUNTON'S MANOR. 

The manor, which at a later period received the name Nauntons, was, 
on the death of Geoffrey de Glanville without issue, assigned to his sister 
Emma, the wife of Sir John de Grey, Sheriff of cos. Bucks, and Beds., 1239, 
Chief Justice of Chester, Constable of Dover Castle, 1258, &c., who died in 
1266. The manor seems to have passed to their daughter Emma, who 
carried it into the Huntingfield family, marrying William de Huntingfield, 
who died in 1264. It was probably given to Emma by her parents on her 
marriage, for we find their son and heir, Sir Roger de Huntingfield, lord in 
1264. Every tenant of the Crown was bound to furnish the King, on his 
going to war, with an armed soldier, and to maintain him in the field 40 
days for each knight's fee he held. This Sir Roger de Huntingfield having 
sent to the assistance of Hen. III., in Gascoign, his knight named De Gayzi, 
who performed such laudable service, the Sheriff of Suffolk had an order that 
the demand for 60 marks from him to the King should be excused. 

He seems to have died about 1313, and was succeeded by his son 
William. William de Huntingfield died the following year, leaving as 
his heir Roger, a minor, who is mentioned in 1330, with Alianore his wife, 
as holding of Queen Isabella as of the Honor of Eye, half a fee in Bacton, 
co. Norfolk. Alianore afterwards became a widow, and married Richard 
de Keleshull. 

BOVILLE'S MANOR. 

Basilia, the 3rd sister of Geoffrey de Glanville, left a daughter Isabel, who 
married, and had that portion of the Glanville's land in Alderton later known 
as Bovilles. In 1252 a fine was levied between John de Bovile and William 
de Bovile, sons of the above William, of this manor, whereby it was conveyed 
to William for life, remainder to John and his heirs, with remainder to the 
right heirs of William, which John was brother of William. 1 

The eldest son John died without issue, and was succeeded by his 
brother, William Boville, who married Isabel, daughter of - - Carbonel, 
who presented to the church of Alderton t. Edw. I. This William de 
Boville was constituted Keeper of the Peace in Suffolk by letters patent 
in 1264, and the next year was appointed the King's Justice Itinerant to 
enquire into misdemeanours in the County of Suffolk. 

1 See Badingham Manor, in Hoxne Hundred. 



232 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

In 1309 William, son of William de Boville and of Isabel his wife, 
was displeaded for the lordship by William de Huntingfield, descended from 
Emma, another sister and coheir of Geoffrey de Glanville, wife of John de 
Grey. 

There is an authority in 1313 for this William de Boville to retain the 
manor on granting other lands.' Davy states that Hugh de Naunton 
married Isabel, daughter and heir of William Boville, but his wife seems to 
have been an Eleanor, daughter and heir of Sir William Boville. The 
manor possibly passed through the Bovilles to the Latimers, but Davy 
states that it was held by Hugh de Naunton, and passed to Peter. He 
married Margaret, daughter of John Barney, of Gunton, and was succeeded 
by his son, Peter de Naunton, who married Margaret Doyley, aunt to Sir 
Henry Doyley, and Peter de Naunton was succeeded by his son and heir, 
Robert de Naunton, in the time of Hen. VI. and Edw. IV., who married a 
daughter of Tymperley, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Thomas de 
Naunton, who was living in 1498. He married ist Margery, daughter and 
heir of Roger Brusyard, and 2ndly Emma, daughter of Sir Thomas Tay, 
Knt., and on his death the manor passed to his son and heir, William de 
Naunton, who married Elizabeth, eldest daughter of Sir Anthony Wing- 
field, K.G., who sold this manor and also the Manor of Peches in 1547 to 
John Soone, son of John Soone, 1 who died in 1552, and was succeeded 
by his son and heir Francis, who died in 1562, and was succeeded by 
his son and heir John. John Soone held all three manors of Naunton 
Hall, Boville's, and Peche, and sold the same in 1589 to Sir James Bacon, 
Kt., 1 who died in 1618, and from him to the time of his great-grandson, 
Nathaniel Bacon, the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of 
Friston, in Plomesgate Hundred. 

Nathaniel Bacon's only daughter Mary married Hugh Chamberlain, 
physician to Queen Anne. On Hugh Chamberlain's death the manor 
descended in moieties to his three daughters (ultimately to the two married 
daughters Mary Anna Maria married to the Right Hon. Edward Hopkins ; 
and Charlotte married to Richard Luther, of Myles, co. Essex). One moiety 
continued in the Hopkins family, but was sold, and the other came to the 
two sisters and coheirs of John Luther, one married to Henry Fane and the 
other to John Taylor, and they sold. It subsequently passed to Sir Charles 
Egleton Kent, Bart., 4 then by purchase to Andrew Arcedeckne, of Glevering 
Hall, and ultimately to Mr. Barnardiston. All the three manors or a part 
seem to have been for some time in the Naunton family. Hugh de Naunton 
and Aliana his wife had a fourth of the Manor of Alderton in 1310, and their 
son Hugh in 1352. 5 About 200 years later the 3rd daughter of Sir Anthony 
\Vingfield married a Naunton. 

PECHE'S MANOR. 

The 4th sister of Geoffrey de Glanville, Elizabeth or Alianore, married 
Almaric Peche, and received as her portion of the Glanville inheritance 
in Alderton the manor henceforth called after her husband " Peche's 
Manor." He died in 1288, and was succeeded by his son and heir, Edmund 
Peche, who was succeeded by his son and heir Thomas, who was succeeded 

1 1.Q.D., 7 Edw. II. File 98 (8). 4 See Lackford Manor, in Thingoe Hundred. 

'Fine, Easter, I Edw., VI. 'Feet of Fines, 26 Edw. III. 4. 

'Fine, Mich. 31-32 Eliz. 



ALDERTON. 233 

by his son and heir, Thomas Peche, in 1311. We do not find any account 
of this manor again until 1428, when Peter de Naunton was lord. In 1552 
the manor was owned by John Soone,' son of John Soone, who was succeeded 
by his son and heir Francis, who died in 1562, and was succeeded by his son 
and heir John. The manor since seems to have devolved in the same line 
as Boville's. 

A survey of Alderton Manor in 1641 will be found amongst the MSS. 
in the Cambridge University Library/ and Court Rolls in the Public Record 
Office. 3 

A Manor of Alderton was vested in Sir John de Norwich and formed 
part of the endowment of the College of Raveningham. 4 We also find an 
" Alderton Howes Manor " the subject of a Chancery suit in 1445-6 between 
John Framlyngham, Esq., and Margaret his wife, daughter of William 
Waller, and John Cress, feoffee of the said William. This suit referred also 
to lands in Alderton, Bawdsey, and Hollesley. 5 

An advertisement appeared in 1822 of the sale of the " freehold estate " 
comprising the Manor or reputed Manor of Alderton Hall, a good dwelling- 
house and bailiff's house, suitable barn, stables and outbuildings, cottages 
for workmen, and 755 acres o r. 39p. of arable meadow, woods, and plantations. 
The sale was announced for the igth June, 1822. 6 



' See Chillesford, in Plomesgate Hundred. 4 See Manor of Mettingham Castle, in 

*W.M. II. 19 (2314). Wangford Hundred. 

Portfolio, 203, 81. 'E.C.P. Bundle 16, 166. 

6 Ipswich Journal, 1st June, 1822. 

FI 




234 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BAWDSEY. 

N Edward the Confessor's time the only manor here was that 
held with 62 acres by 14 freemen under Godric's commenda- 
tion. There were I bordar, 3 ploughteams (by Norman 
times reduced to 2), 2 acres of land, valued at 305. This 
was held by Ralph de Bellafago as the Domesday tenant 
in chief.' The Manor of Bawdsey as subsequently subsisting 
does not consist of this alone ; it included no doubt part of the 
land in Bawdsey, of which Robert Malet was tenant in chief and which was held 
by Robert de Glanville of him. This consisted of i carucate of land, 3 
bordars, and 2 ploughteams, valued at 405. It had formerly had but I 
ploughteam and a half, and had been valued at 255. only. It was a 
league long and 5 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 2jd. Also 60 acres 
of land held by 17 freemen in the Confessor's time under Edric's commenda- 
tion, and which formerly had 3 ploughteams, but then only a team and a 
half and 4 acres of meadow, of the total value formerly of ios., but then 
of I2s. And also the 72 acres of land held by 12 freemen and a half under 
the same commendation in the Confessor's days to which belonged 2 plough- 
teams and i acre of meadow, and which was formerly valued at I2s., but 
then at 305., and to which pertained a church with 20 acres, valued at 35. 
This last Robert Malet 's mother held of Robert Malet, who was the tenant 
in chief.' Robert Malet .also had 13 acres included in the valuation of 
Hollesley which had formerly been held by two freemen under Edric's 
commendation. 3 

BAWDSEY MANOR. 

The manor passed on the death of the Domesday tenant to his daughter 
Agnes, who married Hubert de Ric, and in the time of Hen. II. came to 
Ranulph de Glanville, the Chief Justice, and passed to his three daughters- 
Maud, who married William de Auberville ; Annabel, who married Thomas 
de Arderne ; and Helwisa, who married Robert Fitz Ralph, Lord of Middle- 
ham. In 1195 Thomas Arderne and Ralph, son of Robert, interpleaded 
Sir William de Umberville and Matilda his wife for their possession of the 
inheritance of Ranulph de Glanville in this lordship. Like proceedings 
were evidently continued in the next reign, for on the Abbreviation of 
Pleas in the time of John, we meet with proceedings by Ralph, son of Robert, 
on behalf of Thomas de Arderne and Ranulph de Auberville and Matilda de 
Auberville, claiming half a knight's fee in Bawdsey from Peter de Pecco, on 
the ground that it came to them through Ranulph de Glanville. 4 

Thomas de Arderne, son of Sir Ralph, is said to have given " his moiety " 
of the manor to Butley Priory, but it probably was his grandson, Sir Ralph 
de Arderne, who did this. It evidently had been divided between two 
of the daughters of the Lord Chief Justice, and the moiety not vested in 
Butley Priory became the inheritance of Robert de Ufford, who had married 
Sarah, sole heir of Sir William de Vescy, who had married Maud, 
heir of Sir Ralph de Glanville son and heir of Gilbert de Glanville, 
son of William, said to have been a son of Ranulph, the Lord Chief Justice, 

'Dom. ii. 354. 4 Abbr. of PI. fragmenta in the time of 

*Dom. ii. 317, 3176. John, 4. 



BAWDSEY. 235 

but probably his nephew. This Robert de Ufford was a son of John de 
Peyton, who assumed the name of Ufford from his lordship. 1 

There is a statement on the Rolls of Parliament in 1290 that Robert 
de Ufford and the Priory of Butley held this manor, 2 which is justified by 
the above facts. 

This Robert de Ufford was Justice of Ireland in the time of Hen. III. 
and again in the reign of Edw. I. He died in 1298, and was succeeded by 
his son, Sir Robert de Ufford, Knt., who was summoned to Parliament 
from 1308 to 1311 as a Baron. He was employed in the expedition made 
into Scotland by Edw. I. in 1306, and married Cecily de Valerius, daughter 
of Robert, Lord Valerius, and dying in 1316 she had this manor as part of 
her dower. 3 There is an order on the Close Rolls to deliver to Cecily, late 
wife of Robert de Ufford, tenant in chief, this manor which the King had 
assigned to her in dower of the yearly rent of 18. 135. 4^.* 

Robert's son Robert was created Earl of Suffolk in 1337. He was in 
the wars of Gascony in the reign of Edw. II., and in the early part of the 
following reign received numerous grants of lands for his eminent services, 
including a grant for life of the town and castle of Orford. He was asso- 
ciated with William de Bohun, Earl of Northampton, and John Darcy, 
Steward of the King's Household, to treat with David Bruce, of Scotland, 
touching a league of peace and amity, and became Admiral of the King's 
whole fleet northward, crowning his military achievements by his personal 
gallantry at the great battle of Poictiers, after which he was made a Knight 
of the Garter. He married Margaret, daughter of Sir John Norwich, and 
died in 1369. By his will in 1368 amongst other bequests he leaves to his 
son William " the sword wherewith the King girt him when he created 
him Earl, as also his bed with the eagle entire, and his summer vestment, 
powdered with leopards." He left one surviving son and three daughters. 
William, 2nd Earl of Suffolk, succeeded his father, and like him was a 
soldier, being engaged in the French wars towards the end of Edward the 
III.'s reign. He was also like his father made Admiral of the King's whole 
fleet northward. He married ist Joan, daughter of Edward de Montacute 
and granddaughter maternally of Thomas de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, 
and 2ndly Isabel (?), daughter of Thomas de Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, 
and widow of John le Strange, of Blackmere, but dying suddenly in 1382 
leaving no issue, 5 his estates passed, subject to the interest of the deceased 
Earl's widow, to his sisters and coheirs Cecily, married to John, 3rd Lord 
Willoughby de Eresby ; Catherine, married to Robert, Lord Scales ; and 
Margaret, married to William, Lord Ferrers, of Groby, this manor vesting 
in Robert de Willoughby, 4th Baron, son of John, 3rd Baron, and Cecily 
de Ufford his wife. 

There is a fine in 1368 levied by Sir Ralph Hemenhale and others v. 
Robert de Ufford, of Gifford, of this and other manors. 6 

Robert, 4th Lord Willoughby D' Eresby, died in 1389, and was succeeded 
by William, 5th Baron, and amongst the Harleian Charters in the British 
Museum we find a deed by which Sir William Phelippe, Sir Thomas de 
Wroxham, Robert de Asshefeld, and Henry Sergeaunt constitute Henry 

'See Parham Hall Manor, in Plomesgate 4 Close Rolls, 10 Edw. II. 20. 

Hundred. 'William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk and 

* R. of Parl. i. 53. Joan his wife. I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 57. 

3 Extent. Robt. de Ufford and Cecilia his "Feet of Fines, 42 Edw. III. 38. 

wife. I.P.M., 10 Edw. II. 76. 



236 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Lesingham, John Bernard of Ipswich, and John Burghard to deliver 
seisin to the said Sir William de Willoughby, Lord de Eresby, both of this 
manor and the Manor of Combs. The deed is dated at Bawdsey die Dom. 
prox. post fest. S. Valentine, i Hen. IV. [1400].' William, 5th Baron de 
Eresby, died in 1409, and was succeeded by his son Robert, 6th Baron, 
and amongst the Harleian Charters we find a writing by which this Robert 
constitutes Henry Hevyngham, Adam Fraunceys, Walter Resely and 
William Wright to deliver seisin of this and the Manors of Parham, Brad- 
field (? Bredneld), Ufford, Orford, Combes, Bawdsey, and Wykes Ufford 
to Sir William Tirwhit, John Kyme, of Fryskenay, co. Lincoln, William 
Restone, Serjeant, Richard Yerburgh of Yerburgh, Thomas Ward, and 
others. It is dated ist Jan. 7 Hen. VI. [1429].' The following year we 
find amongst the same Charters an indenture by which Sir William 
Tyrwhite, William Pastone, John Kyme, John Wyles, Richard Yerdeburgh, 
and John Preston granted to Sir William Oldhalle and Margaret his wife, 
sister of the said Robert, for their lives an annuity of 40 out of this and 
other manors including those of Ufford, Wykes Ufford, Bredneld, and Combs. 
The deed is dated ist Jan. 1430. 3 There is also another deed in 1434 
by which Sir Henry Bromflet and Joan his wife, Duchess of York, 4 demised 
to Sir William Tirwhit, Knt., John Kyme, Richard Yerburghe, John Wiles, 
Robert Form, and Henry Lesyngham this and various other manors, 
including those of "Beadfeld" (probably Bredneld) Combes and Wykes 
Ufford for the life of the said Duchess. The deed is dated 24th Jan. 12 
Hen. VI. [1434]- 

A survey of the manor by W. Fulbourne, made in 1437-8, will be found 
amongst the Additional MSS. in the British Museum, 5 where also is an 
extent of the manor made in 1474 and a survey made in 1570. 6 

From Robert Willoughby, 4th Baron, the manor passed in the same 
course as the Manor of Parham, in Plomesgate Hundred, to the death of 
Sir Robert de Willoughby in 14677 he, however, never having had actually 
enjoyment of the estate, as this was held by Cecily his mother, 2nd daughter 
of Leo, Lord Welles, until her death in 1480.* 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of William, 
5th Baron, who died in 1410,' of his widow Joan, who died in 1434,' also 
mentioned on death of Joan's 3rd husband, Lord Scrope, in 1415," and of 
Sir Robert Willoughby, who died in 1465." 

Margaret, the widow of Christopher Willoughby, died seised of the 
manor loth May, 1515. l3 

The manor then passed to Sir Robert's 2nd son, Sir Christopher, who 
married Margaret, daughter of Sir William Jenney, of Knottishall, and had 
issue William, who ultimately became gth Lord Willoughby, and died in 
1525, leaving an only daughter Katherine, Baroness Willoughby de Eresby,' 4 

'Harl. 54 H. 2. IO I.P.M., 12 Hen. VI. 43. 

'Harl. 58 B. 17. " I.P.M., 3 Hen. V. 55. 

s Harl. 57 A i. "I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 35. 

4 Widow of Edward Plantagenet, Duke of 'Jl.P.M., 6th Oct. 1515. 

York. '<The Davy MSS. state that the manor 

5 Add. MSS. 23948. passed on the death of William, gth 
'Add. MSS. 32134. Lord Willoughby, to his brother 
7 I.P.M., 7 Edw. IV. 37. George for life, and afterwards to 
* I.P.M., 20 Edw. IV. 14. his widow Anastasia. 

9 1. P.M., ii Hen. IV. 29, as of Manor of 
Benhall. 



BAWDSE\. 



237 



who married ist Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, brother-in-law of 
King Hen. VIII., and zndly Richard Berbe. 

In 1536 the manor was acquired by Sir Thomas Russhe, 1 and in 1555 
it belonged to his great-grandson, Anthony Rushe, from whom it was 
acquired in 1558 by Robert Bedyngfeld/ against whom a fine was levied 
in 1574 by John Beetes. 3 In 1629 the manor belonged to William Hum- 
berston, who died this year, when he was succeeded by his son, Charles 
Humberston. Charles left a daughter, married to Edmund Shepperd, of 
Mendlesham, to whom the manor went, and then to John Shepperd, of 
Ash, who died in 1793. He was succeeded by his son, John Shepperd, 
of Ash, who died in 1824, an d was succeeded by his son, John Wilson 
Shepperd, who died in 1830, when the manor vested in his son and heir, 
John Shepperd. 4 Finally the manor was acquired by Sir William Cuth- 
bert Quilter, Bart., M.P., D.L., J.P., who is now the owner and lord. Sir 
William is the eldest son of the late William Quilter, of Park Lane, by 
Elizabeth Hariot, 2nd daughter of Thomas Cuthbert, and grandson of 
Samuel Sacker Quilter, of Felixstowe. In 1867 he married Mary, 2nd 
daughter of the late John Wheeley Bevington, of Brighton. 

BAWDSEY ANTLEY al. GLOVER'S MANOR. 

This was the name by which the moiety of the original Manor of 
Bawdsey became known when taken by Anabel, daughter of Ranulph de 
Glanville, and her husband, Ralph de Arderne, as the moiety taken by 
Helewise, another daughter of Glanville, became known as Bawdsey 
Willoughby Manor. Ralph de Arderne, the grandson of Anabel, gave this 
moiety to the Priory of Butley, and from 1275 to 1538 that house held the 
same. It passed to the Crown under a fine levied in Easter Term 30 Hen. 
VIII. It apparently remained in the Crown till about 1609, when it is 
found vested in William Humberston, 5 who died in 1629, and was succeeded 
by his son and heir, Charles Humberston. In 1645 it was vested in William 
Glover. 



1 SeeManorof Kirkley, in Mutford Hundred. 

Fine, Sir Thomas Russhe and John 
Golder and others, Mich. 28 Hen. 
VIII. 

2 Fine, Hil. 5 Mary I. 

3 Fine, Trin. 16 Efiz. 

See Manor of Morehall, in Campsey, in 
Loes Hundred. 



'Is this William Humberston, of Hales 
Hall, in Lodne, Norf., son of Henry 
Humberston and Anne his ist wife, 
daughter of Gyles Bladwell, of 
Thurlow Magna, which Henry was 
son of Henry, son of William by 
Joan his wife, daughter of John 
of Lanham, son of John Hum- 
berston, of Lodne, and who married 
Mildred, daughter of Charles Walde- 
grave, of Stanningfield ? 




238 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BOULGE. 

HERE was no manor in this place in Saxon times, but 
several small holdings. One was amongst the lands of 
the Countess of Albamarle at the time of the Survey, and 
consisted of half an acre, valued at 2d., formerly held by a 
freeman. 1 

Two others were those of Geoffrey de Magnaville. One 
consisted of 16 acres, and i ploughteam (reduced at the time 
of the Survey to 2 oxen), valued at 2s. This had been held in the time of 
the Confessor by a freeman under commendation of Haldein, and the 
other of 6 acres valued at I2d., which had belonged to a freeman under 
Haldein's commendation Uluric.' 

Among the lands of Earl Alan were 29 acres and half a ploughteam in 
this place, lormerly held by two freemen under Amand's commendation, 
and included in the valuation of Soham. 3 

Among the lands of Robert Malet were two holdings. The first was 
that of a priest Ulfwin, with a church of 25 acres, 3 bordars, and an acre 
of meadow, valued at 35. 2d., and with a church in Bredfeld with 36 acres, 
valued at 35. 

These were held by Robert de Glanville of Robert Malet. The second 
consisted of 3^ acres valued at 6d., held formerly by a freeman and a half 
under Edric's commendation. At the time of the Survey Gilbert de 
Wishant held this of Robert Malet. 4 

A small holding among the lands of Roger de Poictou consisted of 6 
acres, valued at 12^.' 

William de Warren had an estate in this place consisting of 13 acres 
and half a ploughteam, valued at 2s., held of him by Robert. It had been 
held in the Confessor's time by a freeman under Ailric's commendation. 6 

Another holding in this place was that of Hervey de Berri, and consisted 
of 5 perches of land, valued at 4^., formerly in the possession of a freeman 
under commendation of Edric the Grim. 7 

Ralph, brother of Ilger, also held here in Domesday times a villein 
tenant named Uluric with 4 acres. 8 

BOULGE MANOR. 

This manor is said by Davy and others to have belonged to Odo de 
Campania at the time of the Domesday Survey, but we are inclined rather 
to the view that Robert Malet was at that time the chief lord here. By 
the time of Hen. III. the manor had passed to the Bovilles, and we meet 
with a fine levied in 1267 by Geoffrey de Asheby and Matilda his wife against 
William de Boville of part of the manor.' 

On the Patent Rolls we find notice of an action in 1272 between 
Matilda de Wraham and William de Boville touching a tenement in Boulge, 
Dallinghoo, and Debach. 10 

1 Dom. ii. 431. 'Dora. ii. 4006. 

Dom. ii. 4116. 7 Dom. ii. 443. 

1 Dom. ii. 2936. 'Dom. ii. 425. 

4 Dom. ii. 319, 3246. 9 Feet of Fines, 51 Hen. III. 46. 

5 Dom. ii. 3476. I0 Pat. Rolls, i Edw. I. igd. 



BOULGE. 239 

By 1281 the manor with the lordship of Debach was held by Queen 
Margaret, but in the same reign again passed to the Bovilles in the person 
of Sir John Boville, on whose death he was succeeded by his brother 
William. 1 

In 1313 we meet with a fine levied of the manor with the advowson of 
the church by William de Boville against John de Catefeld and Adam his 
brother. 2 

A little later it passed to the Seckford family, and Sir John de Sekeford 
had free warren in it in 1334. 3 He was succeeded by his son, Sir George 
Seckford, and there is a fine of the manor and advowson in 1396 levied by 
Sir George Felbrigge, Sir Simon Felbrigge, Sir Thomas Jeney, Sir John 
Jeney, John Stanterton, and Roger Cavyndyssh against this Sir George 
Seckford. 4 

From this time to the time of Dorothy, widow of Henry Seckford and 
daughter of Sir Henry North, the manor passed in the same course as the 
manor of Seckford Hall in Great Bealings, in Carlford Hundred. 

In 1602 Edward Pooley, assignee of Henry Seckford, was farmer of 
the Queen during the minority of Thomas Seckford, son and heir of Charles 
Seckford, and this year held a court. The ist September the following 
year, however, Thomas Seckford held his first court, and in 1611 Lady 
Anne Seckford, widow of the said Sir Thomas Seckford, and others held a 
court on behalf, and during the minority, of Thomas Seckford, son and heir 
of the said Sir Thomas. The I5th Jan. 1638, Dorothy, widow of Henry 
Seckford, held her first court. Dorothy, on her death in 1673, devised 
the manor i to her cousin, Sir Henry North, of Mildenhall, 2nd Bart. Sir 
Henry North died 5th July, 1695, unmarried. From the time of the death 
of Sir Henry North in 1695 to 1776, when this manor was vested in Henry 
William Bunbury, it passed in the same course as the Manor of Mildenhall, 
in Lackford Hundred. Sir Thomas Hanmer, Bart., and Sir Dudley 
Cullum, Bart., on the death of Thomas North, held their first court 2ist 
Dec. 1719, and Sir Thomas Hanmer alone 2ist Dec. 1722. 

In 1779 the lordship was vested in Thomas Emerson the younger and 
William Whiscop, who 25th Oct. this year held their first court, and in 
1790 in William Whitby, being in 1798 vested in Henry Short and Eleanor 
his wife (late Eleanor Whitby, widow.) 

The manor was shortly afterwards purchased by John Fitz Gerald, 
son of John Fitz Gerald, of Williamstown, co. Waterford. He married 
Mary, only daughter of Keane Fitz Gerald, of Totteridge, Herts., and had 
a son, John Charles, who married Louisa Danvers, and died without issue 
September, 1807, and a daughter, Mary Frances. John Fitz Gerald, 
High Sheriff for counties of Kent and Waterford, besides the family estates 
succeeded to estates in Staffordshire and Lancashire, under the will of his 
relation, Richard Fitz Gerald, who married a daughter and coheir with her 
sister Catherine, Countess of Fauconberg, of William Fowler, of St. Thomas's, 
co. Stafford. John Fitz Gerald died 6th Sept. 1818, when the manor 
passed to his only daughter, Mary Frances Fitz Gerald. She inherited a 
considerable portion of the fortune of her great-aunt, Mrs. Jane Joyce, who 
died in 1810, leaving property to the amount of between 600,000 and 
700,000. She married her first cousin, John Purcell, M.D., of Kilkenny, 

' See Badingham Manor, Hoxne Hundred. 3 Chart. Rolls, 8 Edw. II. 50. 
"Feet of Fines, 7 Fxlw. II. 35. "Feet of Fines, 20 Rich. II. 4. 



240 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

eldest son of John Purcell, of Dublin, by Eleanor, eldest daughter of John 
Fitz Gerald, of \\illiamstown. On the death of his wife's father he assumed 
by royal licence, dated 23rd Sept. 1818, the name and arms of Fitz Gerald, 
the latter being : arg. a saltire, gu, a mullet on a crescent for difference. 
He was a D.L. for the County of Suffolk, Lieut.-Col. of the 2nd East Suffolk 
Volunteers, and High Sheriff for the County in 1824. He represented 
Seaford in Parliament from 1826 until its disfranchisement under the Reform 
Bill, during part of which time he sat in conjunction with the Right Hon. 
George Canning. He died in London, i8th March, 1852, and his widow, 
the heiress, died at Brighton 3oth Jan. 1855, when the manor passed to 
her eldest son and heir, John Fitz Gerald, of the Little Island, co. Waterford, 
and of Boulge Hall, who assumed by royal licence in January, 1858, the 
additional surname and arms of Purcell, which latter were : arg. a saltire 
between four boars' heads, couped, sa. He married ist Augusta Jane 
Lisle, only daughter of Charles March Phillipps, of Garendon Park, and Grace 
Dieu Manor, co. Leicester, formerly M.P. for the Southern Division of 
that county, and 2ndly Hester, daughter of William Haddon. He died 
in 1879, and the manor passed to the executors of his will, who were lords 
of the manor in 1885, but seem to have sold before 1896, for that year we 
find the lordship vested in Robert Holmes White, of Boulge Hall, and the 
same is now held by his widow, who resides at the hall. 

Extracts from the Court Rolls in 1646 will be found amongst the 
Additional Charters in the British Museum.' 

The custom is the youngest son heir tenant by curtesy timber 
one-third value. 

A moiety of a Manor of Boulge was the subject of a fine levied i6th 
July, 1639, by Anthony Cage and Maria his wife. 



1 Add. Ch. 10251. ' Fine, 15 Car. I. pt. i, 33. (?) 




BOYTON. 241 



BOYTON. 

JT formed part of the great Malet fee, in the time of Edward 
the Confessor. Stanwin, under commendation to Edric, 
held in Boyton 2 carucates of land as a manor. There were 
3 villeins, 18 bordars, 2 ploughteams in demesne, 4 plough- 
teams belonging to the men, 10 acres of meadow, 2 rouncies, 
9 beasts, 24 hogs, 300 sheep, and i mill, the whole valued 
at 6os. Also a church with 8 acres, valued at izd. By 
the time of the Great Survey the details of the manor had altered, but the 
value was the same. The villeins had disappeared, the bordars were 
reduced by 3, the demesne ploughteams had come down to i, and but one of 
the men remained, though it is true the Survey adds, there might be more ; 
there were no rouncies remaining, 8 of the 9 beasts had gone, the hogs had 
come down to 17, and the sheep to 70. The manor was then held by 
Humfrey, son of Robert, of Robert Malet, the Domesday tenant. 1 Robert 
Malet also had here 63 acres, which had belonged to eight freemen under 
Stanwin's commendation. There had formerly been 2 ploughteams, 
when the value was 245., but at the time of the Survey but ij teams, when 
the value of the estate was 22s." 

BOYTON OR BOYTON HALL MANOR. 

Page informs us that in the 9th Edw. I. this was the lordship of Sir 
Simon de Rattlesden, but he is evidently confused with another Boyton 
Manor. 

The manor and advowson belonged for some time to Butley Priory. 3 
At the Dissolution the manor vested in the Crown by a fine levied in 1538,* 
and Queen Anne of Cleves had the benefit of the rents for some time, 
but in 1545 King Hen. VIII. granted the reversion of the manor and 
advowson to William Fourth (Forth) and Richard Moryson.' 

On William Forth's death the manor vested in his son and heir, Robert 
Forth, who died in 1601, from which time the manor for seven generations 
passed in the same course as the Manor of Butley, in Loes Hundred. 
Towards the close of the I7th century the manor vested in Edmund Warner, 
of Parham, and on his death in 1696 passed to his son and heir Edmund, 
who dying in 1721 without issue the manor vested in his sister and heir, 
Mary Warner, who gave the same to trustees to charitable uses, viz., a 
small part to be appropriated to the poor of Parham, another part of it 
to the endowment of a school at Stradbrook ; the chief part to the endow- 
ment of an almshouse at Boyton, and the overplus for the relief of insolvent 
debtors in Suffolk. 

Mr. Kir by gives some account of the foundation and endowment of 
Warner's almshouse in this parish, the revenues of which have greatly 
increased since his time ; so much so that the trustees were by the time 
Page wrote in 1847 enabled to augment the number of inmates to 16, and 
now accommodation is afforded to 12 poor men and 12 poor women. 

' Dom. ii. 3186. Fine, Easter, 30 Hen. VIII. 

'/&. 5 O. 37 Hen. VIII. 4 Pars. Rot. 3. 

3 Adam de Hautboys and others for Butley 
Priory. I.P.M., 39 Edw. III. 31. 

G I 



24-J THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. . 

By the last scheme approved by the Court of Chancery the petitioners 
proposed to increase the annual sum of 10 to the master of the charity 
school at Stradbrook to 15 ; and to increase the allowance to each of the 
12 poor persons in the almshouse at Boyton to 75. a week ; and to allow 
them 2. 55. each per annum for firing ; 2. 155. a year each for clothing ; 
the nurse who attends upon them to have the same allowance. It was 
further proposed to add four poor persons (two men and two women) to 
the then number of 12, and to put them on the same footing in every respect 
with the 12, with divers additional expenditures consequent upon that 
increase, such as the erection of new, or enlarging the present, almshouse. 

The Master was of opinion that the said scheme was proper to be 
carried into effect, and that the said increased allowances should commence 
from the loth of October, 1802. The inmates have now 8s. each weekly, 
the rector is chaplain and paymaster at a salary of 45 yearly. 

The indenture of bargain and sale enrolled in Chancery for the endow- 
ment of this charity, bears date 22nd June, 1736. Mrs. Mary Warner, 
of this parish, died in or about 1743, when the almshouses were erected. 1 

Lord Rendlesham is the present Lord of the Manor. 



1 Page, Hist, of Stiff, p. 145. 




BREDFIELD. 243 

BREDFIELD. 

HERE was in this place but one manor mentioned in the 
Domesday Survey, but about 18 other small holdings under 
six different tenants in chief of the King. The manor had 
in the time of the Confessor been held by Athelwold the 
priest under commendation to the Abbot of Ely. It con- 
sisted of 50 acres and i ploughteam, and under him were 
nine freemen with 41 acres having i ploughteam, but at the 
time of the Survey but half a team. It was included in the valuation of 
Kettleburgh, and Earl Alan was the Domesday tenant in chief. He also 
had here 26 acres which had been held by five freemen under Edric the Grim's 
commendation, except one who was under commendation to the Abbot of 
Ely. There was with this holding half a ploughteam. 1 

Robert Malet had three small holdings. One was held under him by 
Walter de Caen, and consisted of three whole freemen and three half free- 
men, and one quarter freeman valued at 6s. 2d. The Survey says : 
" And as to this Godwin of Sutton Menard makes claim that Earl Ralph 
was seised of him one year before he made forfeiture, and the Hundred 
bears witness that Robert Malet was seised thereof." 

The second was of 27 acres formerly with half a ploughteam, but at the 
time of the Survey none, valued at 35. 4^. These 27 acres had been formerly 
held by two freemen under Edric of Laxfield's commendation. And the 
third was held by Norman of Robert Malet, and consisted of a freeman 
under the Abbot of Ely's commendation holding 6 acres, valued at I2d* 

Roger Bigot had 4 acres and a half valued at I2d., which had been held 
by a freeman under Norman's commendation. 3 The Abbot of Ely had 
a number of small holdings. One was of three whole freemen and three 
half freemen and a quarter freeman with 24 acres, formerly having 2 plough- 
teams, but at the time of the Survey half a team only, valued at 6s. 2d., 
and this was held by Robert Malet of the abbot, who also had here a freeman 
named Farman with 12 acres in his soc and commendation valued at 2S. 

Another holding of the abbot was of three freemen under his com- 
mendation with 76 acres of land, formerly having 3 ploughteams, but at the 
time of the Survey only 2, and under them were three freemen with 5 
acres and half an acre of meadow, formerly valued at 155. but later at 205. 
Also 6 acres held of him by Hervey de Berri, but formerly held by Robert 
Malet's predecessor. There was also in the abbot's holding a church with 
31 acres of free land and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 55., and Harvey de 
Berri also held of the abbot two freemen under the abbot's commenda- 
tion, with 4 acres valued at I2d. 4 

Norman also held of Richard, son of Gilbert, 12 acres here and I villein, 
valued at 2s. ; 5 and Robert de Glanville held of William de Warren 3 acres 
valued at 6d., which had formerly been held by a freeman. 6 

The holding in chief of Hervey de Berri was more considerable than 
others here. It consisted of 80 acres, I bordar, i ploughteam, 2 rouncies, 
i beast, and 27 sheep, valued at 305. This had been valued at 2os. in the 
Confessor's time, when it had been held by Suarting under commendation 

'Dom. ii. 2936, 294. 4 Dom. ii. 387, 3876. 

*Dom. ii. 319, 3246, 325. 'Dom. ii. 39. 

'Dom. ii. 3436. 6 Dom. ii. 4006. 



244 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

to the predecessor of Robert Malet. In those days it had been a plough- 
team and a half . The Survey says : " It," probably meaning the township, 
" is a league and half a quarentene long and 6 quarentenes broad, and pays 
in a gelt 13^." Hervey also had a carucate and 22 acres of land, 3 plough- 
teams, and half an acre of meadow, valued at 305., which in the Confessor's 
time had been held by 21 freemen under Suarting's commendation, when 
there were as many as 4 ploughteams. And he also had 12 acres and half 
a ploughteam, valued at 25., which had been held by four freemen under 
commendation to one himself under commendation to Robert Malet's 
predecessor. Of this last holding William Malet was seised at the time 
of his death. Another 12 acres was held by a freeman under one Peter, 
who was under Hervey de Bern, with a team of 3 oxen and 23 sheep, valued 
at 2S. The freeman had formerly been under commendation of Durand 
of Offton, and lastly Hervey held 4 acres valued at 8^., which had been 
held by a freeman under commendation of Ailric, of Burgh.' 

BREDFIELD MANOR. 

The lordship belonged to the family of Peche 1 from an early date, 
probably before the time of King John. Amongst the " Abbreviation of 
Pleadings " of which fragments of the time of that monarch are still extant, 
we meet with a complaint made by Gilbert Peche against the Bishop of 
Norwich for having instituted the nominee of William de Glanvell to Bred- 
field church, while a suit was pending between the said Gilbert and the said 
William with regard to the title to the advowson. 3 In the time of Edw. I. 
the manor belonged to another Gilbert Peche, and was held of the King 
by knight's service. Peche seems to have sold or surrendered to the King, 
who granted to Stephen de Brokedissh, who died about 1307,' and whose 
wife Aubrey had an assignment of dower in the first year of Edw. II. 5 

There seems to have been some mistake as to the manor, and it is 
doubtful whether it had been granted as alleged in this entry on the Close 
Rolls, for a subsequent entry appears the same year 6 of an order not to 
intermeddle with lands held by Stephen de Brokedisshe at his death, of 
Bredfield Manor, it appearing by inquisition that he did not hold any lands 
in chief of the King, but that he held lands in Hacheston, Loudham, and 
Bredfield, which manor was assigned in dower to Margaret, Queen of 
England. This grant appears on the Patent Rolls in 1302. 7 

It is quite true that the author of the Magna Britannia states from his 
MS. that the lordship belonged to Margaret, Queen of England, in 1281 ; 
but, of course, this is an error, as Margaret was not married to Edw. I. 
until many years after this. The manor was, with the Manor of Dalham, 
granted by Edw. II. to Queen Margaret in lieu of other lands in 1308, for 
there is a grant to this effect on the Patent Rolls this year. 8 

In 1317 the King granted the reversion of the manor then held by 
Queen Margaret for life, and also the Manor of Dalham, to Walter de Nor- 
wich,' a descendant of Geoffrey de Norwich, who flourished in the time 
of King John, rendering a rent of 40 a year. He (Walter) was one of the 

'Dom. ii. 4426, 443. 'Close Rolls, I Edw. II. 3. 

'See Manors of Dalham and Thurlow 7 Pat. Rolls, 31 Edw. I. 34, and 32 Edw. 

Magna, in Risbridge Hundred. I. 12. 

Abbr. of PI. fragments t. John, 2. "Pat. Rolls, 2 Edw. II. 15, 4. 

* I. P.M., i Edw. II. 57. 9 Originalia, 12 Edw. II. 12, 14; 13 Edw. II. 
'Close Rolls, i Edw. II. 5. i ; 14 Edw. II. 17. 



BREDFIELD. 



245 



Barons of the Exchequer in 1311, and held a first court for this manor in 
1317. In 1320, when Walter de Norwich was made Treasurer of the 
Exchequer, the King made to him a grant in fee of the manor and also of the 
Manor of Dalham, rendering a rent of 40.' 

He died in I326, 2 and was succeeded by his widow Katherine, who held 
the manor in dower and a first court in 1329. On her death the manor 
passed to their son, Sir John de Norwich, Knt., who was in the wars in 
Flanders and in Scotland in the time of Edw. III., and was summoned to 
Parliament as a Baron 1342 to 1360. There is an order on the Close Rolls 
to restore to Sir John all issues of the manor, as he did not hold in chief, 
but at a rent of 40 to the King. 3 

He held a court in 1340, and this year seems to have granted the 
reversion of the manor to his son, Walter de Norwich, and Margaret his 
wife expectant on the decease of his mother Katherine, the widow of Sir 
Walter de Norwich, for he and his wife received a pardon for the offence 
committed in consequence of the manor being held in chief. 4 The lawyers 
of these days seem to have had a doubt whether land was held in chief if 
held of the King at a substantial rent, for the Close Rolls in 1329 distinctly 
state that the manor was not held in chief but of the King at the rent of 
40, whereas the Patent Rolls of 1340 assert the manor to be held in chief. 
However this may be, this same year (1340) the King makes a fresh grant 
of the manor to Sir John de Norwich with the knights' fees pertaining 
to it. 5 

Walter, son of Sir John de Norwich, died in his father's lifetime, and 
was found to be seised at the time of his death of the manor, 6 leaving his 
widow Margaret surviving, and she held her first court in 1361. She died 
seised of the manor about I395, 7 the reversion having in the interim passed 
to Sir John de Norwich, son of Walter, who died without issue in 1374, 
when it passed to Katherine de Brews as mentioned in the account of 
Dalham Manor, in Risbridge Hundred, and then to Robert Willoughby, 
4th Baron Willoughby de Eresby. 8 From this time to the death of Margery 
or Maria Willoughby, widow of Sir Christopher, 8th Lord Willoughby, 
i6th May, 1515,' it passed in the same course as the Manor of Parham, in 
Plomesgate Hundred. On Margery or Maria's death the manor passed 
to Sir Christopher's son and heir William, Lord Willoughby de Eresby, 
and from him to his widow Mary. William Willoughby, nephew of the 
above-named William, Lord Willoughby, sold the manor in 1546 to Sir 
William Drury. 10 From him it passed in 1572 to William Drury, of 
Hawstead, afterwards Sir William. 

Sir William Drury died in 1589," when the manor passed to his widow, 
Lady Elizabeth Drury, in dower. She remarried Sir John Scott, Knt., 



1 Chart. Rolls, 14 Edw. II. 27. 
2 1. P.M., 3 Edw. III. 58. See Manor of 
Dalham, in Risbridge Hundred. 

3 Close Rolls, 3 Edw. III. 16 ; see also Close 

Rolls, 12 Edw. III. pt. ii. i. 

4 Pat. Rolls, 14 Edw. III. pt. iii. 7. 

5 Pat. Rolls, 14 Edw. III. pt. i. 21 ; see 

Deed of Sir John, 1340 ; Memoranda 
Rolls, 14 Edw. III. Pas. Rec. Rot. 

I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 3. 

'I.P.M., 19 Rich. II. 35. 

8 It is included in the deed of Katherine de 
Brewse of the 30th Nov. 1374, 



mentioned in the account of Dalham 
Manor, and a rent charge of 40 is 
granted out of this manor and 
others to William Oldhall and 
Margaret his wife, sister of Robert, 
Lord Willoughby, by deed dated ist 
Jan. 1430. (Harl. 57 A i ; see, too, 
58 B 17.) 
9 1.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 29 : see Harl. 52 B 10. 

10 Fine, Easter, 38 Hen. VIII. 

11 See Manor of Hawstead, in Thingoe 

Hundred. 



246 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

who held in right of his wife, and on her death in 1598 the manor went to 
the son and heir of Sir William Drury, namely, Sir Robert Drury, Knt., 
who held his first court 2nd May, 1599, and died in 1615. 

In 1602, however, the manor was purchased by Sir Anthony Wingfield 
of Sir Robert Drury, 1 and Sir Anthony held his first court for the manor 
22nd July this year. On his death in 1606 the manor passed to his widow, 
Ann Wingfield, in dower, and she held her first court 5th May, 1606. She 
remarried Thomas Clenche in 1613, and they held their first court 3Oth 
March, 1617. On her death about 1627 the manor went to Thomas 
Wingfield, the executor of the will of Sir Thomas Wingfield, brother of Sir 
Anthony, who held his first court i6th May, 1627. Sir Anthony Wingfield, 
Bart., son of Sir Thomas, held his first court 7th April, 1628, and died 3Oth 
July, 1638," when the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Richard \Ving- 
field, Bart. 

About 1659 the manor was purchased by Robert Marryott the elder, 
for igih April this year he held his first court. He made his will i8th 
Dec. 1663, and devised the Manors of Bredfield, Bredfield cum Winderville, 
Woodbridge, Hasketon, and Chelsworth to his son, Robert Marryott, in 
tail male, and in default of such issue the Manor of Bredfield and Bredfield 
cum Winderville to his cousin, John Marryott, of London, merchant taylor, 
son of his uncle, Edward Marryott, for life, then to James Marryott his son 
in tail male, and for want of such issue to his cousin, John Marryott, brother 
of James Marryott for life, and then in tail male, and for want of such issue 
to his daughter, Elizabeth Ireland, or her heirs, with remainder to his 
nephew, Robert Marryott. The Manor of Woodbridge Hasketon he devised 
in default of issue male of his son Robert to go to his heirs general with 
divers remainders over. The will was proved 25th June, 1670. 

The manor passed to the son and heir, Robert Marryott, who held 
his first court i6th Nov. 1665, and married ist Dorothy, sole daughter and 
heir of Stephen Keble, of Woodbridge, and 2ndly Anne, daughter and 
coheir of James Wythe, of Framsden. Robert Marryott the son, by his 
will dated 27th Dec. 1675, devised the Manor of Bredfield cum Winderville 
to Anne his wife, according to a settlement in jointure, and after her death 
to Margaret, his youngest daughter in tail male, and in default of male 
issue to his daughter, Dorothy Knight, in tail general, and in default of 
issue to his nephew, Francis Ireland, in fee. He also gave to his daughter 
Margaret his Manor of Hasketon al. Woodbridge Hasketon in tail general, 
and if his said daughter Margaret should die without issue, then to his 
said daughter Dorothy Knight. If both daughters should die without 
issue, he gave the Manor of Hasketon to his kinsman, John Todd, of Eye, 
glover, in fee. He died in 1675,* when the manor went to his widow Anne, 
who remarried Edward Mann, of Ipswich. Robert Marryott having left 
no male issue, and Dorothy, his only child by his first wife, having married 
Thomas Knight, of Bredfield and Woodbridge, and having died without 
issue, the manor passed under the will of Robert Marryott to his only 
daughter by his 2nd wife Margaret, married to Edward Jenney, of Campsey. 
Edmund Jenney died I7th Feb. 1694-5, and was succeeded by his eldest 
son, Arthur Jenney, of Woodbridge, who married in 1711 Mirabella, daughter 
of Henry Edgar, of Eye, and widow of Robert Burley, of Wisbech, but 
dying in 1729 was succeeded by his brother and heir, Edmund Jenney, who 

1 Fine, Easter, 44 Eliz. 'Will proved I5th June, 1676, P.C.C. 

I. P.M., at Ipswich, 7th Sept. 14 Car. 



BREDFIELD. 247 

died in 1745, when the manor passed to his son and heir, Edmund Jenney. 
He married Anne, daughter of Philip Broke, of Nacton, and died in 1801, 
and was buried in the parish church of Bredfield 2Qth Aug. that year, when 
the manor went to his widow Anne during life. She died igth Oct. 1821, 
aged 84, when it passed to the last lord's eldest son Edmund. In 1844 
Edward Jenney was lord, in 1855 William Jenney, in 1885 the manor had 
passed to John Richard Wood, of Woodbridge, and in 1896 to his trustees, 
to whom it still belongs. 

The manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John Boyvill in the time 
of Rich. II., 1 and there are conveyances, &c., of the manor amongst the 
Harleian Charters in the British Museum in 1374, 1429.* 

MANOR OF WINDERVILE'S. 

This manor belonged in 1298 to Robert de Ufford, and passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Bawdsey, in this Hundred, and Parham Manor, 
in Plomesgate Hundred, till the time of Sir \Villiam Willoughby. 

Amongst the Harleian Charters in the British Museum is an assurance 
i8th June, 8 Hen. VIII. [1516], from Sir Edmund Jenney, Knt., in execution 
of the last will of Sir Christopher Willoughby, Lord Willoughby D'Eresby, 
to Sir William Willoughby, Lord Willoughby D'Eresby, son of Christopher, 
of this manor. 3 

He in 1546 sold the manor to Sir William Drury.' and Sir Roger Drury 
in 1602 sold it to Sir Anthony Wingfield. 5 

There was apparently a manor, probably formed out of lands given to 
the Abbey of Campsey, known as Bredfield Campsey, which had an alternate 
right of presentation to the vicarage. For this manor John Wood held 
his first court nth March, 1808, but we have no further information 
respecting it. 



'I. P.M., 3 Rich. II. 3. Fine, Easter, 38 Hen. VIII. 

2 Harl. 47 B.M. ; Harl. 58 B. 17. 'Fine, Easter, 44 Eliz. 

J Harl. 52 B. 10. 




248 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

BROMESWELL. 

HERE was no manor in this place in Domesday times, but 
there were three tenants in chief holding land here. Earl Alan 
held 4 acres which had been formerly held by a freeman 
and a half under Edric the Grim's commendation. 1 

Robert Malet had a good many small tenancies. Walter 
de Caen held of him 8 acres and half a ploughteam, valued 
at i6d., formerly held by a freeman and a half under com- 
mendation. 

Gilbert de Colville held of Malet 26 acres and an acre and a half of 
meadow, and half a ploughteam, valued at 45., formerly held by four freemen 
and a half under Edric the Grim's commendation. Also Robert Malet had 6 
acres, valued at I2d. Hubert de Mont Canese held of Robert Malet 16 freemen 
who had formerly been under Edric's commendation, with 60 acres, I bordar, 
4 acres of meadow, and I ploughteam and a half, valued at 20s. In Saxon 
times there had been 2 ploughteams, and the value was then i6s. This 
Hubert also held of Malet 44 acres of land and 6 acres of meadow in the 
Staverton demesne, a freeman who had been under Edric's commendation 
holding 16 acres, valued at i6d., and a church with 6 acres valued at 6d* 
Robert Malet also held of the Abbot of Ely a freeman and a half under the 
abbot's commendation, with 8 acres and half a ploughteam, valued at i6d., 
and three freemen under the abbot's commendation, with 4 acres, valued 
at 2s. 

The abbot also held here two freemen in his commendation with 10 
acres of land, valued at I2d., and had upon his demesne a church with 16 
acres, valued at 2s. ; he also had four freemen under his commendation 
with 76 acres of land, 3 ploughteams, 4 acres of meadow, 2 rouncies, 6 hogs, 
and 57 sheep, valued at 2os. In Saxon times 4 ploughteams had belonged 
to this holding. 

The abbot also had here in Saxon times 70 freemen, from whom the 
abbot had commendation, soc, sac, and all customs, of whom the predecessor 
of Roger Bigot had commendation over one with 6 acres, and they had 2 
carucates of land, 16 acres, 12 ploughteams, and 3 acres of meadow, valued 
at 40$. By the time of the Domesday Survey the freemen were reduced in 
number to 45, and they were held by Hervey of the abbot, the ploughteams 
had come down half, whereas the value had gone up 6os. 

This Hervey also held of the abbot 22 acres, which had been held by 
two freemen under the abbot's commendation, with half an acre of meadow. 
In Saxon times there were attached to this holding 2 ploughteams, and the 
value was 45., whereas at the time of the Survey there was but half a team, 
and the value was 55. 3 

MANOR OF BROMESWELL. 

This manor belonged to William de Caniso, of Edwardstone, in the 
time of Edw. I., 4 though the author of the Magna Britannia states from his 
MS. that the Earl Marshal was lord in 1281. 

The manor was held by Roger le Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, in 1307, and 
by his widow Alice under grant from Edw. I. during her life, going to the 
Crown on her death about 1310. 

'Dom. ii. 293. J Dom. ii. 387, 3786. 

'Dom. ii. 318, 319, 3196, 324, 3246. 4 I.P.M., 14 Edw. I. 27. 



BROMESWELL. 249 

In 1314 the manor was granted by Edw. II. to Thomas de Brotherton, 
Earl of Norfolk, and passed on his death to his son Edward, Earl of Norfolk 
and Marshal of England, who, however, dying the same year, the manor 
went to his sister Margaret, Duchess of Norfolk, and from this time the 
manor appears to have descended in a like course with the Manor of 
Framlingham, in Loes Hundred. 

The manor was confirmed to the Duke of Norfolk by Act of Parliament 
in 1488,' and was included amongst the manors given by Thomas Howard, 
Duke of Norfolk, and Henry his son, Earl of Arundel and Surrey, in 1544, 
to that monarch in exchange for his castle, manor and chase of Rising, in 
Norfolk. The manor, however, was the subject of a fine levied in 1558 by 
Sir Edward Fynes, Lord Clynton, against Thomas, Duke of Norfolk. 2 

In 1609 the manor was vested in Sir Michael Stanhope, and passed on 
his death to his daughter and coheir Elizabeth, married to George, Lord 
Berkeley, who sold it to Sir Henry Wood, Knt., Treasurer of the Household 
of the Queen Dowager Henrietta, one of the Council of Queen Catherine 
and Clerk of the Board of Green Cloth, eldest son of Thomas Wood, of 
Hackney, in Middlesex, Clerk of the Pantry. He died in 1671. 

The devolution from this time to 1747 is the same as the Manor of 
Blythford, in Blything Hundred, and in the last-mentioned year this manor 
was on the partition there mentioned, and in the account of the Manor of 
Dunningworth, in Plomesgate Hundred, allotted to Robert Onely, and 
subsequently vested in Sir John Chapman. After his death without issue 
the manor passed by descent to William Morris, who sold the same to 
Edward Leedes, Master in Chancery. Edward Leedes devised the manor 
by his will in 1805 to Nathaniel Barnardiston. The manor is now joined 
with Staverton under the name of Staverton with Bromeswell, and has 
descended in the same course as the Manor of Alpheton, in Babergh 
Hundred. 

The Manor of Staverton with Bromeswell formed one of the manors 
bestowed by the Conqueror upon Robert Malet, and upon his disgrace 
became the property of Roger Bigot. In 1200 Hubert de Munchensi, 
or Montchansy, claimed it in right of his wife Muriell, daughter of Peter 
de Valoignes, and the right was again in dispute in 1225 between William 
of York, praepositus, of Beverley, and William de Munchanesi, son of 
Hubert, who with his family was killed by the fall of his castle in Wales. 
Staverton Park was sold in 1529 to the Prior and Convent of Butley by 
Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, and at the suppression of that house was given 
to William Forthe, of Hadleigh. In 1601 the park was the property of 
Sir Michael Stanhope, and passed upon his death to George, Lord Berkeley, 
in right of his wife Elizabeth, youngest daughter and coheir of Sir Michael 
Stanhope. 

Sir Henry Wood, Bart., held his firsL court as lord of Staverton cum 
Bromeswell Manor in 1669. The first court of the Duke of St. Albans and 
others was held in 1672, and the first court of Thomas, Bishop of Lichfield 
and Coventry, was held in 1681. The park and manor now belong to 
Col. Nathaniel Barnardiston, of the Ryes, Sudbury. 



1 R. of P. vi. 411, 1503; Ib. 529. 'Fine, Trin. 5 Mary I. 

H I 




250 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

CAPEL ST. ANDREW. 

HERE were several holdings in this place in Saxon times. 
The first was that of six freemen under commendation of 
Edric the Grim, and consisted of 41 acres, a bordar, and 
a ploughteam belonging to Earl Alan at the time of the 
Survey. 1 

The second, that of two freemen under Edric's com- 
mendation with 3 acres of land, and at the time of the Survey 
that of Robert Malet. 

The third estate was held also by Malet at the time of the Survey, and 
formerly by three freemen and a half under commendation to Godwin. 
This consisted of 15 acres of land and half a ploughteam (there had been a 
whole team in Saxon times). It was valued at 45., the prior Saxon valua- 
tion having been 2s. It was a league long and half a league broad, and paid 
in a gelt 2jd. Others held land here. Robert Malet had a third estate 
in this place at the time of the Survey, held of him by Walter, son of Aubrey, 
consisting of 24 freemen (formerly under commendation to Edric), with a 
carucate of land, 61 acres, 4 acres of meadow, and 3 ploughteams (there 
had been 6 in Saxon times). The value was 6os. There was also a church 
with 12 acres, valued at 2s* 

The next holding in this place was that of a freeman under Norman's 
commendation at the time of the Confessor, then consisting of 20 acres, a 
ploughteam (reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey), and half an 
acre of meadow, valued at 45. Over them at the time of the Survey Norman 
held of Roger Bigot. 3 

The next two estates were held at the time of the Survey by the Abbot 
of Ely. The first was formerly that of three freemen and a half under 
his commendation, consisting of 15 acres of land and a ploughteam, valued 
at 2s. When the Survey was taken there was only half a team, but the 
value had increased to 35. 4 

MANOR OF CAPEL ST. ANDREW. 

In 1310 Simon de Ratlesden owned the manor, and died seised in 1343. 
Page thinks it probable that Simon held the manor of the Valences, Earls 
of Pembroke, as he did Bokenham Ferry and Saxlingham, in Norfolk. 

In 1609 Sir William Forth, Knt., held the lordship. 

In 1885 the manor belonged to Lord Rendlesham, who still owns the 
same. 



'Dom. ii. 293. J Dom. ii. 3436. 

* Dom. ii. 317, 318, 319. * Dom. ii. 387. 




DEBACH. 251 

DEB AC H. 

OGER BIGOT had a small holding of 8 acres, valued at i6d., 
held by Sturstan, son of Widow, holding over a freeman 
and a half, formerly under Edric's commendation.' 

Roger de Poictou had 15 acres and an acre of meadow, 
valued at 35., held by two freemen and a half under Uluric's 
commendation. 2 

The Bishop of Bayeux had 15 acres here belonging to 
Charsfield, and a freeman with half an acre. 3 

William de Warren had four acres, valued at 8s., formerly held by a 
freeman under Ailric's commendation." 

Geoffrey de Magnaville had a freeman under commendation of one 
himself under commendation of Ralph the Staller, holding 6 acres, valued 
at I2d. s 

Ranulf Peverell held 15 acres belonging to Clopton, valued at 35.,' 
and the Countess of Albemarle had three freemen under commendation 
to Edric the Grim, with 20 acres, one acre of meadow with formerly a 
ploughteam, all valued at 35., and also a church with 8 acres, valued at i6d. 7 

MANOR OF DEBACH BURGH. 

Odo de Campania, Earl of Albemarle and Bishop of Bayeux, is said 
to have had a grant of this manor from the Conqueror, but no notice of 
it is in the Domesday Survey, nor is any manor mentioned in Debach. 
The Countess of Albemarle, wife of Odo, held the church and 8 acres of land. 
In 1316 the manor was held by Queen Margaret, and in 1329 Gilbert de 
Boulge was lord. 

A fine was levied of the manor in 1378 by John de Pykeshale, clerk, 
Henry le Serjeant, of Framlingham Castle, Gilbert de Boulge, and Simon 
Sygor against Sir John de Tanneye and Maria his wife. 8 

In the time of King Edw. IV. the manor was held by Sir John Wingfield, 
Knt., of Letheringham, who died in 1481,' and from this time to the time 
of Sir Richard Wingfield, 2nd Bart., the manor passed in the same way as 
the Manor of Dallinghoo, in Loes Hundred. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Anthony 
Wingfield, who died 2Oth August, 1552, leaving Robert his son and heir, 10 
and of Sir Anthony Wingfield, Bart., who died 3Oth July, 1638." We find 
that 27th Oct. 1626, the King by indenture of this date under the seal of 
the Court of Wards and Liveries, demised the manor to William Naunton 
during the minority of Anthony Wingfield, son and heir of Sir Thomas 
Wingfield, then of the age of two years. 

In 1672 the manor passed to Sir William Blois, Knt.," who died in 1675, 
when it passed to his son, Charles Blois, of Grundisburgh Hall, who was 
created a baronet I5th April, 1686, and removed to Cockfield Hall in 1693. 

1 Dom. ii. 3436. 'Feet of Fines, 2 Rich. II. 26. 

'Dom. ii. 3476. B I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 

3 Dom. ii. 3736. IO I.P.M. at Ipswich, i8th April, 7 Edw. VI. 

4 Dom. ii. 4006. 65. 

5 Dom. ii. 4116. " I. P.M. at Ipswich, 7th Sept. 14 Car. 
Dom. ii. 4176. "See Manor of Blythburgh, in Blything 
T Dom. ii. 431. Hundred. 



252 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The manor was next held by Sir Thomas Hanmer, Bart., 1 and then by 
the Rev. Sir William Bunbury, Bart. 

In 1756 the manor was held by William Thompson, and in 1784 by 
John Barnard, of Ipswich, a shipbuilder, who became bankrupt, and it 
was offered for sale by his assignees in Jan. and May, 1784.' 

Later it passed to the Reverend Osborne Shribb Reynolds. In 1885 
the Reverend F. Joplin was lord, and in 1896 the manor was held by the 
Rev. Ernest Henry Hume, by whom it is still held. 

An extent of this manor from a roll of parchment in the possession of 
Edmund Jenney, in 1811, is given in the Davy MSS., " Wilford Hundred," 
fol. 159. 

Court Rolls i and 2 Edw. III. will be found in the Public Record Office. 1 

MANOR OF BAST STRUTTINGS. 

Most of the site of this manor is in the parish of Boulge. Sir John 
Wingfield, Knt., held the lordship in the time of King Edw. IV., and it 
descended in the same course as the main Manor of Debach to the time of 
Sir Anthony Wingfield, ist Bart., who died in 1638. 

In 1806 it was vested in Thomas Corbett, and subsequently passed in 
the same way as the Manor of Shelton Hall, Stradbroke, in Hoxne Hundred, 
being included in the order of sale of the 6th May, 1876, there referred to. 



'Sec Manor of Mildcnhall, in Lackford * Ipswich Journal, I7th Jan. and ist May, 
Hundred. 1784. 

Portfolio, 203, 78. 



HOLLESLEY. 253 

HOLLESLEY. 




MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Edric of Laxfield. 
It consisted of 6 carucates of land, 18 villeins, 4 bordars, 
4 ploughteams in demesne and 8 belonging to the men. 
Also 30 acres of meadow, a fishery, 2 rouncies, 8 beasts, 
30 hogs, and 100 sheep. When the Survey was taken 
this manor was held by Robert Malet, who held the soc and 
sac of the King. There were then 13 villeins, 12 bordars, 
2 ploughteams in demesne, and there could be 2 others, and 5 belonging to 
the men. To the manor belonged 5 socmen with 56 acres, 2 ploughteams 
(reduced to i at the time of the Survey), and 4 acres of meadow. These 
five could not sell or give away their land. The value was formerly zoos., 
increased at the time of the Survey to I3/. It was a league long and half 
a league and a quarentene broad, and paid in a gelt jd. There was a 
church with 14 acres, valued at 2s. The soc throughout the entire Hundred 
belonged to the Abbot of Ely. 1 

There was also a mill in this place valued at I2s., held at the time of 
the Survey by Robert de Glanville of Robert Malet. 2 

Under the head " Culeslea " appears in the Survey an estate held of 
Robert Malet by his mother, consisting of a carucate and 80 acres of land, 
a villein, 13 bordars, 4 ploughteams in demesne (reduced to 2 at the time 
of the Survey), and 3 belonging to the men, and 6 acres of meadow, valued at 
6os. The hamlet was a league long and 6 quarentenes broad, and paid in 
a gelt 27 d. 3 

MANOR OF HOLLESLEY. 

This was the estate of Robert Malet at the time of the Great Survey, 
but before 1269 became vested in Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, who this 
year died seised of it. The manor descended through the Bigots, Thomas 
de Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk, the Mowbrays, and the Howards to the 
attainder and execution of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, in 1572, 
in the same course as the Manor of Framlingham, in Loes Hundred. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Roger le 
Bygod, Earl of Norfolk, in 1270, and an extent given of it with the advowson. 
It included also the market of Margritestonce, held of the King in chief as 
pertaining to the Barony of Bigot. 4 

The manor was forfeited to the Crown and held by Queen Elizabeth 
for the remainder of her life. In 1605, however, King Jas. I. granted the 
manor to Thomas, Earl of Suffolk, and Henry, Earl of Northampton, and 
they the same year sold it to Sir Michael Stanhope, of Sudbourne, Knt., 
on whose death it passed to his daughter and coheir Elizabeth, married to 
George, Lord Berkeley. Lord Berkeley sold the manor about 1671 to 
Sir Henry Wood, Bart., from whom it descended in the same course as the 
Manor of Blythford, in Blything Hundred, to 1747, when on the division 
of the estates of Sir Henry Wood under the partition there referred to, 
confirmed by indenture dated 5th Dec. 1747, this manor was allotted to 
Dorothea, daughter and heir of Elizabeth and John Chester, then an infant 
and afterwards wife of Sir George Robinson, Bart., M.P. for Northampton. 

Sir George Robinson, with his wife Dorothea and others, by deeds 
2Oth and 2ist March, 1770, sold the manor for 29,000 to Charles Kent, of 

'Dom. ii. 317. J Dom. ii. 3176. 

2 Dom. ii. 317. * I.P.M., 54 Hen. III. File 38 (17). 



254 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Fornham St. Geneveve in fee simple. In this deed the manor is styled 
" Hollesley-cum-Sutton." From this time to the death of Sir William 
Charles Egleton Kent, Bart., in 1841, the manor no doubt passed in the 
same course as the Manor of Lackford, in Thingoe Hundred. 

By 1896 the lordship passed to the Colonial College and Training 
Farms, Limited, by whom the same is now held. It is now, however, 
stated that the manor belongs to Lord Rendlesham and Major Algernon 
W. Cobbold, which seems doubtful. 

The manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Roger le 
Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, in 1270,' and in that of Roger le Bigot and Alicia 
his wife, and an extent given in 1306.* Also in that of William de Ufford, 
Earl of Suffolk, in 1376 ; 3 of Thomas, Duke of Norfolk, in 1400 ; 4 of John, 
Duke of Norfolk, in 1433 ; 5 of John, Duke of Norfolk and Eleanor his wife, 
in 1462 ;' and of John, Duke of Norfolk, in I478. 7 

Fines were levied of this manor in 1367 by Sir Ralph de Hemenhale, 
John de Harleston, clerk, Reginald de Eccles, and Hugh Bandun against 
William de Ufford, 8 and in 1371 by Roger de Wolferton and Henry 
Serjeaunt, of Parham, against William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, and Joan 
his wife. 9 The Receiver's Account of lands of Margaret, Countess of 
Norfolk, here in 1399-1400, will be found in the Record Office. 10 

A Court Roll of the manor is referred to in the Proceedings of the 
Society of Antiquaries.". 

A rental of the manor and a register of Court Leets and General, 1501 
to 1765, will be found amongst the Additional MSS. in the British 
Museum. 12 

MANOR OF CALDWELL HALL. 

This was vested in John Wingfield and passed to his son and heir, John 
Wingfield, who died in 1398, when he was succeeded by Sir Robert Wingfield, 
Knt., and Anne his wife. The manor passed to their son and heir, John 
Wingfield, who died in 1481,' 3 and then to his son and heir, Sir John 
Wingfield. 

In 1595 the manor apparently belonged to John Purpett, and this 
year a fine was levied of it against him and others by John Hurberd." In 
1835 the manor belonged to Robert Bartholp. 



'I.P.M., 54 Hen. III. 23. 
'I. P.M., 35 Edw. I. 46. 
M.P.M., 50 Edw. III. 29. 
'I.P.M., i Hen. IV. 710, 72. 
J I.P.M., n Hen. VI. 43. 
I.P.M., i Edw. IV. 46. 
7 I.P.M., 17 Edw. IV. 58. 
' Feet of Fines, 41 Edw. III. 2. 



Feet of Fines, 45 Edw. III. 45. 

10 23 Rich. II.-i Hen IV. Bundle 1121 

No. 4. 

" 2nd Ser. vol. iii. 260. 
"Add. 23949-23952. 
3 1.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 60. 
' Fine, Mich. 37 and 38 Eliz. 



LOUDHAM. 255 

LOUDHAM. 




MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Morewin, a freeman, 
and consisted of 40 acres (half under commendation of 
the Abbot of Ely and half under Edric), a bordar, and a 
ploughteam. Under him were 14 freemen with 40 acres, 
5 acres of meadow, and 2 ploughteams (reduced to i at the 
time of the Survey). When the Survey was taken Walter de 
Caen held this manor of Robert Malet. It was a league 
long and 7 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 27^. 

Robert Malet had several other holdings besides this manor in this 
place. The first was formerly that of 10 whole and two half freemen under 
Edric's commendation, and consisted of a carucate of land, 6 ploughteams 
(reduced by 3 at the time of the Survey), and 4 acres of meadow, valued 
formerly at 305., and at the time of the Survey at 405. 

The second was held of him by Walter, son of Aubrey, and formerly 
was held by 2 freemen under Edric's commendation, and consisted of 24 
acres, 4^ acres of meadow, a ploughteam (which was reduced to half at the 
time of the Survey), and a mill, valued at 20$. 

The third was formerly that of a freeman under Edric's commendation, 
consisting of 8 acres, valued at i6d. 

The fourth was formerly that of a freeman under Edric, consisting of 
8 acres included in the valuation of Dennington. 1 

At the time of the Survey there was an estate here belonging to Roger 
Bigot, formerly held by Turnold, a freeman under Edric's commendation, 
consisting of 7 acres and an acre of meadow, valued at i6d* 

Another holding here was that of the Abbot of Ely, formerly that of 
Morewin, a half freeman under the abbot's commendation, consisting of 
20 acres, half a bordar and half a ploughteam, and seven freemen under 
him with 20 acres, z\ acres of meadow, and a ploughteam (reduced to half 
a team at the time of the Survey). The value was ios. 3 

Gilbert, Bishop of Evreux, had a holding in this place, formerly that 
of 34 freemen, under commendation to Turnold (15 being under Edric's 
commendation and one under the Abbot of Ely's). It consisted of 120 
acres, and altogether they had i carucates of land. Also 6 ploughteams 
(reduced to 3 at the time of the Survey), and 6 acres of meadow, valued 
at 8. Also a church with 60 acres, valued at 55., several persons having 
shares therein. 4 

There were two more estates in this place, one being that of Hervey de 
Berri, formerly that of a half freeman under Swarting's commendation, 
consisting of 15 acres, valued at 2s, 5 the other being that of Earl Alan, 
formerly that of a freeman under Edric, consisting of 9 acres.' 

MANOR OF LOUDHAM. 

Loudham is a hamlet of Pettistree, but has a manor of its own. The 
lordship was held for many ages by the family of Loudham, and in 1301 a 
fine was levied of this manor by William de Ludham and John his son 
against William, parson of Wykham church. 7 

'Dom. ii. 3196, 3246, 325. 5 Dom. ii. 443. 

2 Dom. ii. 3436 (bis). 'Dom. ii. 2936. 

3 Dom. ii. 388. 7 Feet of Fines, 29 Edw. I. 31. 

4 Dom. ii. 3886. 



256 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

John de Loudham, son of the last John, died in 1356,' and Joan his 
wife was seised of the manor in 1372,' from which time to the death of George 
Blenerhasset, the i8th of February, 1543, leaving a daughter and heir 
Maria, 1 the manor passed in the same course as the Manor of Tuddenham, 
in Carlford Hundred. 

This manor is specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John Blener- 
hasset, who died 1509,' and of Thomas Blenerhasset, who died in 1531. 5 

The manor subsequently passed to Samuel Blenerhasset, and amongst 
the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth will be found an 
action by this Samuel Blenerhasset, then stated to be seised in fee of the 
manor, against Thomas Fuller, to enforce an agreement under which the 
defendant was to be permitted to dwell in the mansion house, rendering a 
certain rent. 4 

The manor was subsequently acquired by Sir Henry Wood, Knt., 
Treasurer of the Household of the Queen Dowager Henrietta, one of the 
Council of Queen Catherine, and Clerk of the Board of Green Cloth, eldest 
son of Thomas Wood, of Hackney, in Middlesex, Clerk of the Pantry. 
Sir Henry had the manor and park of Loudham and resided here, dying 
25th May, 1671, at the age of 74, from which time the manor descended in 
the same course as the Manor of Blythford, in Blything Hundred, to the 
time of the partition there referred to in 1747, when this manor was allotted 
to Susan, wife of Robert Oneby, whose son Robert died in 1753 without 
iue, and it became the inheritance of Sir John, son and heir of Sir William 
Chapman, Bart., by Elizabeth his wife, sister of Susan, wife of the said 
Robert Oneby. 7 The manor was purchased by Jacob Whitbread after 
the decease of the said Sir John Chapman, Bart., without issue. He does 
not seem to have acquired the manor until 1792-3, but it was offered for sale 
8th July, 1786, with the Manor of Ufford, and " the quit rents, fines, 
royalties of fishery for 4 miles in the River Deben, with the farms, &c., 
amounting to the yearly rent of 870. "" He was succeeded by Carey 
William Jacob Whitbread, from which time the manor has descended in 
the same course as the Manor of Ufford, in this Hundred, and is now vested 
in Colonel Howard Whitbread, C.B., D.L., J.P. 

Thomas Wood, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, held his first court 
2ist April, 1681, and Thomas Breton and others I3th April, 1786. An 
interesting trial at Bury before Sir W. H. Ashurst, Knt., and a special 
jury, as to Loudham Hall and estate worth 3,000 a year is reported in 
the Ipswich Journal, 23rd July, 1785. 

Arms of BLENERHASSET : Gules, a chevron, Ermine, between three 
dolphins embowed, Argent. 

We meet with mention of the manor in a fine levied in 1544 by John 
Culpeper and others against Thomas Culpeper and others. 9 In the time 
of Queen Elizabeth there are four fines of the manor the first in 1572, 
levied by William Paston against Henry Brampton and others ;' the second 
in 1573 by William Atwood and others against Francis Bacon and others ;" 

'I. P.M., 30 Edw. III. 19. 7 See Manor of Dunningworth.in Plomes- 
7 1. P.M., 46 Edw. III. 35. gate Hundred, and Staverton, in 

3 1.P.M., 36 Hen. VIII. Eyke, in Loes Hundred. 

I.P.M., 7 Hen. VIII. 33. Ipswich Journal, 24th June. 1786. 

5I.P.M., 33 Hen. VIII. 63. 'Fine, Mich. 36 Hen. VIII. 

6 C.P. i. 66. '"Fine, Trin. 14 Eliz. 

"Fine, Mich. 15 Eliz. 



LOUDHAM. 257 

the third in 1577 by Edmund Oskefeld and others against the said Francis 
Bacon and others ;' and the fourth in 1595 by Thomas Sickemore against 
Edmund Byell and others.* 

In the time of King Edw. II. we meet with a manor called " Parva 
Lowdham." It is in an action which Robert le Poer and Alice his wife 
brought in 1299 in respect of part of the manor, and in which 100 marks 
damages were recovered by them, which they sought to enforce in the next 
reign. 3 



'Fine, Easter, 19 Eliz. 3 Abbr. of Pleas, 15 Edw. II. Mich. 128. 

'Fine, Trin. 37 Eliz. 

JI 




258 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

MELTON. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by the Abbot of Ely, 
consisting of 2 carucates of land, 18 villeins, 6 bordars, 2 
serfs, 2 ploughteams in demesne and 5 belonging to the men, 
and 17 acres of meadow. Of live stock there were a rouncy, 
ii hogs, and 37 sheep. There was also a mill. When the 
Survey was taken the abbot still held this manor, but some 
of the details had changed ; there were only 9 villeins, 

there were 13 bordars, no serfs, and the ploughteams belonging to the men 

were reduced to 3^. 

To this manor belonged a hamlet at Bawdsey, and is so reckoned. 
There were 4 socmen with 32 acres of land which they could neither sell 
nor give, 2 ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the Survey) and 2 
acres of meadow, the whole being valued at 405. This manor was a league 
long and 9^ quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 27^. 

The Abbot of Ely had another estate here formerly that of a freeman 
under him, consisting of 2 acres, valued at 4^.' 

Geoffrey de Magnaville had a small estate here at the time of the Survey 
held of him by W., son of Sahala, formerly held by two freemen under 
Haldein's commendation, consisting of 4 acres valued at 8d* 

Roger de Poictou had two estates here at the time of the Survey. 
R., son of Brioldus, had the first, and it was formerly that of seven freemen 
under commendation to the Abbot of Ely, consisting of 60 acres and a 
ploughteam, valued at 8s. 

The second was formerly that of a freeman under the Abbot of Ely, 
consisting of 26 acres, valued at 50^.* 

Another estate here was held of Robert Malet by Humfrey, son of 
Robert, and consisted of 64 acres, formerly held by two freemen under 
Edric's commendation, and a freeman under him had i acre. Also ij 
ploughteams. The value was 155. (reduced to IDS. at the time of the 
Survey). 4 

The only other estate here was held by Earl Alan at the time of the 
Survey, and consisted of 43 acres, a ploughteam, and 2 acres of meadow. 
It was formerly held by six freemen under Edric's commendation, when 
there had been 2 ploughteams. 5 

MELTON MANOR, NOW MELTON WITH UFFORD. 

The Abbot of Ely held this estate at the time of the Conquest and of 
the Norman Survey, and upon the division of the possessions of the Church 
of Ely between the Bishop and the monks in the early part of the I2th 
century by Hervey, first Bishop of Ely, this manor was allotted to the 
Prior and Convent of Ely ; 6 and in 1252 grant of free warren was made 
to the priory. 7 In 1279 Pope Nicholas confirmed the manor to the priory. 

In 1316 we find it held by Robert de Ufford, but probably as lessee, 
and in 1362 held by the Earl of Norfolk, probably in a like capacity. The 
lordship certainly did not leave the priory, and in 1438 we find Robert 

1 Dom. ii. 387, 388. J Dom. ii. 293. 

1 Dom. ii. 412. ' Harl. 43 H. 4, 5. 

Dom. ii. 3476. 'Chart. Rolls, 36 Hen. III. ii. 

Dom. ii. 3186. 



MELTON. 259 

Colvyle, Prior of Ely, holding a first court, in 1510 William Willesley, 
prior, a first court, and in 1522 a first court was held by Robert Wellys, 
Dean of Ely. The loth April, 1565, Thomas Seckford, junior, held a 
court, but no doubt as lessee. The court in 1609 was held by the Dean 
of Ely. In 1668 Elizabeth, widow of Charles Bowles, D.D., vicar of Shome, 
and John Codd, D.D., had a lease of the manor for 21 years, and she assigned 
in 1674 to Robert Marryptt, of Bredfield. In 1696 Thomas Glemham had 
a lease for 21 years, and in 1754 William Negus, as also in 1772 and 1786. 

In 1810 Christiana Burrough, widow, had a lease, and I3th Nov. 1837, 
James Taylor Margetson held a first court as lessee. 

The manor still belongs to the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral 
Church of Ely. 

From the Memoranda Rolls we learn that in 1568 Sir William Buttes 
and his wife were called upon to show by what title they held this 
manor.' The quit rents of the manor in 1747 amounted to 24. 145. 

Five bundles of Court Rolls of this manor were amongst the papers of 
the late H. Jermyn in 1821, and a rental of the manor from a paper in the 
possession of Capt. Brooke in 1836 will be found amongst the Davy MSS. 
m the British Museum. 2 



'M. 10 Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. 35. "Wilford Hundred, fol. 201. 




26o THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

PETTISTREE. 

manor is mentioned in the Domesday Survey under this 
heading, and there is some doubt whether, in fact, any 
manor ever existed in Pettistree other than Bing Hall and 
Davelers. Davy, however, states that Roger de Hunting- 
field had a grant in 1253 of manor, market, fair, and free 
warren here, 1 and that in 1316 the manor was held by Robert 
de Ufford. Page says the lordship of the parish of Pettistree 
was anciently vested in the De Uffords, Earls of Suffolk. 

BING HALL MANOR. 

This was the estate of Edric in the Confessor's time, and was held by 
Robert Malet at the time of the Survey. 

No manor apparently existed in Saxon times, but Edric held here a 
carucate and a half of land, with i villein, i bordar, I serf, i ploughteam, 
2 acres of meadow, i rouncy, 4 beasts, 16 hogs, and 80 sheep, valued at 
2os. In Norman days the value had doubled, and there were 2 bordars 
and 2 plought earns. 

Another portion of land here was held in Saxon times by Godric under 
commendation to Edric, with 40 acres, i bordar, and i ploughteam, valued 
at 75., and under him were two freemen with 12 acres and half a ploughteam, 
valued at 2s. The Conquest had the effect of making Godric hold of Walter 
de Caen, who held of Robert Malet as tenant in chief. 2 

In 1253 Roger de Huntingfield held the manor, which on his death in 
1256' went to his widow Joan, who died in 1297, when it passed to her 
grandson and heir, Roger de Huntingfield, son of her son, William de 
Huntingfield, who had died in 1282. Roger de Huntingfield died in 1302, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, William de Huntingfield, and 
on his death in 1313* a third passed in dower to his widow Sibilla, and 
subject thereto vested in his son and heir, Roger de Huntingfield, then aged 
eight years. On the Close Rolls for 1314 is an order to the escheator not 
to meddle with lands in Bing " late held by William de Huntingfield of 
the King as of the Honor of Eye by knight's service." 5 And on the same 
Rolls in 1327 is an order to discharge Walter de Norwich of a third of the 
manor which " Sibyl the widow of William de Huntingfield " held in dower. 6 
Roger de Huntingfield died in 1337,' when the manor went to his son and 
heir, William de Huntingfield, who died in 1376 without issue. 1 The manor 
then went under settlement to William de Ufford for life, and in 1383 John 
de Pyeshale, clerk, and Robert de Ashfield, no doubt trustees, in whom the 
manor had been vested for the purpose, had licence to grant to the prioress 
and convent of Campsey. With the priory the manor is said to have 
continued until the dissolution of that house, though as a matter of fact 
the manor is mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Robert Willoughby, Knt., 
who died in 1465,' and also in that of his son and heir, Robert Willoughby, 
who died two years later. 10 

'Chart. Rolls, 37 Hen. III. n. 7 I.P.M., n Edw. III. 47. 

*Dom. ii. 3196. 'As to the Huntingfield family and further 

M.P.M., 41 Hen. III., 29, or File 20 (9). particulars see Huntingfield Manor 

4 I.P.M. ( 7 Edw. II. 47. in Blything Hundred. 

'Close Rolls, 8 Edw. II. n (5); 8 Edw. II. 'I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 35. 

30 ; Originalia, 8 Edw. II. 15. I0 1. P.M., 7 Edw. IV. 37. 
Close Rolls, i Edw. III. 6 (5). 



PETTISTREE. 261 

In 1538 King Hen. VIII. granted the manor to Sir Anthony Wingfield, 
Knt., and it is said he had licence in 1551 to alienate to Thomas, Lord 
Wentworth. The manor, however, did not leave the Wingfield family, for 
Sir Anthony died seised of it 2Oth August, 1552, when it passed to his son 
and heir, Sir Robert Willoughby.' In the time of Queen Elizabeth, Sir 
James Wingfield, Knt., was called upon to show title to the manor. 2 On 
Sir Robert's death in 1596 the manor passed to his son and heir, Sir Anthony 
who dying without issue it went to his brother, Sir Thomas Wingfield, who 
died in 1609. 

From this time to the death of Sir Henry Wingfield, 4th Bart., in 
1677, the manor descended in the same course as the Manor of Dallinghoo, 
in Loes Hundred. From the 4th Bart., Sir Henry Wingfield, this manor 
passed to his son and heir, Sir Henry Wingfield, 5th Bart., who sold it in 
1708 to William Henry Nassau, ist Earl of Rochford, who died this same 
year. From this time to the present time the manor has devolved in the 
same course as the Manor of Easton, in Loes Hundred, and is now vested 
in the trustees of the late Duke of Hamilton, who died in 1895. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth, 
is a suit between Robert Kempe and William Smythe, touching copyholds 
of this manor. 3 

MANOR OF DAVELERS al. BACON'S. 

In the time of Edw. I. this was the lordship of Bartholomew Davillers. 
An action against him and others by Alianor, daughter of Robert Houel, 
touching a tenement in Pettistree will be found referred to on the Patent 
Rolls in 1281." 

Bartholomew Davillers died in 1287, from which time to the death of 
Sir Robert Bacon, Knt., who married Isabel, daughter of another Bartholo- 
mew Davillers, and died in 1375, the manor passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Erwarton, in Samford Hundred. 

In 1544 the manor was vested in Richard Poty or Pootye, and a fine 
was this year levied against him by Francis Noone and others.* 

In 1549 we find the manor vested in H. Parker, who this year had 
licence to alienate it to Robert Hide. 

In 1576 we meet with a fine of the Manor of Davelers levied by Roger 
Roser and others against John Pootye and others, 6 but we have some doubt 
whether this and the fine levied in 1544 were, in fact, levied of this manor. 

In 1609 the manor was held by Thomas Cooke. 

In 1793 appeared an advertisement of the intended sale by auction on 
Tuesday, i6th July, at the Golden Lion, Ipswich, of " All that Manor or 
reputed Manor of Davellers, with the mansion and offices, situated at 
Pettistree, together with a farm consisting of 326 acres of land. 7 



'I.P.M., 7 Edw. VI. 65. s Fine, Mich. 36 Hen. VIII. 

"Memoranda, 14 Eliz. Hil. Rec. Rot. 81. 6 Fine, Hil. 18 Eliz. 
3 C.P. Ser. ii. B. cviii. 9. ? Ipswich Journal, 6th July, 1793. 

4 Pat. Rolls, 9 Edw. I. 4. 



262 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

RAMS HOLT. 

|HE only manor held in Ramsholt is entered in the Survey 
under the head " Peituna." In the time of the Confessor 
Godric held it under Harold's commendation. It consisted 
of 3 carucates of land, 10 villeins, 4 bordars, a serf, 2 plough- 
teams in demesne and 3 belonging to the men, 3 acres of 
meadow, a mill, 2 rouncies, 4 beasts, a hog, and 27 sheep, 
valued at 6os. When the Survey was taken this manor was 
held by Suane of Essex, and there were 8 villeins, the serf and the rouncies 
had disappeared, there were 2 beasts, and 6 hogs, while the value was 405. 
It was a league long and 4 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 




Suane of Essex also had an estate here of 80 acres of land, 2 acres of 
meadow, and 2 ploughteams, valued at 155., which had formerly belonged 
to 20 freemen under Godric's commendation, when the value was 135.' 

At the time of the Survey Robert Malet had three estates in this place. 
The first was held of him by Ralph, and was formerly that of three freemen 
and a half under commendation to Godric, Suane's predecessor. It con- 
sisted of 29 acres and 2 ploughteams, valued at 55. In Saxon times there 
had been but one ploughteam, and the value was IDS. 

The second was formerly the estate of five freemen under Edric's 
commendation (one being half under commendation to Roger Bigot's 
predecessor), and consisted of 16 acres and a ploughteam (reduced to half 
a team at the time of the Survey), valued at 2$. 

The third, which belonged to Malet's demesne, consisted of 80 acres, 
valued at 75., the former valuation having been 55.* 

The only other holding here was in the time of the Confessor, that of 
six freemen under Godric's commendation, consisting of 20 acres and a 
ploughteam (reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey), valued at 
IDS. The Domesday tenant was Ralph de Bellafago. 3 

RAMSHOLT MANOR. 

This was held by Robert Malet in demesne at the time of the Survey, 
Ralph holding it under him. It appears later to have vested in Roger le 
Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, who in 1307 held a fee here, 4 and passed on to 
Margaret, Countess of Norfolk, in 1362. 

In the reign of King Edw. IV. the manor was vested in Sir John Wing- 
field, Knt., who died in 1481,' when it passed to his son and heir, John 
Wingfield. 

In the reign of Hen. VIII. the manor vested in John Purpett, of New- 
borne, who died in 1536," when it passed to his son and heir, Edward 
Purpett. And amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen 
Elizabeth we find a suit by John Purpett against William Waller and others 
touching parcel of this manor. 7 

1 Dom. ii. 4026. I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 39. 

'Dom. ii. 3186. M.P.M., 33 Hen. VIII. 78. 

J Dom. ii. 3546. 7 C.P. Ser. ii. B. cxliv. 14. 
I.P.M., 35 Edw. 1.45. 



RAMSHOLT. 263 

In the same reign we find Jane Wingfield holding a third part of a 
manor, which on her death in 1562 went to her daughter and heir, Elizabeth 
Wingfield. 

In 1609 the manor was held by Philip Lewgar, and passed on his 
death to his daughter and heir Elizabeth. 

In 1844 the manor was vested in the trustees of Peter Thellusson, and 
no doubt devolved in the same course as the Manor of Naunton Hall, 
Rendlesham, in Loes Hundred, being now vested in Lord Rendlesham. 

A fine was levied of " Lynges, Ramsholt Manor " by Robert Brooke, 
junior, against James Hobart and others in 1587.' 

MANOR OF PEYTON HALL. 

This was the manor held at the time of the Survey by Suane of Essex, 
and it passed, as did the Manor of Stratford St. Mary's, in Samford Hundred, 
until forfeited as there mentioned in 1163, when it passed to the Crown. 

This at least is the statement sometimes made, but we find that the 
lordship of Peyton Hall was held by Reginald Peyton/ 2nd son of Walter, 
lord of Sibton, younger brother of William Malet, lord of the Honor of Eye, 
as early as 1135. Reginald occupied the office of server to Hugh Bigot, 
Earl of Norfolk. Reginald had two sons, William and John. John had 
issue four sons Sir John, the elder, Robert, Peter, and John the younger. 
Robert was Lord Justice of Ireland in the reigns of Hen. III. and Edw. I., 
and being lord of Ufford assumed that surname. Peter continued the name 
of Peyton, and inherited the Manor of Peyton Hall. Peter de Peyton 
was succeeded by his son Robert, and he by his son, Sir John de Peyton, and 
he by Henry de Peyton, the male line failing in the reign of Edw. III. The 
manor then passed to John de Vere, Earl of Oxford, who died in I36o, 3 
when it went to Thomas de Vere, Earl of Oxford, who died in 1371.* 

In 1428 the manor seems to have been vested in William Waller, from 
whom it later came down to another William Waller, of Ipswich, who died 
the 8th April, 1535,* when it passed to his son, William Waller (said, how- 
ever, in the Davy MSS. to be son of Richard Waller, of Ipswich.) 6 He 
married twice, 1st a daughter of - - Methwold, of Langford, co. Norfolk, 
and 2ndly Anne, daughter of - - Colton, of Panfield Hall, co. Essex. He died 
ist Nov. 1547,' when the manor passed to his son and heir, William Waller, 8 
who by his ist wife Margaret, daughter of Thomas Naunton, of Bramford 
and Alderton, had a son a lunatic who married Cecily, daughter of 
Robert Rotoman (?), of Ipswich, but died without issue, when the manor 
vested in his half-brother, Thomas Waller, son of William by his 2nd wife, 
Alice Holland. Thomas Waller was aged 18 in 1567, and married Priscilla 
Brodwater, and on his death the manor passed to his 3rd son, James Waller, 
of Ramsholt, who married Dorothy, daughter of Arthur Jackson, of London, 
merchant, and died 28th Feb. 16 at the age of 39, being buried at Ramsholt. 
He had three children, all of whom, however, died in their father's lifetime 
without issue. 

'Fine, Trin. 29 Eliz. 'I.P.M., 28 Hen. VIII. 25. 

"See Peyton Hall, Boxford, in Babergh "Richard's wiD is dated ist March, 1536. 

Hundred. 'I.P.M., i Edw. VI. 152. 

3 I.P.M., 34 Edw. III. 84. M.P.M., at Ipswich, 3rd Jan., 9 Eliz. 

4 1.P.M., 45 Edw. III. 45. (1566-7). 



264 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
we find an action respecting this manor between Edmund Heygate (Higate) 
and Thomas Tanner. 

In 1738 amongst the Treasury Papers we find a petition of Thomas 
World concerning his father's mortgage of " Peyton Hall Manor"; 1 and three 
years later we meet with the royal sign manual for a Bill to pass the priory 
seal for releasing to this Thomas World the manor. 1 

In 1764 the manor was held by Lord St. John, and in 1811 by Robert 
Trotman (?), of Ipswich. 

In 1829 the manor was vested in Mrs. Wyse, and in 1855 in Joseph 
White, of Sutton Hall, Cheshire, and in 1885 in another Joseph White, who 
resided at Bredfield House. 

" Pey tones " Manor is included in the inquisition post mortem of Joan, 
wife of Sir William Parre, in 1476,* and a descent of this manor in 1597 
is given in the Rawlinson MSS. in the Bodleian. 5 



'C.P. Ser. ii. B. Ixxx. 27 ; Ib. B. Ixxxii. 8. I. P.M. 15 Edw. IV. 34. 
T.B. & P. 1738, 541, 565- 5 Rawl - B - 319. 

JT.B. & P. 1741,532. 



SHOTTISHAM. 265 

SHOTTISHAM. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Osmund, a freeman 
under Edric's commendation, consisting of 44 acres, a 
bordar, a ploughteam (reduced to half a team at the time 
of the Survey), and 2 acres of meadow. The value was 205., 
reduced to los. at the time of the Survey, when it was held 
by Walter Balistarius of Robert Malet. It was 7 quaren- 
tenes long and 4 broad, and paid in a gelt 13^. There 
was also a church with 13 acres, valued at 




In the same place was another estate of Robert Malet, formerly the 
estate of 12 freemen under Edric's commendation, and three under com- 
mendation of Godric of Peyton. It consisted of 80 acres, 3 ploughteams 
(reduced to ij teams at the time of the Survey), and an acre of meadow ; 
the value was i6s. (increased to 2os. at the time of the Survey). 

Robert Malet had three other holdings here at the time of the Survey. 
The first was formerly that of a freeman, half under commendation to 
Godwin, consisting of 7 acres, valued at I2d. 

The second was formerly that of Siric, a freeman under commendation 
of the Confessor, consisting of 12 acres and half an acre of meadow, valued 
at 2s. (increased to 45. at the time of the Survey). 

The third was formerly that of four freemen (two under Godric's 
commendation and two under Osmund's commendation), consisting of 
32$ acres and a ploughteam (reduced to half a team at the time of the 
Survey). The value was 45. (increased by is. at the time of the Survey).' 

The other two estates mentioned in this place were held when the 
Survey was taken by the Abbot of Ely. The first was formerly held by a 
freeman and a half under commendation of the abbot, and consisted of 7 
acres, valued at I2d. The second consisted of only i acre, valued at zd? 

SHOTTISHAM HALL MANOR. 

This was the estate in Saxon times preceding the Conquest of Osmund, 
a freeman, and at the time of the Survey belonged to Robert Malet, under 
whom Walter Balistarius held. Davy says that in 1316 the manor belonged 
to Roger Bigot, Earl of Norfolk, but this is open to doubt, and seems 
rather inconsistent with the fact that both manor and advowson are 
included in the inquis. p.m. of John de Vallibus in 1288,' where an extent 
is given. Subsequently the manor vested in the Glanville family. A fine 
was in 1343 levied of the manor and advowson by Richard de Glaunvill 
and Ellen his wife against Richard de Westhorp, parson of Sutton church, 
and Robert Hothot, parson of the church of " Shatesham ;" 4 and in 1360 
a fine was levied also of the manor and advowson by John, parson of WUby 
church, John, parson of Shottisham church, and William, parson of Sutton 
church, against George de Glaunvyle ; 5 and another by George Glaunvyle 
and Matilda his wife against the said John, parson of Wilby. 6 The manor 
and advowson about 1428 went to the Wingfield family, being then held by 

1 Dom. ii. 318, 319, 324. 4 Feet of Fines, 17 Edw. III. 10. 

*Dom. ii. 387, 388. 5 Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. III. 4. 

3 I.P.M., 16 Edw. 1,41. 6 Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. III. 20. 

KI 



266 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Robert YVingfield. He 1 levied a fine of them in 1444 against John Mariot 
and Katherine his wife.* In 15*3 the manor was held by another Robert 
Wingfield. 

In 1596 a fine was levied of the manor by John Aldriche against Thomas 
Shawe. 5 

In 1609 the manor was held by William Hovel. It had probably 
come to the Hovel family in the person of Richard Hovel under a fine levied 
by him of the manor in 1598 against Peter Tyrrell and others, 4 and about 
1649 it passed to Miles Fernely, 5 who married Eleanor, daughter of Sir 
Thomas Bendish, Bart., and died 22nd Oct. 1661, when the manor vested 
in his son and heir, William Fernely, who erected a monument to his father 
in Sutton church. 

In the early part of the i8th century we find the manor vested in Henry 
Negus, from whom it appears to have passed to Francis Negus, who mort- 
gaged the manor and estate to Joseph Kell, of Woodbridge, and died 
indebted to the Crown. Joseph Kell, as mortgagee, foreclosed, and in 1739 
amongst the State Papers we meet with a petition to the Treasury from 
this Joseph Kell, who is described as a mariner, of Woodbridge, concerning 
his title to the manor and advowson, which the petition states he had 
purchased from Francis Negus. 6 The following year we meet with another 
petition from Joseph Kell to the Treasury concerning his mortgage of 
Shottisham Hall, 7 and the succeeding year the royal sign manual was 
placed to a Bill to pass Privy Seal for releasing from debt to the Crown 
Shottisham Hall and lands " mortgaged to Joseph Kell, of Woodbridge, 
by Francis Negus, who died indebted to the Crown."' 

In 1781 Mary Kell and William Kell presented to Shottisham church. 
Marian, daughter and heir of - - married William Kell, of Kelsale, 

and seems to have had the manor. He died in 1820, when Elizabeth 
widow of John Darby, and Mary Kell appear to have taken under his 
will, and held in 1844 and 1855. I n J 885 the manor was held by Mrs. 
C. T. Darby, and it is now owned by Mrs. W. W. Darby. 

Arms of KELL : Quarterly, crenelle Arg. and Sa. 



MANOR OF TALVIES OR TALVAS. 

This was probably the estate of Robert Malet at the time of the Survey, 
as we find it subsequently held of the Honor of Eye. 

In the time of Edw. II. Thomas Televas held the manor, and on the 

Close Rolls in 1314 we find an order to deliver to William de Maundevill 

land in Shottisham taken into the King's hand for alienation by Thomas 

' Televase " to William de Maundevile and Margaret his daughter without 

licence, being held of the Honor of Eye. 9 

'This could hardly have been the holder Fine, Mich. 40-41 Eliz. 

of Thorpe Hall, Hasketon, in Carl- J See Manor of Creeling St. Peter's, in 

ford Hundred, for he died in 1431 Stow Hundred. 

when that manor went to his son 6 T. B. & P. 1739, 87. 

and heir, Sir John Wingfield. 'T. B. & P. 1740, 342. 

* Feet of Fines, 22 Hen. VI. 7. 8 T. B. & P. 1 741, 532. 

'Fine, Easter, 38 Eliz. 'Close Rolls, 7 Edw. II. $ ; 0. 7 Edw. II. 12. 



SHOTTISHAM. ?6? 

From Thomas Talvas the manor seems to have passed to Margaret 
Talvas, and on her death in 1315' went to her cousin and heir, Robert 
Talvas, 2 and about 1333 appears to have vested in Thomas Talevas. 

In 1438 the manor appears to have been vested in Nicholas, Abbot of 
St. Edmunds, and somewhat later in Sir John Wingfield, Knt., who died 
in 1481, 3 when it passed to his son and heir, Sir John Wingfield. He in 
1541 sold the manor to William Fernely or Fernley, citizen and mercer 
of London, 4 who held his first court for the manor in 1541-2. On his 
death the manor passed to his son and heir, Thomas Fernely, and a fine of 
the manor was levied by John Holdiche against this Thomas Fernely in 
I 559- 5 O n the death of Thomas Fernely in 1591 the manor passed to his 
son and heir, John Fernely, of West Greeting, who died in 1621, when it 
went to his son and heir, Miles Fernely, who died in 1661, when it passed 
to his son and heir, William Fernely, who held his first court 8th June this 
year. He sold the manor with the Manors of Sutton, Campsey otherwise 
Woodhall, Stockerland, and Talvas, in 1675, for 4,000 to Sir Nicholas 
Bacon, Knt., who held his first court loth Aug. this year, and died in 1687, 
when the manor passed to his son and heir, Nicholas Bacon, who held his 
first court I2th April, 1688. On his death the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Nicholas Bacon, who held his first court I3th Oct. 1698, and died in 
1767, when it went to the Rev. John Bacon, of Shrubland Hall, who died 
in 1788. His brother, the Rev. Nicholas Bacon, succeeded, and held his 
first court 23rd June, 1788. He sold the manor about 1789 to W T illiam 
Waller (son of William Waller, of Sutton), who held his first court 27th 
Jan. 1791. William Waller was succeeded by Thomas, who held his first 
court 2Oth Nov. 1806. He married Mary Naunton, of Seckford, who 
died 6th May, 1811, at the age of 43. Thomas Waller resided at Sutton, 
and died i5th Oct. 1836, at the age of 71, when the manor seems to have 
passed to his eldest son, Thomas Waller, of Eyke, who died ist Feb. 1890, 
in his goth year, when the manor passed to his nephew, William Naunton 
Waller, 2nd son of the Rev. Charles Waller, who had married 28th Dec. 
1831, Catherine, daughter of the Rev. Joseph Julian, of Trimley, 6 and died 
I7th Aug. 1842, at the early age of 38. William Naunton Waller was born 
in 1833, and resided at Little Bealings. In 1870 he married Edith, daughter 
of Sir Francis Murphy, and was High Sheriff for Suffolk in 1894. He died 
loth Sept. 1899. The manor is now vested in Mrs. W. W. Darby. 

By custom the youngest son is heir. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings will be found an action by George 
Brytwell and Robert Margets against William Malster and George Harvye, 
concerning lands held of this manor. 7 



1 1.P.M., 8 Edw. II. 44. 4 See Manor of Greeting St. Peters, in Stow 

a He is probably the man mentioned in the Hundred, for marriages of Ferneleys. 

Patent Rolls in 1339 (Pat. Rolls, Fine, Hil. 33 Hen. VIII. 

13 Edw. III. pt. ii. 14.) * Fine, Mich. I Eliz. 

3 1. P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 'She died 2gth November, 1840, aged 33. 

'C.P. i. 103. 




268 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

SUTTON. 

ERE were several manors here in Saxon times, three of 
them held when the Survey was taken by Robert Malet. 
The first of these was formerly held by Leofstan, a freeman 
under Edric, and consisted of 60 acres of land and a plough- 
team (reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey), 
and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 35. Under him was a 
holding of two half-freemen consisting of 4 acres included 
in the said valuation. 

The second was held of him by Walter de Caen, and consisted of a 
half-freeman, Godwin by name, who was formerly under commendation 
to Edric, with 12 acres, half a bordar, half a ploughteam, an acre of meadow, 
3 beasts, and 60 sheep. The value in Saxon times was 2s., and at the time 
of the Survey 55. 

Forty acres were also held by nine freemen under the said Godwin, 
and by a freeman under commendation to Halden in the Confessor's time. 
With this estate there was a ploughteam and half an acre of meadow, 
valued at 45. By the time of the Survey the value had gone up to 75. 

Another holding of Walter de Caen under Malet consisted of two free- 
men formerly under commendation to Edric with 61 acres, and under 
one of them were five freemen. Also 2 ploughteams and ij acres of meadow, 
valued in Saxon times at 75., but in Norman days at 155. 

There was also a church with 20 acres included in the above valuation. 

The third of Robert Malet's manors was formerly held by a freeman 
under Edric's commendation, consisting of 80 acres, a ploughteam, and 3 
acres of meadow, valued at 2os. Malet also had an estate, formerly of 
eight freemen under Lustwin's commendation, consisting of 40 acres, 2 
acres of meadow, and 2 ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the Survey). 
The value was in Saxon times 45., but at the time of the Survey 75. 

Robert Malet also held other estates or properties in this place. The 
first consisted of 80 acres of land, 4 ploughteams, and 4 acres of meadow, 
formerly the estate of 22 freemen (20 under Edric's commendation and two 
under the Abbot of Ely), when the ploughteams had been 6. These were 
included in the valuation of Hollesley. The estate was a league long and 
8 quarentenes broad, and paid in a gelt 2jd. 

The second consisted of 25 acres, half a ploughteam held in the Con- 
fessor's time by a freeman under Edric's commendation, a freeman under 
him with i acre, the value being 45. At the time of the Survey the three 
sons of the Saxon freeman dwelt here, and the value was 55. The third 
consisted of 10 acres, i ploughteam, and i acre of meadow, valued at 2$. Sd. t 
formerly held by a freeman under Edric's commendation, but at the time 
of the Survey by Ralph, of Robert Malet. The fourth consisted of 13 acres 
and a team of oxen, valued at i6d., and held by Hubert of Malet, having 
been formerly held by a freeman under Edric's commendation, when there 
was half a ploughteam only. The fifth consisted of 16 acres and half a 
ploughteam, valued at 45., belonging to a freeman under Edric's commen- 
dation, which Malet held in demesne. The sixth was held of Malet by 
Gilbert the Blond, and consisted of 44 acres and half a ploughteam, with an 
acre of meadow, valued at 45., having formerly been held by three freemen 
under Edric's commendation with 2 ploughteams. 1 

'Dom. ii. 317, 3176, 318, 319, 3246, 325. 



SUTTON. 269 

Another manor in this place was among the lands of the Abbot of Ely, 
held of him by Robert Malet at the time of the Survey, of the value of 55., 
having been formerly the estate of Godwin, a half-freeman under the abbot's 
commendation, when it was valued at 2s. The estate consisted of 12 acres, 
half a bordar, half a ploughteam (which had disappeared at the time of 
the Survey, when there was, however, an extra acre of meadow). The 
abbot also had an estate of 40 acres, i ploughteam, and half an acre of 
meadow, held by nine freemen under Godwin, and a freeman under com- 
mendation of the abbot. The value in Saxon times was 45., but at the time 
of the Survey 7$.' 

The last manor held here was that of Atser in the time of the Confessor, 
and consisted of 60 acres, 2 bordars, a ploughteam (reduced at the time of 
the Survey to half a team), and half an acre of meadow, valued at IDS. 
At the time of the Survey it was held by Arcebald of Hervey de Berri. 
Hervey de Berri also had 6 acres here, and a team of 6 oxen, valued at 8s., 
which had been formerly held by Arcebald, a freeman under Edric's 
commendation. Of this William Malet was seised at the time of his 
death.* 

Finally, Earl Alan had here 34 acres and 2 ploughteams, which were 
formerly the estate of three freemen under commendation of Edric the 
Grim. 3 

We find an entry in the Survey under the heading " Campsey " or 
" Capeseia," and no doubt reference is made to Campsey in Sutton. Fifty 
acres of land were held in Saxon times here, as a manor by Brictmar, a socman 
under the Abbot of Ely, and he could not give or sell the land. To this 
manor were attached 2 acres of meadow, a villein, 3 bordars, a ploughteam, 
and mill. At the time of the Survey the ploughteam and the mill had 
disappeared. Brictmar rendered 355., apparently included in the valuation 
of Udeham or Woodhall, in Sutton. The Domesday tenant was Gilbert, 
Bishop of Evreux. 4 

SUTTON HALL MANOR. 

This was the estate of Robert Malet at the time of the Survey, 
and in the I3th century was vested in John, son of William de 
Holesle, for amongst the early deeds of the Court of Chancery in the Public 
Record Office we find a letter of attorney from him authorising Sir Stephen 
de Ludham his chaplain and Adam his servant to place Richard de Avillers 
or Davillers, rector of the church of Sutton, in seisin of the manor and 
advowson of Sutton, and the mill of the wood called " Wudemell." 5 In 
1316 the manor was vested in Richard de Glanville. He was the eldest son 
of Nicholas de Glanville, a younger son of Gilbert de Glanville, sometimes 
styled Earl of Suffolk. Sir Richard had not only the manor, but the 
advowson, and presented in 1311, 1314, and 1338 to Sutton church. 

In the year 1316 it is recorded that he was lord of the township of 
Sutton, and in obedience to a military writ of summons attended the array 
and muster of the Hundred of " Loose," in Suffolk. 

In 1323 Sir Richard Glanville and Elena his wife and John their son 
levied a fine of the manor and advowson against Oliver, parson of Sutton 
church, and William de Witheringsett.' 

'Dom. ii. 387. 4 Dom. ii. 3886. 

'Dom. ii. 443. 5 C. 2186. 

1 Dom. ii. 293. 6 Feet of Fines, 17 Edw. II. 29. 



270 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

On the 24th April, 1326, it being Thursday after the Feast of St. George, 
Richard de GlanvUle again answered the call to arms and the muster of 
barons and knights connected with Loes Hundred, probably accompanied 
by the men-at-arms belonging to his lordships. 

The military writs issued during this year were no doubt for the defence 
of the country from an invasion by the French. Sir Richard de GlanvUle 
left issue Richard, William, John, and Robert, and the lordship of Sutton 
passed to his eldest son, Richard de GlanvUle, and he dying before his wife 
Elena, she presented a rector to Sutton church in 1361. Richard and Elena left 
one son, Robert de GlanvUle, who became possessor of his father's lands. 
The manor, however, does not seem to have descended through this branch, 
but to have passed to Sir Gilbert de GlanvUle, son of Gilbert de GlanvUle, 
brother of Nicholas de GlanvUle, father of Sir Richard, who presented to 
Sutton, as above stated, in 1311, 1314, and 1338. 

We meet with a fine of the manor levied in 1360 by George GlanvUle 
and MatUda his wife against John, parson of Wilby church, 1 and another 
fine levied the same year by John, parson of \Vilby church, John, parson 
of Shottisham church, and William, parson of Sutton church, against the 
said George " Glaunvyl.'" 

On Sir GUbert's death the manor passed to his daughter and heir 
Alianore, who married Sir John Wingfield, of Wingfield Castle, and from 
them passed to their daughter, Katherine Wingfield, who married Michael 
de la Pole, created Earl of Suffolk 6th August, 1385. 

We find the manor shortly afterwards vested in Sir Robert Wingfield, 
Knt., s who died in 1409, when it passed to his son and heir, Sir Robert 
Wingfield, who held his first court in 1421-2, and upon his death about 1431 
passed to his son and heir, Sir John Wingfield, and on his death in 1481,* 
went to his widow Elizabeth, Lady Wingfield, and subject to her interest 
passed to their son and heir, Sir John Wingfield, who held his first court 
in 1499, and on his death vested in his son and heir, Sir Anthony Wingfield, 
who in 1541 sold the manor to William Ferneley, citizen and mercer of 
London/ who held his first court 1541-2, and from this time to the death 
of Thomas Waller, I5th Oct. 1836, the manor passed through the Ferneleys 
and Bacons in the same course as the Manor of Talvies, Shottisham, in this 
Hundred, and in 1896 was vested in WUliam Naunton WaUer, of Sutton 
HaU. He was the 2nd son of the Rev. Charles Waller, of Trimley St. 
Martin, by Catherine, daughter of the Rev. Joseph Julian, of Trimley, and 
in 1870 married Edith, daughter of Sir Francis Murphy, and died loth 
Sept. 1899, aged 66. 

The manor is now vested in Sir William Cuthbert QuUter, Bart., M.P., 
of Bawdsey. 

A fine of the manor was levied in 1559 by John Holdiche against 
Thomas Ferneley,' and in 1585 by W. Burwell and others against Alexander 
Beddingfield. 7 

These two fines may apply to Pistries Manor, in Sutton. 

1 Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. III. 20. 4 1.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 

Feet of Fines, 34 Edw. III. 4. 'Fine, Hil. 33 Hen. VIII. 

5 For fuller particulars as to these descents 6 Fine, Mich, i Eliz. 

see Thorpe Hall Manor, Hasketon, 'Fine, Mich. 27-28 Eliz. 

in Carlford Hundred. 



SUTTON. 271 

Records of the manor by T. Shawe (1605) will be found amongst the 
Add. MSS. in the British Museum, 1 and a yearly rental of the manor 2Qth 
Sept. 1724, will be found amongst the Davy MSS. in the same depository. 2 

MANOR OF STOKERLAND. 

In the Domesday Survey under the head Stokerland, which is a manor 
of Sutton, we find two small estates mentioned, one held by Gilbert de 
Colville of Robert Malet, consisting of 30 acres, half a ploughteam, and 
half an acre of meadow, valued at 55., a considerable rise from the value in 
Saxon times of 40^., when the estate was held by two freemen under Edric's 
commendation. The other estate was that of a socman with 30 acres, 
which he could not sell or give. He had a ploughteam and 2 acres of 
meadow, the whole valued at 8s., as against the former valuation of 55. 
Robert Malet was the tenant in chief. 3 

About 1541 the manor became vested in William Ferneley, and from 
this time the manor has apparently devolved in the same course as the 
main Manor of Sutton. 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
is a claim by Robert Myles to recover title deeds of land and heath called 
" Stockerland Heath, in Sutton," held by plaintiff of the Manor of 
Stockerland. 4 

WOODHALL MANOR. 

A manor was held here in Saxon times by Turmod, entered in the 
Survey under " Udeham." It consisted of 2 carucates of land, 2 villeins, 
2 ploughteams in demesne, and i belonging to the men, 10 acres of meadow, 
a mill, a rouncy, 7 beasts, and 56 hogs, valued at 405. At the time of the 
Survey this manor was held by Gilbert, Bishop of Evreux, and the only 
alteration was there were 7 villeins, while the value had increased to 12.* 

" Woodhall tenement," in Sutton, is mentioned hi the inquis. p.m. 
of Sir John Wingfield, in 1481.' 

In 1553 this manor was held by William Fernely, and from him to 1661 
it passed in the same course as the main Manor of Sutton. 

In 1837 tne manor was vested by purchase in Henry Edwards. 

Woodhall stands about ij miles from the church, and is a fine old 
manorial house, now belonging to Sir William Cuthbert Quilter, Bart., of 
Bawdsey. 

MANOR OF FENNHALL. 

This manor seems to have been held in 1348 by John de Sutton, oi 
Wyvenho, Knt., and Margaret his wife, and this year they levied fines of it 
against Amnesia, daughter of Thomas Baldewyne and Walter de Barkworth 
and Katharine his wife, 7 and against John Wolf, of Manntre and Joan his 
wife. 8 

Subsequently the lordship passed to Bartholomew, Lord Burghersh, 
who died in 1369, when it passed to his daughter and heir, married to 
Edward, Lord Despenser, who died hi 1375, when it passed to his son and 

1 Add. 23950 copies. 'Dom. ii. 

'Add. MSS. 19113, fol. 286. 6 I.P.M., 21 Edw. IV. 59. 

sDorn. ii. 7 Moiety, Feet of Fines, 23 Edw. III. 

C.P. ii. 247. 8 Third part, Feet of Fines, 23 Edw. III. 5. 



272 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

heir, Thomas le Despenser, Earl of Gloucester, who died in 1400. Prior 
to this, however, the manor had passed to the Tudenham family, and we 
meet with a fine levied of it in 1384 by Hugh Houel against Sir John Tuden- 
ham and Margaret his wife, sister of Sir Edmund de Weyland.' 

On Margaret's death in 1416 the manor passed in the same course as 
the Manor of Brandeston, in Loes Hundred, to the time of Sir Edmund 
Bedingfield in 1541. 

We next find the manor in Edmund, son of Edmund Burwell, of Sutton. 
Edmund married Margaret, daughter of Thomas Alvard, of Ipswich, and 
on his death the manor passed to his son and heir, William Burwell, who 
levied with others a fine of the manor in 1585 against Alexander Bedding- 
field and others.* William Burwell held his first court 25th Sept. 1585, 
and married Lora Watson, of Essex. He died 24th March, 1596, at the 
age of 80, and was buried at Sutton, when the manor passed to his son and 
heir, Francis Burwell, who was baptised at Sutton 25th July, 1562, and held 
his first court 7th June, 1596. He married Jane, daughter of Simon Mawe, 
of Rendlesham, and he was buried at Sutton I3th July, 1627. His will 
bears date 3rd Oct. 1625, and it was proved i8th Oci. 1627. The manor 
devolved on his son and heir, Francis Burwell, who married Anne, daughter 
of Joseph Sidnay, of Hitcham. Francis was buried at Sutton I3th Jan. 
1651, and the manor passed to his son and heir, Francis Burwell, who held 
his first court gth Oct. 1652, and married Susan, daughter and heir of John 
Hampton, of London. 3 Francis Burwell died I3th Aug. 1678, at the age 
of 58, and the manor passed under his will dated I4th Nov. 1677, for life, 
to his widow Susan, who held her first court 8th May, 1679. On her death 
without issue the manor, under Francis's will (his mother-in-law, to whom 
he had devised the first estate after his widow's death being then apparently 
dead), passed to his cousin, William Burwell, son of Simon Burwell, the 
brother of the last Francis Burwell's father, which Simon had been baptised 
at Sutton 2Oth Jan. 1589, and buried there 6th April, 1646. William Bur- 
well married Elizabeth, daughter of the Rev. John Glover, rector of 
Shottisham, and on his death the manor vested in his son and heir, Charles 
Burwell, who held his first court 4th Feb. 1711, and married Mary, daughter 
of Allen Cotton, of Marlesford. He died 28th April, 1741, at the age of 
70, and was buried at Sutton. They had four children a son Charles, 
born 24th March, 1711, and buried 2ist June, 1713, and three daughters- 
Rose, died 22nd Jan. 1723, at the age of nine ; Frances, baptised at Sutton, 
ist Sept. 1715, and died young; and Mary, baptised 5th April, 1711, who 
alone survived her parents. She inherited the manor, and married William 
Edgar, of Glemham. She held her first court 2nd Nov. 1758, and died 
I4th Nov. 1770, at the age of 55. 

About 1847 Mary Hunt, widow, died seised of the manor, and her 
trustees offered it for sale, together with Pettistree Hall, " free of great 
Tithes or Rentcharge in lieu thereof and nearly all freehold in Sutton 
containing altogether 274 acres or thereabouts then in the occupation of 
William Waller, Esq."' 

In 1791 we find the manor vested in Bui-well Edwards, for he held a 
court 2gth April this year. In 1885 the manor belonged to Charles Austin, 
of Brandeston Hall. 

The custom is to the eldest son. 

'Feet of Fines, 8 Rich. II. 8. 3 She was buried at Sutton, and her will 

Fine, Mich. 27-28 Eliz. is dated 28th Sept. 1687. 

* Ipswich Journal, rgth June, 1847. 



SUTTON. 273 

MANOR OF PISTRIES OR PETTISTREE. 

A fine was levied of this manor in 1456 by Sir Philip Wentworthe, 
Robert Wylughby, Robert Wyngefelde, Thomas Drewes, Gilbert Debenham, 
John Heydon, Reginald Rous, William Jenney, Walter Fulburne, Richard 
Chirche, William Boundis, Thomas Kene, John Prylle, Thomas Warde, 
John Kempe, and John Dod, of Woodbridge, against John Tymperley and 
Margaret his wife. 1 The fine mentions the manors also of Osmonds and 
Talvis. 

The manor was held in the time of Hen. VII. by Thomas Alvard, or 
Alverd, and Margery his wife, jointly of the Earl of Surrey as of the Castle 
of Framlingham, by fealty and rent 65., and of Lady Elizabeth Wingfield, 
as of the Manor of Sutton, by fealty and 4^. rent. At this time it was 
referred to as a tenement called " Pistrees," with 52 acres of land, 8 of 
pasture, 7 of meadow, and 80 of heath, and was said to be worth 5 marks. 
Thomas Alverd died, and Margery survived. She died 4th Jan. 1492-3, 
and the manor went to her son and heir, Thomas Alverd, then aged 
thirty- two.' 

Thomas Alverd the son died in 1505, when the manor passed to his son 
and heir, Thomas Alverd, and a fine of this manor and the Manor of 
Osmond's was levied against him in 1533 by Sir Thomas Russhe and others. 3 
Thomas Alverd died I2th February, 1534-5,* when the manor went to his 
daughters and coheirs Anne, wife of Richard Holdich, and Margaret 
Alverd, who later married William Latton, 5 or Letton. William Latton 
and Margaret his wife were seised of a moiety of the manor in fee tail in 
right of his wife. They levied a fine in 1548 by virtue whereof he became 
seised in tail, and they had issue one John Latton. William died, and 
Margaret remarried Richard Alexander. A fine was levied in 1552 by 
Anthony Aldbroughe against the said Richard Alexander alias Milward, 6 
and in 1565 the said Richard Alexander and Margaret his wife levied a fine 
and settled a moiety on Richard and Margaret for lives with remainder 
to the use of the said Richard for 60 years, remainder to use of trustees, 
John Kettle and John Walker, and the heirs of John Kettle as to the manor 
called Ipswich, Alverd's otherwise St. Peter's, to use of Paul Alexander, 
eldest son of the said Richard and Margaret in tail, with remainder to use 
of Henry Alexander, younger son of the said Richard and Margaret in fee, 
(Ptail) remainder to use of Augustine Alexander, son of the said Richard 
and Margaret, in tail, with remainder to John Latton, son and heir 
of the said William Latton deceased, in tail male, remainder to Richard 
and Margaret in tail male, with remainder to right heirs of the said 
Margaret ; and as to residue of manors after death of Richard and 
Margaret and term of 60 years to use of Augustine Alexander in tail, with 
remainder to the said Henry Alexander in tail, with remainder to the said 
Paul Alexander in tail, with remainder to the said John Latton in tail 
male, with remainder to the said Richard and Margaret in tail male, 
with an ultimate remainder to the use of the right heirs of Margaret for 
ever. 7 

1 Feet of Fines, 34 Hen. VI. 13. 'See Manor of Bavents, in Rendlesham, in 

'I.P.M., 9 Hen. VII. 909. Loes Hundred. 

'Fine, 2 vol. Mich. 25 Hen. VIII. 'Fine, Mich. 6 Edw. VI. 

4 I.P.M., at Ipswich, loth July, 35 Hen. 7 Plowden, Rep. 461, 462. 

VIII. 69. 

LI 



274 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

The following fines are in support of the devolution of title shown 
in the report cited. 

In 1549 by Richard Alexander against William Letton and others of 
a moiety. 1 

In 1565 by John Kettell and others against Richard Alexander of a 
moiety." 

In 1574 by William Burwell against John Holdyshe and others. 3 

In 1587 by John Eyston and others against Margaret Alexander, 
widow, and others. 4 

In 1589 by William Burwell against Paul Alexander and Dorothy his 
wife. 5 

Under the last fine in 1589 the manor was acquired by William Burwell, 
and from that time has no doubt gone in the same course as the 
Manor of Fenn Hall, in Sutton. 

Pettistree Hall is a fine old mansion in the Elizabethan style, now 
occupied as a farm house, having lost many of its external ornaments. 
Near the hall is an extraordinary cherry tree, 15 feet round the trunk and 
120 feet round the tree, and as much as 18 cwt. of fruit has been gathered 
from it in one year. 

OSMOND'S MANOR. 

This was the lordship, according to Davy, of Peter Osmond, but he 
gives no date. 

In the time of Hen. VI. Walter Fulborne had three parts of a fee here, 
" formerly Peter Osmund," and in the same reign John Timperley seems to 
have held the manor. 

In the time of Hen. VII. the manor was held by Thomas Alverd, and 
passed to his widow, Margaret Alverd, who died in 1492-3, after which the 
manor devolved in the same course as the Manor of Pistries, in Sutton. 
It is specifically included in the inquis. p.m. of Thomas Alverd, who died 
i2th February, 1534-5,' and in fines levied of a moiety of the manor in 1549 
by Richard Alexander against William Letton and others ; 7 in 1552 by 
Anthony Aldbroughe against Richard Alexander alias Milward ;' in 1587 
by John Eyston and others against Margaret Alexander, widow, and others;* 
and in 1589 by William Burwell against Paul Alexander and Dorothy his 
wife." 

Under this last fine, no doubt, the manor was acquired by the said 
William Burwell, and subsequently passed as the Manors of Fennhall and 
Pettistree, 



'Fine, Easter 3 Edw. VI. 'I.P.M., 35 Hen. VIII. 69. 

'Fine, Mich. 7 Eliz. 'Fine, Easter, 3 Edw. VI. 
'Fine, Mich. 16 and 17 Elir. 'Fine, Mich. 6 Edw. VI. 

4 Fine. Hil. 29 Eliz. 'Fine, Hil. 29 Eliz. 

'Fine, Hil. 31 Eliz.; Add. Ch. 25412. '"Add. Ch. 25412. 




UFFORD. 275 

UFFORD. 

I WO manors existed here in Saxon times. The first was 
held by Almar, a freeman under commendation, half of 
Edric and half of the Abbot of Ely. It consisted of 60 
acres, 4 bordars, i ploughteams, 4 acres of meadow, and a 
mill, valued at IDS. At the time of the Survey it was held 
of Robert Malet by Gilbert de Wishant, and some details 
had changed. There were 2 bordars only and half a team, 
though the value remained the same.' 

Another estate of Robert Malet here consisted of 25 acres, 2 acres of 
meadow, and a ploughteam, valued at 45., which had been formerly held 
by nine freemen, all under Edric's commendation except two, who were 
under commendation of the Abbot of Ely." Robert Malet had two other 
smaller holdings here, one of 6 acres, valued at I2d., formerly held by a 
freeman under Edric's commendation ; and the other of 8 acres and i 
acre of meadow, included in the valuation of Dennington, formerly held 
by a freeman also under Edric's commendation. 3 

The second manor was held by Almar, a freeman in the time of the 
Confessor, under commendation, half of Edric and half of the Abbot of 
Ely. It consisted of 60 acres, 4 bordars, i ploughteams, 4 acres of meadow, 
and a mill, valued at los. When the Survey was taken the manor was 
held by the Abbot of Ely, there being then but 2 bordars and half a team. 4 

The abbot also held here nine freemen under commendation of Almar 
(except two, who were under the abbot's commendation). They had 
25 acres of land, 2 acres of meadow, and a ploughteam, valued at 45. 5 

Roger Bigot had here 3 acres and 2 acres in Loudham, valued at i2d., 
formerly held by a freeman under Norman's commendation. 6 

The last estate mentioned was that of a freeman under the Abbot of 
St. Edmund's commendation in the time of the Confessor, consisting of 
24 acres and 2 acres of meadow, also a ploughteam, valued at 55. It 
belonged to the abbot at the time of the Survey. 7 

UFFORD MANOR. 

This was the estate of Almar, a freeman under the protection partly 
of Edric and partly of the Abbot of Ely, at the time of the Survey, and was 
held by Gilbert de Wishant of Robert Malet. 

In the early part of the I3th century the manor was held by John de 
Peyton, son of Reginald de Peyton, and passed to John's 2nd son, Robert 
de Ufford, Chief Justice of Ireland in the time of Hen. III. and Edw. I. 
He married Mary, widow of William de Say, and died in 1298,' when the 
manor went to his son, Sir Robert de Ufford, Knt., summoned as a Baron 
1308 to 1311. He married Cecily, one of the daughters and coheirs of Sir 
Robert de Valoines, Knt., lord of Walsham, and died in 1316. On the 
Close Rolls in 1317 is an order to the escheator to deliver to Cicely, Sir 
Robert's widow, a third of three parts of a knight's fee in Ufford (held by 
Petronilla de Holebrok), which the King had assigned as dower. 10 

1 Dom. ii. 324, 3246, 325. 6 Dom. ii. 3436. 

'/&. 7 Dom. ii. 3716. 

3/6. I.P.M., 26 Edw. I. 32. 

4 Dom. ii. 388. 'I.P.M., 10 Edw. II. 76. 

5/6. '"Close Rolls, 10 Edw. II. 13. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



From the death of Robert de Ufford in 1316 to the death of Margery 
Willoughby in 1515 the manor passed in the same course of descent as the 
Manor of Parham Hall, in Plomesgate Hundred. The manor is specifically 
mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Robert de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, in 1360, 
and an extent given,' and is also included in the inquis. p.m. of William de 
Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, and Joan his wife in 1381.' 

Amongst the Harleian Charters is a licence for waste in the manor in 
1400 ;' a conveyance of the manor in 1417, as mentioned in the account of 
Parham Hall Manor ;* and the grant of a rent charge of 40 out of the manor 
and other hereditaments in favour of Sir William Oldhalle, Knt., and 
Margaret his wife, sister of Robert, Lord Willoughby, for their lives. 5 The 
manor is also specifically mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of Isabella, wife 
of William Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, in 1417 ; of Sir Robert Willoughby in 
1465,* and of Robert, son of Sir Robert Willoughby, in 1467.' 

William Willoughby (son of Sir Christopher, who died in 1498) held the 
manor, which was assured to him by Sir Edmund Jenney, pursuant to the 
terms of his father Christopher's will by deed dated the i8th June, 8 
Hen. VIII. [1516];' on the death of his mother Margery, who died i6th 
May, 1515," and died in 1525, when it passed to Lady Mary Willoughby 
for life, and then to his only daughter and heir Catherine, who had livery 
in 1534. She married ist Charles Brandon, Duke of Suffolk, and andly 
Richard Bertie. 

In 1548 the manor was vested in Sir William Willoughby, Knt. Lord 
Willoughby, of Parham, nephew of the last-mentioned William Willoughby, 
from whom it passed in 1574 to his son and heir, Charles, Lord Willoughby, 
who in 1602 sold the manor to Sir Michael Stanhope, Knt., who in 1608 
sold the same to Robert Barker, serjeant-at-law. On Robert Barker's 
death in 1618 it passed to his son and heir, B. Barker, who the following 
year sold to Geoffrey Pitman, on whose death in 1627 the manor passed to 
his grandson, Geoffrey Burwell, who held his first court 26th July, 1627. 
The manor was shortly afterwards purchased by Henry Wood, who held 
his first court i8th Dec. 1641, and from this time to the time of Robert 
Oneby in 1747 the manor descended in the same course as the Manor of 
Blythford, in Blything Hundred, and Dunningworth, in Plomesgate 
Hundred. Charles Wood held a court the 24th May, 1742. 

From Robert Oneby this manor came in like manner as the lordship 
of Staverton, in Eyke, in Loes Hundred, to Sir John Chapman. Henry, 
Earl of St. Albans, and others held a first court i6th April, 1672, and Thomas 
Wood, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, 2ist April, 1681 ; while Caesar, 
late Cranmer, held his first court loth Aug. 1692. The 3rd March, 1786, 
Thomas Breton and others as heirs of Oneby held a first court, and shortly 
afterwards in fact, the following year sold the manor to Jacob Whit- 
bread, who held his first court for the manor 3Oth August, 1787. 

This Jacob Whitbread was the only son of Ive Whitbread, 4th son of 
Henry Whitbread, elder brother of Samuel Whitbread, the brewer. He 
married Anne Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob Hinde, and had a son, Jacob 



9 

' I.P.M., 43 Edw. III. pt. ii. 38. 
I.P.M., 5 Rich. II. 57. 
J Harl. 55 H. i. 
Harl. 58 B. 13. 
' Harl. 57 A. i. 
I.P.M. >4 Hen. V. 48. 



'I.P.M., 5 Edw. IV. 35. 
8 1.P.M., 7 Edw. IV. 37. 
Harl. Ch. 52 B. 10. 

"I.P.M., at Woodbridge, 6th Oct. 7 
Hen. VIII. 



UFFORD. 277 

Whitbread, of Loudham Park, who married Louisa, daughter of Samuel 
Michell, Lord High Admiral of the Portuguese Navy, and died at Rio, 
2Oth January, 1809, in the lifetime of his father, leaving with other issue 
Jacob William Carey Whitbread. Jacob Whitbread, the purchaser 
of this manor, died in 1829, when it passed to his grandson, the said Jacob 
William Carey Whitbread. He married Ellen Belfield, 3rd daughter of 
Christopher Farwell, of Totnes, Major in the Fourth Dragoon Guards, 
and had four sons and two daughters. His eldest son, Jacob Gordon Carey, 
died without issue in 1848, and on his father's death in 1875 the manor 
passed to his 2nd son, Colonel Howard Whitbread, C.B., of Loudham Park. 
He married in 1864 Louisa, elder daughter of S. Fyson. 

We find the manor mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of John Garveys, 
who died i8th August, 1538, leaving John, his son and heir, 1 and in 1542 
we meet with a claim by the Crown on Sir Nicholas Hare for forfeiture of 
' Ufford Manor,"* the manor being also mentioned in the inquis. p.m. of 
Sir Michael Hare, who died 3ist October, 1557, leaving Margaret, his 
daughter and heir, aged 28.' 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings in the time of Queen Elizabeth 
we find a claim by descent of Henry and Thomas Symons against Anthony 
Stricklond and Charity his wife as to messuages in Ufford, part freehold 
and part held of this Manor of Ufford ; the freehold part claimed by plaintiff 
Henry as eldest son and heir, and the copyhold part by Thomas as youngest 
son according to the custom of descent in the said manor. 4 

A little later we meet with a Chancery action brought by William 
Warner against Alice Richeman, widow, touching lands in Dennington and 
Fressingfield, and copyhold of this manor. 5 

There are some miscellaneous papers relating to Ufford Manor in 1603 
amongst the Additional MSS. in ihe British Museum. 6 Sir Michael 
Stanhope was called upon to show title to the manor in 1605. 7 

Customs : The youngest son is heir A heriot is due Dower to the 
wife one-third Right of fishing in the river Curtesy of England Licence 
to cut trees necessary. 

Arms of WHITBREAD : Argent, a chevron between three hinds' heads 
erased, Gu. 

MANOR OF SOGENHO. 

Under the head Sigenhoe, which is the name of a manor in Ufford, we 
find in the Survey mention of an estate of 20 acres and half an acre of 
meadow, valued at i6d., amongst the possessions of Robert Malet, the same 
having been held in Saxon times by a freeman under Edric's commendation. 

Robert de Ufford held this manor with the main manor, and died seised 
of it in 1298, and since that time it has descended in the same course of 
devolution as the main Manor of Ufford, except that we cannot speak 
absolutely as to devolution between the purchase of this manor by Robert 
Barker in 1608 and the sale of the same to Henry Wood in 1641. The 
manor is included in the licence granted by King Hen. VI. in 1439 to Sir 
Robert Wylughby to assign the castle and manor of Orford and the Manor 

1 1.P.M., 33 Hen. VIII. 130. 4 C.P. iii. 115. 

"Memoranda, 34 Hen. VIII. ; Trin. Rec. 'C.P. ser. ii. B. cxciv. 16. 

Rot. 21. 'Add. 23967. 

I.P.M., 4 and 5 Phil. & Mary 31. 7 Memoranda, 2 Jac. I. Hil. Rec. Rot. 136. 



THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

of Wykes Ufford, held of the King in chief, to Sir Thomas Combirworth, Knt., 
Robert Sheffield, John Langholm, Thomas Fitz \Yilliam, John Stayndrape, 
and Robert Foranan. The licence is dated ist Oct. 18 Hen. VI. 

It is also included by name in the assurance from Sir Edmund Jenney 
in execution of the will of Christopher, Lord Willoughby, to his son, 
William, Lord Willoughby D'Eresby, i8th June, 1516.' 

It is now vested in Colonel Sir Howard Whitbread, C.B., of Loudham 
Park, Woodbridge. 

The Right Rev. Thomas Wood, Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry, a 
younger brother of Sir Henry Wood (the purchaser of this manor in 1641), 
in his lifetime erected a hospital for ancient and indigent men and women 
in this parish ; and by his will, dated in 1690, charged his Manor of Barham, 
in this county, with the payment of 30 per annum, for the support of eight 
ancient poor men in Ufford and Wickham Market, to be equally divided 
amongst them, each to have a gown every two years with the letters H. W. 
upon their shoulders ; and he willed that the repairs of the hospital and 
the charges of the gowns should be provided out of the said lands. The 
hospital in this parish contains four apartments, which are occupied by 
four poor men, belonging to the same parish, appointed by the feoffees. 
The yearly sum of 15, which is paid by Joseph Birch Smyth, of Ipswich, 
Esq., the owner of the Manor of Barham, is received by the poor men in 
the hospital, and they are each supplied at Mr. Smyth's expense with a coat 
once every two years. The hospital is kept in repair by Mr. Smyth, and 
is at present in good condition. 2 

MANOR OF UFFORD SUTTON. 

A Manor of Ufford is included in a fine levied in 1352 by Thomas de 
Aspale against John de St. Philibert, Knt., 3 but we cannot say with certainty 
that this manor is the one indicated. 

In 1566 this was the lordship of William, Lord Willoughby, of Parham, 
and on his death in 1574 passed to his son and heir Charles, 2nd Baron 
Willoughby, of Parham, who in 1602 sold the same to Sir Michael Stanhope. 
Sir Michael in 1608 sold to Robert Barker, serjeant-at-law. We have 
adopted Davy's statement as to this, but it seems doubtful whether Sir 
Michael Stanhope ever had this manor. The fine under which Robert 
Barker in 1598 acquired is rather suggestive of a conveyance to him directly 
from the Willoughby family. 4 On Robert Barker's death in i6i8, 5 the 
manor went to his son and heir, B. Barker, who in 1639 so ^ to Sir Geoffrey 
Burwell, Knt., grandson of Geoffrey Pitman. In 1641 the manor was 
acquired by Sir Henry Wood, and from this time to the present the manor 
has passed in the same course as the main manor, and is now,4n fact, one 
of the members thereof. 

MANOR OF OTLEY'S. 

The first lord of whom we have any account is Roger or Robert Otley, 
who is handed down to fame as father of one of the 1 6 or 20 Lord Mayors 
which the County of Suffolk has furnished to the greatest commercial 
centre in the universe. Roger Otley was succeeded in the lordship in 1433* 

1 Harl. 52 B. 10. 5 See Bavent Manor, Combs, in Stow 

1 Page, Hist, of Suffolk, p. 160. Hundred. 

'Feet of Fines, 26 Edw. III. 10. 6 I.P.M., n Hen. VI. 43. 

4 Robert Barker v. W. Willoughby and 
others. Fine, Easter, 40 Eliz. 



UFFORD. 279 

by his son and heir, William Otley, who was Lord Mayor of London in 1434. 
In 1554 a fine was levied of the manor by John Staphen against J. Lane 
and others. 1 It included lands in Ufford, Melton, and elsewhere. We 
meet with another fine in 1598 levied of this manor ; it is by W. Glover and 
others against John Father and others. 2 Thomas Mills subsequently held by 
marriage. He died in 1703, and left this manor and other estates to 
trustees for charitable purposes, and in 1705 Jasper Goodwin, Francis 
Kilderlee, James Moor, Edward Kew, Robert Capon, William Revans, 
and William May hew as feoffees held their first court. The manor is still 
in the trustees of this charity. 

MANOR OF KETTLEBURGH UFFORD. 

The site of the Manor of Kettleburgh Ufford is in the parish of Ufford. 
The courts used to be held at the last house on the left-hand of the turnpike 
road after passing the bridge in going from Ufford Upper Street toward 
Wickham Market. 

This was the lordship of Ralph de Ufford in 1315. In the time of 
Edw. IV. it became vested in Sir Robert Willoughby, Knt., and from that 
time to 1641, at least, the manor passed through precisely the same 
hands, and has had the same course of devolution as the main Manor of 
Ufford. The only matter additional (and it is quite possible this is no 
variance from the actual devolution of both manors) is that in 1627 this 
manor was vested in John Bennett, of Washbrook, and in 1705 in Peter 
Bell. 

The manor, under the name of " Ketylbare," was included in an 
assurance dated i8th June, 1516, from Sir Edmund Jenney, Knt., to William, 
Lord Willoughby D'Eresby, pursuant to the terms of the last will of 
Christopher, Lord Willoughby, William's father. 3 Sir Nicholas Hare, 
Knt., Master of the Rolls, died seised of this manor 3ist Oct. 1562. 4 

By his will dated 26th Sept. 1557, he leaves his Manors of Woodbridge 
Ufford and Kettleburgh Ufford, and all lands, &c., purchased of Lord 
Willoughby and others, to the heirs male of his body . This manor passed 
accordingly to his son and heir, Michael Hare, who by his will dated 2Oth 
July, 1609, gave all his manors, lands, &c., to his brother, Robert Hare, 
for his life, and after his decease to Nicholas Timperley and his heirs. 

The Rev. James Worsley was lord i8th March, 1831. 



1 Fine, Mich. 2 Mary I. 3 Harl. 52 B. 10. 

'Fine, Easter, 40 Eliz. 4 I.P.M., at Ipswich, 20th Dec. 5 Eliz. 




280 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

WICKHAM MARKET. 

MANOR was held here in Saxon times by Atser, a freeman 
under Edric's commendation. It consisted of 33 acres, a 
bordar, 3 acres of meadow, and a ploughteam. At the time 
of the Survey Ranulph held it of Hervey de Berri, and the 
ploughteam had disappeared. Under this freeman two free- 
men held 8 acres and half a ploughteam, which had also disap- 
peared at the time of the Survey, when the value was 6s. 

as against the Saxon valuation of IDS. Of this estate William Malet was 

seised at the time of his death. 1 

There were several other holdings in this place. One was that of a 
freeman under Edric's commendation, consisting of 12 acres ,the estate at 
the time of the Survey of Earl Alan. 2 

Two other estates were held at the time of the Survey by Robert 
Malet. One consisted of 16 acres, valued at i2d., formerly held by four 
freemen under Edric's commendation, the other was formerly the estate 
of four freemen (over two the Abbot of Ely had half commendation and 
Robert Malet's predecessor half), consisting of 29 acres and a ploughteam 
(reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey), valued at 40^.' 

Another estate was that of a freeman consisting of 2j acres, valued at 
4^., held at the time of the Survey of Roger Bigot by Norman. 4 

Another estate was' held by Roger Bigot over a freeman formerly 
under commendation to the Abbot of Ely, with 25 acres. Under him were 
four freemen with 7 acres, a ploughteam (reduced to half a team at the time 
of the Survey), and 2 acres of meadow, valued at 55. When the Survey 
was taken this estate was held by Ralph de Savigni of Roger Bigot as of 
the fee of the Bishop of Bayeux. 5 

The only other estate here was held by a freeman under Haldein's 
commendation, consisting of 3 acres valued at 6d. At the time of the 
Survey it was held by Geoffrey de Magnaville. 8 

There is an entry under Horpole, in Loes Hundred, which probably 
referred to the Manor of Horpole, in this parish. Earl Alan had 8 acres 
in demesne here. 7 

WICKHAM MARKET MANOR OR WICKHAM WITH THE MEMBERS. 

In 1275 this was the lordship of Robert de Ufford, Chief Justice of 
Ireland, and passed from him to William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, who 
died in 1381, in the same course as the main Manor of Ufford in this 
Hundred. Upon the death of the Earl, Sir Roger de Boys, Knt., John 
Ryeshall, clerk, Robert de Ashfield, Roger de Wolferston, and Thomas de 
Wroxham, granted the manor to Campsey Priory,' where it continued until 
the dissolution of that house. The licence for enabling the grant to be 
made to the priory will be found on the Patent Rolls in 1383.' 

The 3Oth Oct. 1538, the manor, together with Gelham and Bynge Hall, 
was granted by the King to Sir Anthony Wingfield in tail male, "and a 

' Dom. ii. 443. 7 Dom. ii. 294. 

Dom. ii. 2936. I.P.M., 6 Rich. II. 201, Extent. 

'Dom. ii. 3246. "Pat. Rolls, 7 Rich. II. pt. i. 39. 

4 Dom. ii. 3436. IO S.P. 1538, ii. 734 (26); Pat. Rolls, 30 

Dom. ii. 3736. Hen. VIII. 2, 16. 

Dom. 11.412. 



WICKHAM MARKET. 281 

fine was levied of the manor against him in 1551 by Thomas Wentworth, 
Lord Wentworth, and others. 1 The fine included also the Manors of Hor- 
pole and Gelham in Wickham Market. Sir Anthony died 2Oth Aug. 1552,' 
from which time the manor descended in the same course as the Manor of 
Dallinghoo, in Loes Hundred, until the death of Sir Henry Wingfield in 
1677, the only additional particulars or variations being that in 1582 Sir 
Robert Wingfield had a grant of fairs and a market here, and in 1611 on 
the death of Sir Thomas Wingfield, this manor passed to Sir Ralph Winwood, 
Knt., Prime Secretary of State, during the minority of Anthony, son and 
heir of Sir Thomas Wingfield, and that he held a first court in 1617, 
Elizabeth, Lady Winwood, widow of Sir Ralph, holding a court in 1618. 

Amongst the Exchequer Special Commissions in the Public Record 
Office, in 1614 we find a statement that this manor and Gelham Manor 
were granted in 30 Hen. VIII. to Anthony Wingfield, and were supposed 
to be escheat on account of defective title. 3 Sir Anthony Wingfield 
died seised of the manor 30th July, 1638.* 

Sir Henry Wingfield sold the manor to William Nassau, ist Earl of 
Rochford, from which time the manor has devolved in the same course as 
the Manor of Easton, in Loes Hundred, to the present time, and is now 
vested in the trustees of the i2th Duke of Hamilton, who died in 1895. 

The manor is included in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Robert Wingfield in 
1596, Anthony Wingfield being his son and heir ; also in the inquis. p.m. 
of Sir Anthony Wingfield, 1605, Sir Thomas Wingfield being his brother 
and heir ; also in the inquis. p.m. of Sir Thomas Wingfield, 1610, when 
Anthony was found to be his son and heir ; also in that of Sir Anthony 
Wingfield, Bart., in 1638, when Sir Robert Wingfield, Bart., was found to 
be his son and heir. 

MANOR OF HARPOLE OR HORPOLE. 

A manor was held here in Saxon times by Huna, a freeman under 
Edric, consisting of 100 acres, 4 bordars, i ploughteams (reduced to i team 
at the time of the Survey), 5 acres of meadow, 8 hogs, and 30 sheep, valued 
at 2os. When the Survey was taken this manor, still of the same value, 
was held of Robert Malet by his mother. 

There were also here 10 freemen under Edric's commendation in the 
time of the Confessor. 3 Robert Malet also held here a freeman having 3 
acres, valued at 'jd., and 15 acres, half a ploughteam, and an acre and a 
half of meadow, valued at 55., formerly held by a freeman named Bond, 
under half commendation to Edric. This Robert Malet's mother also 
held at the time of the Survey. 6 

Among the lands of Earl Alan was an estate of 12 acres here, formerly 
that of a freeman under Anand's commendation. 7 

Another estate was that of Roger Bigot, formerly that of Algar, a 
freeman under Stigand's commendation, consisting of 10 acres, valued 
at 2S. When the Survey was taken Ranulf son of Walter held it of Roger 
Bigot." 

' Fine, Easter, 5 Edw. VI. 5 Dom. ii. 3246, 325- 

I.P.M., 13 April, 7 Edw. VI. 6 Ib. 

J Exch. Spec. Com. n Jac. I. ; D.K.R. 38, 7 Dom. ii. 2936. 

App. p. 94. * Dom. ii. 3436. 
*I.P.M., at Ipswich, 7th Sept. 14 Car. 

MI 



282 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Among the lands of the Abbot of Ely at the time of the Survey were two 
estates in this place. The first was formerly that of two half -freemen, and 
consisted of 23 J acres, valued at zod., and the second formerly that of a 
half-freeman under the abbot, consisting of 15 acres and half a ploughteam 
(which had disappeared at the time of the Survey), valued at 35.' 

Hervey de Berri had two estates here at the time of the Survey. The 
first was held by Odo, a freeman formerly under commendation half to 
the Abbot of Ely and half to Edric. It consisted of 16 acres, valued at 35. 
The second was formerly held by a freeman under Edric's commendation, 
and consisted of 5 acres and half an acre of meadow, valued at I2d* 

The manor in the time of Hen. III. belonged to the Hovel family. 
Robert Hovel, of Wyverston, held it in 1225, and it devolved in the same 
course as the Manors of Wyverston, in Hartismere Hundred, and 
Weston Market, in Blackbourn Hundred, until the reign of Rich. II. 

In 1258 a fine of a third part of this manor was levied by Ada, " late 
wife of Hubert Hovel," against Robert Hovel, senior, 3 and in 1268 we learn 
from the Abbreviation of Pleas that there was an action this year by Hugo 
de Dunsterre and Alice his wife against this Robert Hovel and Eleanor 
his daughter, because they " deforced " from lands here of which they were 
seised in the " beginning of the late war in spite of a decree by the King 
and council that all who faithfully adhered to him during the said war 
should have seisin of the lands they held at its outbreak." 4 On the Patent 
Rolls in 1281 we meet with an action by Eleanor, daughter of Robert Hovel, 
against Bartholomew de Davelers touching a tenement here, 5 and in 1318 
a fine was levied of the whole manor by Stephen Hovel and Matilda his 
wife against John de Westwyk, junior. 6 

A claim was made by Robert, son of Hugh de Hovel, and Joan his 
wife to lands in Wickham Market in 1332. 

In 1378 another fine was levied by Sir John de Sutton and Thomas 
Munchensy against John Crulle and Alice his wife. 7 

In 1389 licence was granted to Sir Roger Boys, Thomas C . . . . ch. 
Robert Gregge, clerk, Robert de Ashfeild, Robert Hotot, Thomas de 
Wroxham, clerk, and Robert de Rendlesham to grant the manor to Campsey 
Priory. 8 On the dissolution of the priory the manor passed to the Crown, 
and in 1537 the King levied a fine of this manor and of the Manors of Gelham 
Hall, in Wickham Market, and of Beng and Valence Manors, against " The 
Master and Chaplins of St. Thomas the Martyr within the Priory of 
Campesse." 9 

In 1538 the King granted the manor to Sir Anthony Wingfield, from 
which time it has apparently passed in the same course as the main Manor 
of Wickham Market. In 1572 Sir James Wyngfelde was called upon to 
show title to the manor. 10 

GELHAM OR GELHAM HALL MANOR. 

We have referred to a manor of this name as in Elveden, in Lackford 
Hundred, and from the parties interested in the time of Edw. III. it is 
obviously the same manor. 

'Dom. ii. 388. 'Feet of Fines, n Rich. II. 21. 

Dom. ii. 443. *Pat. Rolls, 13 Rich. II., pt. in, 27; 

'Feet of Fines, 42 Hen. III. 63. Extent I.P.M. 13 Rich. II. 106. 

Abbr. of Pleas, 52 Hen. III. East 2. "Fine, Hil. 29 Hen. VIII. 

'Pat. Rolls, 9 Edw. I. 12 ; see also 6 "Memoranda Rolls, 14 Eliz. Hil. Rec. 

Edw. I. id., 8 Edw. I. ryd. Rot. 81. 
Feet of Fines, 12 Edw. II. 20. 



WICKHAM MARKET. 383 

A fine was levied of a third part of this manor in 1359 by William 
Hastyngg and William Wynter against John de Reppes, junior, and 
Elizabeth his wife/ and in 1362 of a sixth part of the manor by Peter Rolfe, 
of Elveden, clerk, against William de Scothowe and Elizabeth his wife. 2 

In 1373 William de Ufford, Earl of Suffolk, held this lordship, and 
released all his right to Adam de Hauttrys and others. Shortly afterwards 
we find the manor in the Priory of Campsey, where it continued until the 
suppression of the religious houses. 

In 1538 the manor was granted to Sir Anthony Wingfield in tail male. 3 
He died in 1552, and from that time to the present the manor has passed 
in the same course as the main Manor of \Vickham Market, and Easton, in 
Loes Hundred, and is now vested in the trustees of the late Duke of 
Hamilton. 

We find that in 1572 Sir James Wyngfelde was called upon to show 
title to the manor. 4 

Amongst the Chancery Proceedings we find an action for the perform- 
ance of an agreement by Thomas Jennings against Sir Robert Wingfield 
and others as to this manor, stated to be the inheritance of defendant 
Wingfield agreed to be demised to the plaintiff. 3 



The following entries under Wilford Hundred in the Domesday Survey 
we are not able to distinguish with certainty : 

HALGESTON. (?) 

An estate here was held in Saxon times by Godric, Edric's socman, 
who could neither give nor sell, consisting of a carucate of land, 20 acres, a 
villein and bordar, 2 ploughteams (reduced to i at the time of the Survey), 
and 2 acres of meadow ; also a mill, the value being 175. qd. At the time 
of the Survey it was held of Robert Malet by his mother, and the value 
was unchanged. 6 

HUNDESTHOST OR HUNDESTUF IN WANGFORD. 

A holding here at the time of the Survey was that of William, of Robert 
Malet, consisting of two freemen under commendation, with 22 acres, 
valued at zs. /\d. 7 

And in the same place at the time of the Survey the Abbot of Ely had 
an estate, consisting of 6 acres of land, valued at i2d. In Saxon times 
this was held by a freeman, the abbot having commendation. 8 

LANEBURGH. 

Robert Malet had three estates here at the time of the Survey. The 
first was formerly that of a freeman under Edric's commendation, with an 
acre of land. The second was formerly that of Brictmar under commenda- 
tion to Edric, consisting of 5 acres, valued at izd. It was held by Walter 
of Malet at the time of the Survey. The third was formerly that of three 

'Feet of Fines, 33 Edw. III. 23. 5 C.P. ii. 102. 

'Feet of Fines, 36 Edw. III. 20. *Dom. ii. 3186. 

3S.P. 1538, ii. 734 (26). 7 Dom. ii. 3246. 

4 Memoranda, 14 Eliz. Hil. Rec Rot. 81, 'Pom. ii. 3876. 



284 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

freemen under Edric's commendation, and consisted of 30 acres, a bordar, 
ij ploughteams (reduced to half a team at the time of the Survey). The 
value was los. (increased to 125. at the time of the Survey). 1 

LlTTLECROSS. 

Robert Malet had an estate here at the time of the Survey. It formerly 
was held by 7 villeins, and consisted of 40 acres, 2 ploughteams (reduced to 
i at the time of the Survey), and 3 acres of meadow, valued at 55. (increased 
to los. at the time of the Survey). Robert Malet held the soc from the 
King.' 

THURSTAN'S TOWN al. THURSTANTON 
(possibly in Hawkedon, in Risbridge Hundred). 

A manor was held here in Saxon times by six freemen under Godric's 
commendation, consisting of 40 acres, and 2 ploughteams (reduced to i 
at the time of the Survey), valued at xos. The Domesday tenant was 
Ralph de Bellafago. 3 

Another estate here was that of a freeman under Ailric's commendation, 
consisting of 6 acres, valued at I2d., at the time of the Survey, held by 
Robert de Glanville, of William de Warren. 4 There was yet another estate 
here in Saxon times of three freemen under Edric's commendation, consist- 
ing of 4$ acres, which estate at the time of the Survey was held by Robert 
Malet. 5 

WlLFORD. 

There were four estates here in Saxon times, three of which were held 
at the time of the Survey by Robert Malet. The first had been the estate of 
JEdi, a socman under Edric's commendation, and consisted of 60 acres, 4 
acres of meadow, 2 bordars, a ploughteam, which, however, had disappeared 
at the time of the Survey. It was valued at i6s., and at the time of the 
Survey, when held in demesne by Robert Malet, at los. It was a league 
long and half a league broad, and paid in a gelt i&d. 6 

The second had been the estate of a freeman under Edric's commenda- 
tion, and consisted of 2 acres, valued at 4^., while the third consisted of 
30 acres, belonging to Hollesley, and in its valuation/ 

The fourth estate was held at the time of the Survey by Norman of 
Roger Bigot, and had formerly been held by a freeman under Norman's 
commendation. It consisted of 7 acres and half an acre of meadow, 
valued at 1^.' 



THE END. 



'Dora, ii. 317, 3186. 'Dom. ii. 317. 

'Dom. ii. 318. 6 Dom. ii. 318*. 

'Dom. ii. 354. ? Dom. ii. 325. 

4 Dom. ii. 4006. 'Dom. ii. 341*. 



INDEX 



OF 



HOLDERS OF MANORS, 

Where there are at least two generations, specifying the first and last holder 

in each family, with dates. 



CONTRACTIONS. 
a Arms. 

+ Full account of family. 
= Married. 

B. & C. Bosmere and Claydon Hundred. 

C. & C. Carlford and Colneis Hundred. 

N.B. Dates are usually from earliest to latest given in the 
account whether purchased or inherited. 

Where a devolution has ended in a daughter and been 
continued through that daughter in another family, the surname 
of the person married has been given, and where the devolution 
has ended in coheirs, the one through whom the manor has 
passed (either by devise or on partition) has been named. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 



Abbott, Rich., to son Math., 1637. Stansfield Hall, Cavendish, 

Babergh. 

Abergavenny. See Overhall, Otley, C. and C. 

+Acton, Bapt. Lee, 1722, to Lord De Saumarez. Lawshall, Babergh, 
and Livermere Parva, Blackbourn, and Brokes Hall, 
Nacton, C. and C., and Greenwich, Ipswich, by reference 
to Lawshall. 

a + John, d. 1662, to Lord De Saumarez. Baylham, B. and C., 
partly by reference to Lawshall, Bramford and 
Norman's in Bramford, B. and C., by reference. 
1675, to Nath. Lee, 1796. Illarius, East Bergholt, 

Samford. 

Nath. 1764, d. 1795, to Exors. of Nath. Lee. Clay don, B. and C. 
Lee, d. 1768, to Lord De Saumarez. Gt. Livermere, 

Thedwestry, by reference to Lawshall. 
Wm. 1596, d. 1616, to Lord De Saumarez. Trickell's and 

Wey lands, Bramford, B. and C. 
1715, to Nath., 1745. St. Margaret's, Crettingham, 

Loes. 

a +Adair, Alex., 1809, d. 1836, to now. Cratfield Le Roos, Blything, 
and Westhall and other manors in Westhall, Blyth- 
ing; Greeting St. Clare and Ringshall, and Charles Hall 
and Rawlins and Rockells, in Ringshall, B. and C.; 
Naunton, Cosford; Mendham Priory and Mendham, 
Kingshall and Shotford Hall, in Mendham, and 
Wingfield and Wingfield Old Hall in Hoxne, all by 
reference to Cratfield Le Roos. 
>, J 835 to about 1880. Depden, Risbridge. 
Sir F. R S., only now. Syleham Comitis, Hoxne. 
Sir R. S., 1855 to now. Wolney Hall, Mickfield, B. and C., by 

reference to Cratfield Le Roos. 
Wm., 1787, to Wm., 1853. Monewden, Loes. 
1787, to now. Redingfield, Hartismere, by reference to 

Cratfield Le Roos. 

I 753> to now. South Elmham and Newhall and Saint 
Cross in South Elmham, and Flixton and Boyes in 
Flixton, and Homersfield and Limbourne in Homers- 
field, Wangford, by reference to Cratfield Le Roos. 
a Affleck, John, d. 1718, to now. Dalham, Risbridge, and Abbotts 
Denham, Gazeley, and French Hall, Moulton, Risbridge, 
by reference. 
Afleton, Jeffrey, t. Rich. I., to sis. Agnes =Broughton. Hemingstone, 

B. and C. 

Aguellis or Agneaus, Sir Rich., 1210, to John, 1298. French Hall, 
Moulton, Risbridge. 






288 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Aguilon, Sir Robt. de, to dau. =Poynings. Smallbridge, Bures, 

Babergh, and Tany's, Bures. 
Wm. de, /. Hen. III., to Sir Robt., 1286, dau. =Bardolf. 

Bures, Babergh. 

Alan, ist E. of Britanny, to John de Dreux, E. of Rich., 1280. 
Nettlestead, B. and C., and Chillesford, Plomesgate, 
by reference, and Wissett le Roos, Blything, by 
reference to Nettlestead. 

to Constance, d. 1201. Rumburgh, Blything. 
., d. 1093, to son Alan. Spexhall, Blything. 
Humph. Fitz, i4th E. of Arund., d. 1438, to sis. Amicia = Butler, 

Moreves, Gt. Waldingfield, Babergh. 

Albemarle, t. Will. I., to dau.Hawise,i Mandeville, 2 Fortibus. Clop-ton 
Hall, C. and C., and Amor Hall, Gt. Belstead and 
Harkstead, Samford, by reference. 
Countess, d. about 1085, to Stephen, E. of, d. 1126. 

Chadacre, Shimpling, Babergh. 
Earl of, now. Wykes, Bardwell, Blackbourn. 
Albini, Wm. de, to Amabil =Tattershall. Cratfield, Blything. 
Albricus, Walter, to Roger t. Hen. I. See Huntingfield, Blything. 
Albrincis, Hugh, E. of Chester, 1070, to son Rich., d. 1120. Hales- 

worth, Blything. 

Alcock, Edm., d. 1491, to dau. Margery = Poley. Badley, B. and C. 
Aldhani, John, d. 1562, to Thos., 1635. Sapiston and Sapiston 

Grange, Blackbourn. 
d. 1574, to grandson, John Cove. North Cove, 

Wangford. 

Aldis, John, 1797, to son, John Thos., 1807. Hasketon Hall, C. and C. 
Alen, John, 1569, devised to Thos. Twyne. Methold's Glemsfordand 

Callis Glemsford, Babergh. 
Alexander, Jas., about 1644. Dagworth, Stow. 
a Thos., 1687, to Hen., 1742. Cransford, Plomesgate. 

Aleyn, John, 1403, to dau. = Clopton. Coddenham Hall, Boxford, 

Babergh. 

Algar, Lucy, 1253, to son Cramaville. Brockley Hall, Thingoe. 
Algate, Sam., 1651, to niece Eliz. = Clench. Wortham Hall, Hartis- 

mere. 
Alington, Jas., d. 1626, to neph., Sir Giles. Bures, Milden and Maister's 

in Preston, Babergh. 

a Wm., 1423, to Hildeb., 5th Lord, 1706. Halesworth, Blyth- 
ing, and Newmarket, Lackford ; Gisleham Hall, Mutford, 
and Withersfield, Risbridge, by reference. 

Allin, Sir Thos., d. 1686, to Anguish and Reeve. Ash by, Lothingland, 

and Belton ; Blundeston Hall and Gunville's in Blundeston ; 

Caxton Hall in Bradwell ; Corton and Norton Corton, 

Flixton, and Lawney in Flixton ; Fritton, Gorleston, 

Lothingland, and the 4 Leets in Lothingland ; Lound, 

Stalham in Lound, Lowestoft, and Somerleyton, all in 

Lothingland ; and Carlton Hall and Bromholm Priory in 

Carlton Colville and Mutford, all in Mutford, by reference. 

a Allmot, Thos., to dau. Kath. = Clench. Greeting All Saints, B. and C. 

Alneto, Wm. de, /. Hen. III., to son Adam, 1282. Onehouse, Stow. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 289 

a Alston, Edw., and family, to Thos., 1785. Sayham Hall, Newton, 

Babergh. 

1615, to Mary, 1662. Shelland, Stow. 
Jos., d. 1625, to bro. Overtye, Bramford, B. and C. 
Pet., d. 1628, to Edw., 1632 (?). Rev. E. C., 1855. Lovetot, 

Bramford, B. and C. 

a Wm., d. 1749, to son Wm. Bildeston, Cosford. 
Alverd, Thos., 1533. Bavent's, Rendlesham, Loes. 

,, t. Hen. VIII., to Thos., d. 1534. Pistries, Sutton, 
Wilford, and Osmond's in Sutton, by reference. 
See too Falkenham, C. and C. 
1535, to dau. Margaret = Latton. Bromberry, 

Helmingham, B. and C. 

Amoundeville, Robt., to Marg. = Fastolf, 1350. Okenhill Hall, Bading- 

ham, Hoxne, and Mandeville, Sternfield, Plomesgate. 

Amyas, John, to son, Rev. John, 1793. Henstead, Ely thing, and 

Blundeston in Henstead, by reference thereto. 

Andrew, Wm., 1364, to Margaret, 1438. Netherhall, Cavendish, Babergh. 
Andrews, Giles, 1648, to John, 1725. Hitcham, Cosford. 

John, to granddau. Eliz. = Windsor. Baylham, B. and C. 

and Darmsden, B. and C., by reference. 
Wm., t. Hen V., to Thos., 1420. Stoke Hall, Ipswich. 
a Angervile, Robt., 1204, to Roger, 1345. Dangeviller, Sproughton, 

Samford. 

Anguish, Edm., 1774, to dau. Anne =Raper. Clopton Hall, C. and C., 
and Brendhall, Rouse Hall, and Wascolies, all in Clopton, 
by reference thereto. 

Thos., d. 1810, to neph. Osborne. Ashby, Lothingland, and 
Belton, Blundeston Hall and Gunville's in Blundeston, 
Caxton Hall, Bradwell, Gorton and Newton in Corton, 
Flixton and Lawney in Flixton, Fritton, Gorleston, 
Lothingland, and the 4 Leets therein ; Lound and Stalham 
in Lound, Lowestoft and Somerleyton, all in Lothingland ; 
and Carlton Hall and Bromholm Priory, both in Carlton 
Colville and Mutford, in Mutford, by reference. 

Anos or Haines, Geoff, de, to dau. Margery, t. John =Creke. Helming- 
ham Hall, B. and C. 

Ansell, Jos., 1843, to son Robt., 1868. Vaux, Wenham Parva, Samford. 
Anstruther, Capt. J. H. L., 1838, to Col. R. H. L. now. Hintlesham, 

Samford, and Mauser, Hadleigh, Cosford, by reference. 
Apadams, Sir John, 1322, to Thos., 1331. Monewden, Loes. 
Appleton or Appulton, Hen;, 1590, to Hen. 1621. Leyham, Cosford. 
to Wm., 1625. Kettlebaston, 

Cosford. 
a John, 1416, to Sir Isaac, 1609. Holbrook Hall, Little 

Waldingfield, Babergh. 
Thos., 1. Eliz., to Isaac, about 1620. Methold's, Glemsford, 

Babergh and Callis in Glemsford. 
Thos., t. Eliz., to Isaac, about 1630. Lynnes, Edwardstone, 

Babergh and Tewes in Edwardstone, by reference. 
Thos., 1581, to Sir Ralph, 1683. Churchford, Capel St. 

Mary, Samford. 
Wm., 1509, to Eliz. = Ryches, Hunston, Blackbourn. 

Ni 



290 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Apthorp, Robt., 1425, to Margt. and Eliz., 1499. Allthorpe's, Gazeley, 

Risbridge. 

Arcedeckne, Chaloner, 1791, to Lord Huntingfield, 1897. Glevering 
Hall, Hacheston, Loes. See Kettleburgh and Kenton 
in Kettleburgh and Letheringham, Loes. 
Archdale, 1594, d. 1598, to John. Abbot's Darsham, Blything, and 

Gerrard's in Darsham, by reference. 
Archer, Raym. le, to Beatrice, 1384 = Roos. Archer's, Flowton, 

B. and C. 

Arderne, Ranulph, 1275, to Wm., 1314. Withersdale, Hoxne. 
to son Thos. Harleston, Stow. 

Thos., 1220, to dau. =Buttrey. Little Blakenham, B. and C. 
/. John. Bawdsey, Wilford. 

Argent, Wm., 1268, to John, 1344. Argents, Stutton, Samford. 
a Argentine, Reg., t. Rich. I., to Eliz., 1423 =Alington. Halesworth, 
Blything, and Newmarket, Lackford, and Gisleham Hall, 
Mutford, by reference. 
Armiger, John, 1585, to son Edw., 1609. Newton Hall, Swilland, 

B. and C. 

Arras, Wm., about noo, to dau. Emma, 1120. Redlingfield, Hartismere. 
a Ashburnham, John E. of, 1755, to now. Badley, B. and C., and 

Barking B. and C., and Columbine Hall, Stow- 
market, Stow, by reference to Badley. 
Ashe, Wm., 1411, to dau. Eliz. -Frowyke. Little Cornard, Babergh. 

See too Pecock's Hall, Little Cornard. 
Ashfield, John, d. 1394, to son Robt. Stanton St. John in Stanton All 

Saints, Blackbourn. 

d. 1409, to 2 daus. Exning, Lackford. 
Sir John, 1626, to Sir John, 1714. Netherhall, Harkstead, 

Samford. 

Robt., 1375, to Sir Robt., 1569. Master Stephen's, Hep- 
worth, Blackbourn. 
d. 1401, to Robt., 1614. Little Haugh, Norton, and 

Stowlangtoft, Blackbourn. 

a 1543, d- 1546, to John. Hunston, Blackbourn. 
a Aslack, Wm. Willingham, Wangford. 
a Aspal, Roger de, d. 1312, to Kath. = Thorpe c. 1350. Stonham Aspall, 

B. and C 
Thos de, d. 1365, to granddau. Mirabel = Gedding. West 

Stow, Blackbourn. 
Aspale, Geoffrey, d. 1287, to J Joan, d. 1415, = Thorp, and John 

Drury, d. 1498. Cowling, Risbridge. 
John, 1360, to Mirabel = Gedding, 1365. Little Bradley, 

Risbridge. 
Sir Robt., to Margaret =Felbrigg, c. 1350. Aspal, Mildenhall, 

Lackford, by reference to Stonham Aspall. 

Sir Thos., 1350, to granddau. Mirabel = Gedding. Lackford, 
Thingoe, and Flempton, Thingoe, by reference to Lackford. 
Aspin, Rev. H., 1767, d. 1791, to sis. Dorothy = Acton. Peper's, Cock- 
field, Babergh. 
Astley, Hubert, 1683, to son Hobart (doubtful). Weybread Hall, 

Hoxne. 
Astrey, Rev. Fran., 1754, to Robt. Shelland, Stow. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 291 

Atkinson, Sam., d. 1718, to Eliz. Rolph = I Wilkinson, 2 Thompson. 
Seckford, Great Bealings C. and C. 

Auberville, Roger de, t. Wm. I., to son Hugh. Elmsett, Cosford. 

Sir Roger, to Sir Wm., t. Hen. III. Arden's, Gt. Fin- 
borough, Stow. 

+ Sir Walter, c. 1200, to Joan Criol. Benhall, Plomesgate. 

Wm., t. Wm. I., to Peter. Rockells, Ringshall, B. and C. 

Audley, Hugh de, d. 1347, to Edw., Duke of Buckingham, 1521. 

Desning Hall, Risbridge, mainly by reference to Cavenham, 

Lackford. 

Jas. Lord, c. 1450, to successors. Carlton Hall, Carlton 

Colville, Mutford. 

to John, 1544. Middleton, Blything. 

John, 1489, to son, Sir Edw., 1534. Rouse Hall, Clopton, 

C. and C. 
Sir John, d. 1530, to son Edw. Redhall, Witnesham, C. and 

C., and Swilland, B. and C. 

,, Sir Thos., 1538, to dau. Margaret = D. of Norf. Desning Hall 
and other manors in Gazeley, Risbridge, and Sharde- 
lowe's, Cavenham, Lackford. 

a Thos., 1564, to Hen., 1704. Gt. Barton, Thedwestry. 
Aula Combusta, Robt., t. Hen. III., to Nich. t. Edw. III. Brentha, 

Clopton, C. and C. 

Austin, Chas., 1845, to now. Brandeston, Loes, and Cretingham 
Tyes, Loes, by reference, and see Monewden, Loes, and Fenn- 
hall, Sutton, Wilford. 
Austyn, John, t. Edw. I., to Thos. (?), 1428. Austin's, Middleton, 

Blything. 
Aylesford, E. of, 1748, to 4th Earl. Gazeley Rectory and Withersfield, 

Risbridge. 

Aylmer, John, Bp., to Sam. Brampton, Blything. 
a 1586, to grandson Edw., 1661. Akenham and 

Clay don, B. and C. 
Ayton, John, d. 1806, to Ayton, d. 1836. Earl Soham, Loes. 



B 

Babington, Uriah, 1605, to son's widow Anne. Falkenham, C. and C. 
Bacon, Edm., 1280, to Sir Edm., d. 1356. Oulton, Lothingland. 

Sir Edm., t. Hen. VIII., to dau. Frances, 1676 = Narborne. 
Brandeston Hall, Great Waldingfield, Babergh. 

Edm., 1642, to Letitia =Wodehouse, d. 1759. Chilton, 
Babergh. 

Edw., d. 1618, to Rev. Nich., d. 1795. Shrubland, Barham, 
B. and C. 

Francis, 1584, to Nath., 1670. Virles, Sternfield, Plomesgate. 

,, George, 1544, to Thos. 1586. Netherhall, Pakenham, Thed- 
westry. 

James, 1573, to Nath., 1680. Friston, Plomesgate, and 
Bovile's and Peche's, Alderton, Wilford. 



292 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Bacon, John, 1426, d. 1462, to 3 granddaus. Banyards, Spexhall, 

Blytliing. 
about 1450, to Eliz. and Eleanor. Baynard's, Tunstall, 

Plomesgate. 
d. 1558, to son George, 1603. Hickling Hall, Parham, 

Plomesgate. 
Sir Nicholas, 1540, d. 1579, to Sir Nath., d. 1627, wid. Jane = 

CornwaUis. Ingham, Blackbourn. 

a + Bacon, Sir Nich., 1545, to Sir Edm., 1650. Hinderclay Blackbourn, 

and Rickinghall Inferior, Blackbourn, Redgrave and 
Falcon Hall, Rickinghall Superior, and Wortham 
Abbotts and Wyverstone, Hartismere, and St. 
Andrew, Ilketshall, Wangford, by reference to 
Hinderclay. 

to Trustees of Robt., d. 1652. Shipmeadow, Wang- 

ford. 
1553 and 1570, to son, Sir Nath., 1579, d - l6 27- 

Combs, Stow, and Timworth, Thedwestry. 

d. 1579, to Sir Edm., gth Bart. Acton, Babergh. 

4th Bart. Mettingham, 

Wangford, by reference to Hinderclay. 
to Sir Robt., Bart., 1695. Churchhouse, 

Walsham, Blackbourn. 

to Sir Rich., 5th Bart , 1685. Blackbourn. 

to Philip, d. 1635. Bramfield and Brooke 

Hall in Bramfield, Blything. 

ist Bart., 1586, d. 1624, to Sir Nath., d. 1660. Cul- 

ford, Blackbourn, and East Hall in Culford, 
by reference. 
d. 1666, to Sir Edm. y Bart., d. 1758. Wickham 

Skeith, Hartismere. 

,, 1675, to Rev. Nich., 1789. Talvies, Shottisham, 

Wilford, and Sutton Hall, and Stokerland, and 
Woodhall in Sutton, Wilford, by reference. 
Philip, d. 1635, to dau. Anne = Bedingfield. Woolverstone, 

Samford. 

Sir Robt., 1325, to Isabel = Calthorp. Erwarton, Samford, 
and Thorington Hall, Samford, by reference, and Davillers, 
Pettistree, Wilford, by reference to Erwarton. 
Thos., 1540, to Eliz., 1653 = Walpole. Hessett, Thedwestry. 
c. 1500, to daus. Swefling, Plomesgate. 
d. 1547, to great-grandson, Edm. Troston, Blackbourn. 

See too, Denney's, Coddenham, B. and C. 
Badele, Sir Geoffrey, 1240, to son John. Badley, Gt. Waldingfield, 

Babergh. 

a to Wm., 1426. Badley, B. and C. 

a Robert de, t. Hen. II. (?), to Robt. Brokes, Ipswich. 
Badeley, Gill, d. 1815 to dau. Sophia d. 1839. Creeping Hall, 

Stutton, Samford. 
a Badlesmere, Lord d. 1322, to Sir Thos., Lord Roos, gth Baron, 1460. 

Bradfield Combust, Thedwestry. 

,, 1320, to Margt. Tibetot. Barrow, Thingoe. 

a Badley, t. Hen. III., to Wm., 1424. Badley, B. and C. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 293 

Badwell, Thos., to dau. Anne = Poley, t. Rich. II. Boxstead Hall, 
Babergh. 

Bainard, Ralph, t. Will. 1 , to Wm., t. Hen. I. Shimpling, Babergh ; 
Cratfield and Henham and Wangford, Blything ; 
and Kedington and Poslingford Hall, Risbridge, 
by reference. 

a Baker, Sir Rich., d. about 1618, to grandson Thos. Whittingham 

Hall, Fressingfield, Hoxne. 

Sam., 1664 d. 1700 to Anne Robina, d. 1747 = Tompson. 
Wattisfield, Giffard's in Wattisfield, Blackbourn. 

Baldrey, or Baldry, Sir Wm., about 1500, to granddau. Eliz. = Rich. 
2nd Baron. Boyton, Milden, Babergh. 

Baldry, Geo., d. 1540, to dau. Eliz. = Rich., 2nd Baron. St. Bar- 
tholomew, Tuddenham, C. and C. 

John, 1781, to J. Stow B. Oakenhill Hall, Badingham, 
Hoxne. 

Baldwin, Wm., 1814, to son Wm. Peper's, Cockfield, Babergh. 

Baliol, John, 1238, to John, 1296. Gorleston and Lowestoft, 
Lothingland. 

Banyard, Rich., 1406, to Margt. = Bacon. Cransford, Plomesgate. 

Barantyn, or Barington, Drugo, d. 1416, to wid. Christiana = Manyng. 
Frostenden, Blything. 

Barber, , d. 1655, to son John, 1677. Marlesford, Loes. 

Roger, 1579, to grandson Edm., 1686. The Grange, Bury. 

Barbour, Nich., 1561 to Will, about 1650. Chepenhall, Fressingfield, 
Hoxne. 

Bardolf, Sir Hugh, 1286, to Isabel, 1312. Bures, Babergh. 

John, 1351, to Thos., Lord B., 1407, to Sir Wm. Philips. 
Ilketshall Bardolf, Wangford, partly by reference to 
Clopton Hall. 
a ,, John, Lord, d. 1363, to Sir Wm., d. 1424. Clopton Hall, 

C. and C., and Dennington, Hoxne, by reference. 
Barct, Eliz. 1798 to dau. Lydia, 1826. Burgh Castle, Lothingland. 
Baring, Alex;, 1822, to Alex. Hugh, 4th Bart. Ashburton, 1868. Thet- 

ford, Lackford. 
a Barker, Edm., 1611, to Eliz., 1744 = Lynch (Blosse). Peasenhall, 

Blything. 
Francis, d. 1734, to dau. Eliz. = Lynch. Colston Hall, 

Badingham, Hoxne, by reference to Peasenhall. 
John, 1587, to Sir Thos., 1615. Bavent's, Combs, Stow. 
a + 1588, to Sir John Fitch, 7th Bart., 1766. Offton 

Monks, Offton, B. and C. 

d. 1609, to grandson, Sir Thos. Battisford, B. and C. 

1680, d. 1696, to Sir John Fitch, 7th Bart., d. 1766. 

Walton, C. and C., by reference to Grimston Hall. 

to Sir Wm., 2nd Bart, (a younger branch), d. 1746. 

Ringshall, B. and C., and Charles Hall, Rawlins 

and Rockell's in Ringshall, by reference. 



294 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Barker, Robt., 1598, to son B., 1639. Ufford Sutton, \\ ilford and 

Sogenho in Ufford, by reference thereto. 

., 1597, d - I6l8 to Sir John Fytch, 7th Bart., d. 1766. 

Russell's, Falkenham, Grimston Hall and Morton 
Hall and Stratton, all in Trimley St. Martin, and 
Candelent in Trimley St. Mary, and Felixstow, 
C. and C , by, reference to Offton Monks, Offton, 
B. and C. 
al. Chapman, about 1550, to Edm., 1582. Bull Hall, Bedfield, 

Hoxne. 
Barnard, Wm., to Margaret, = i Whetstone, 2 Browne. Mary 

Bramford. Rous Hall, Akenham, B. and C. 

Barnardiston, Nath., 1837, to now. Alpheton, Babergh, and Thorn- 
don Parva, Hartismere, Staverton, Eyke, 
Loes, and Wantisden Hall, Plomesgate, by 
reference. 

1805, to now. Bromeswell, Wilford, by refer- 

ence to Staverton and Alpheton. 

+ Sir Sam., ist Bart., 1663, to Anna Maria, 1737, = Shaw. 

Brightwell, C. and C., and Foxhall and Waldring- 
field and Rivershall in Waldringfield, C. and C., 
and Wick Bishop, Ipswich, by reference to 
Brightwell. 

a + Thos., 1347, to Sir Sam. d. 1735. Kedingtor., Risbridge 

1543, to Cath., wid. of Sir Sam. Wratting 

Magna, Risbridge, by reference to Kedington. 

to dau. Eliz. Wyverstone, Hartismere. 

,, 1548, d. 1557, to son, Sir Thos. Cornerth Hall, 

Bures, Babergh. 
a Barne, Miles, d. 1780, to Miles, now. Sotterley, Wangford. 

1754, d. 1780, to neph. Fred., 1837. The Temple, 

Dunwich, Blything. 
Barningham, Eustace de, about 1400, to daus. of Geoffrey, d. 1411. 

Barningham, Blackbourn. 
Barrett, Rev. Wm., to W. C., 1847-1885. Netherhall, Pakenham, 

Thedwestry. 

Barrington, Elliston, to dau. Mary = Mills. Argent's, Stutton, Samford. 
Sir John, 1375, to Thos., 1562. Barrington's, Westhall, 

Blything. 

Barrow, Maur., 1628, d. 1666, to cousin Maur. Shelton. Barningham 
and Coney Weston, Blackbourn, and Netherhall, 
Barningham, by reference. 

Thos., to son Wm., 1591. Acton, Babergh. 
a 1543, to Maur., 1666. Newton Hall, Babergh, and 

Morefes, Gt. Waldingfield, Babergh, and Westhorpe 
Hall, Hartismere, and Raydon Hall, Samtord and 
Sulveyes in Raydon, by reference. 
a Barthropp, Nath., d. 1790, to Nath., 1526. Blomville's, Hacheston. 

Loes. 
Base, Benj., about 1650, to son John. Hurt/, Saxmundham, Plomes 

gate (?). 

a Thos., about 1600, to John, 1653. Benhall, St. Roberts, 
Plomesgate. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 295 

Bassett, Ph., 1243, to dau., Alicia = Bigot, E. of Norf. Euston, 
Blackbourn, and Kersey, Cosford. See too Swan's, 
Saxmundham, Plomesgate. 
Rev. Wm., to son W. C., 1857. Netherhall, Pakenham, 

Thedwestry. 

Bateman, Lady, now. Thelnetham, Blackbourn. 
a Robt., t. Hen. IV., to Thos., 1583. New Hall, South 

Elmham, Wang ford. 
Thos., 1485, to Thos., 1588. Saint Cross, South Elmham, 

Wang ford. 
W., d. 1659, to Wm., 1745. Oakenhill Hall, Mendham, 

Hoxne. 

,, See also Kerrison. 

Bates, Martin, 1591, to Thos. Russell's, Wilby, Hoxne. 
Bavent, Adam, d. 1285, to Rog., 1352. Bavent's, Combs, Stow. 
to Hawise, 1360. Brandeston, Gt. Waldingfield, 

Babergh. 

Thos., 1263, to Wm., 1346. Easton Bavent, Blything. 
1339, to Thos., 1362. Bavent's, Chediston, Blything. 

Baxter, Steph., 1560, to Dorothy, d. 1661 = Bohun. Dale Hall, 

Whitton with Thurlston, B. and C. 

about 1620, to Gardner. Mendham Priory, Hoxne. 

Bayles, John Bryle, d. 1588, to Thos., 1591. Russell's, Wilby, Hoxne. 

a Baynard, Geoff., about 1400, to gt.-granddau. Margaret, 1426 = 

Bacon. Banyards, Spexhall, Blything. 
Hen., to 2 daus. Burghard's, Spexhall, Blything. 
Robt., 1428, to Margaret = Bacon. Baynard's, Tunstall, 

Plomesgate. 

Bayning, Paul, 1616, to Anne, d. 1659. Laxfield Rectory, Laxfield, 
Hoxne, and see Banyards and Burghard's, 
Spexhall, Blything. 

1611, to Anne, 1638 = Vere. Rumburgh, Blything. 

Bayspoole, Robt., 1573, to dau. Eliz. =Devereux. Lound, Lothingland. 
Beachcroft, Matt., 1814, to now, F. P. Wiston, Babergh. 

1820, to now, Francis. Kettlebaston, Cosford. 

Robt., 1689, to Matt., 1821. Preston Hall, Babergh. 
a Beale, Barth., d. 1724, to dau. = Alston and Biand, about 1749. 

Bildeston, Cosford. 
Thos. B., about 1850, to trustees of will, 1889. Brettenham, 

Cosford. 
Beauchamp, John de, d. 1343, to dau. Cecilia, 1361 = Turburvyle. 

Little Haugh, Norton, Blackbourn. 

Rich., E. of Warwick, d. 1438, to Anne, Countess of 

Warw., 1471. Blaxhall Hall, Plomesgate, and 
Burwash, Witnesham, C. and C., by reference 
thereto. See also Lidgate, Risbridge. 

Roger,d. ante 1200, t. Hen. III. 1253. R fi de Hall, Thingoe. 

Sir Wm., 1297, to dau. Joan = Chyverston. Walding- 

field Parva, Babergh. 
Wm., d. 1410, to granddau. Eliz. = Nevill. Overhall, 

Ottley, C. and C., and Worlington, Lackford. 
a Beaupre, Nich., 1491, to Edm., 1517. Brockley Hall, Thingoe. 






296 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Beaumont, C., now. Botelers, Newton, Babergh. 

Rev. Chas., d. 1756, to dau. Eliz. = Broke, d. 1822. Bond, 

Freston, Samford. 

a Eliz., 1641, to son John. Tattingstone, Samford. 

a + Sir Geo., yth Bart., to now, isth Bart. Haverhill, Risbridge, 

and Hersham and Helions in Haverhill, by reference 
thereto. 

Geo. Fred., now. Cockfield and Earl's Hall in Cockfield, 

Babergh, Rumburgh, and Westleton Grange, Blything. 

a John Vise., 1447, to son Wm., 1460. Clopton Hall, C. 

and C. 
Jos., d. 1889, to Geo. Fred. now. Glemsford, Babergh, 

and Mettingham, Blything. 

a Beauvoir, Rich., B. de, 1824, to R. B. Berens, 1889. Culford, Black- 
bourn, and East Hall, in Culford, and Ingham, 
and West Stow, and Wordwell, Blackbourn, and 
Timworth, Thedwestry, by reference. 
Beche, Wm. de la, 1321, to dau. Eliz., 1361 = Elmrugge. Fakenham 

Magna, Blackbourn. 

Beck, Edw., 1835, to Mrs., 1837. Brasin's, Creting St. Peter's, Stow. 
Bedall, Matth., 1610, to Thos., 1674. Herringfleet late Priory, Lothing- 

land. 

Bedford, Edw., 1885, to John. 1896. Little Bricett, B. and C. 
+ Bedingfield, Sir Adam, 1300, to Edm., 1562. Hesteley, Thorndon, 

Hartismere. 
+ Anth., 1649, to Mary, 1782. Swarts Hall, Gislingham, 

Hartismere. 
Edm., t. Hen. VIII. , to gt.-grandson, Sir Henry. Scots, 

Martlesham, C. and C. 
to Sir Hen. Denham, Hoxne, and then by reference 

to Bedingfield Hall. 

1536, to Francis, 1636. Redlingfield, Hartismere. 

1689, to dau. Eliz., d. 1720 =-= Fremoult. Rives- 

hall, Hepworth, Blackbourn. 
Sir Hen., d. 1546, to Sir Hen., 1592. Charsfield, Loes, 

by reference to Brandeston. 

a+ 1553, to Trustees of Sir Hen., 7th Bart., now. 

Bedingfield, Hoxne, and Denham, Hoxne, by 
reference. 
+ Jas., d. 1435, to Philip, 1660. Flemings, Bedingfield, 

Hoxne. 

+ Margaret, 1461, to Edm., 1585. Gt. Bealings, C. and C., 

and Brandeston, Loes, and Nowton Hall, 
Swilland, B. and C., and Eriswell and Nether- 
hall in Tuddenham, Lackford, by reference. 
1461, to Edm., d. 1502. Shardelowes, Caven- 

ham, Lackford. 
d. 1475, to grandson, Sir Edm. Knettis- 

hall, Blackbourn. 

to John, about 1585. Cotton, Kedington, 

Risbridge. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 297 

Bedingfield, Margaret, to Sir Hen., 1660. Eriswell, Lackford, and 

Chamberlain in Eriswell. 
to Sir Edm., 1528. Grundisburgh Hall, C. and 

C., by reference to Gt. Bealings. 

to Thos., 1582. Kesgrave, C. and C., by refer- 

ence to Gt. Bealings. 
to Anth., 1552, Westerfield, B. and C., by 

reference to Brandeston. 

Peter, d. 1371, to Edm., d. 1583. Minsmere, Westleton, 

Blything, by reference to Hesteley Hall, and from 

Edm., d. 1583, to Sir Harry, 1609, by reference to 

Bedingfield Hall, Hoxne. 

Sir Thos., d. 1538, to bro. Robt. (?). Tuddenham, C. 

and C. 

Thos., d. 1590, to Margaret, 1702. Flemworth Hall, Eye, 
Hartismere, and then by reference to Bedingfield 
Hall, Hoxne. 

,, 1611, d. 1636, to Philippa = Rous. Darsham, 

Blything, and Abbot's, Austin's and Berrard's 
in Darsham, by reference. 

to son Thos., 1655. Woolverstone, Samford. 

d. 1538, to Sir Edm., 1584. Gosbeck, B. and C. 

See Gt. Belstead, Samford. 
a Beeston, Wm., 1715, to W. B. Coyle, d. 1810. St. Peter's, Ipswich. 

Belet, Sir Ingelbrand, 1300, d. 1312, to son Robt., d. 1322. Shelland, 
Stow. 

Bellomonte, Sir Godfrey, d. 1293, to grandson Rich. 1307. Leveney 
Strattons, and Aveley, Assington and Groton, 
Babergh, Grimston Hall, Trimley, C. and C. 

Sir Geoff., to bro. John. Blowfield, Trimley St. Mary, 

C. and C., and Semer, Cosford. 

Wm., about 1250, to Wm., about 1280. Lindsey, Cosford. 

Bence, Capt. E. S., 1838, to E. S. now. Monks Melford and Kentwell, 
Long Melford and Stanstead, Babergh. See also Heven- 
ingham, Blything. 

a + John, 1620, to H. S., d. 1881, and now coh. Thorington, 
Blything, and Carlton and Kelsale, Hoxne, by reference 
to Thorington. 
Robt., d. 1745, to dau. Anne = Sparrow. Wathe, North Cove, 

Wangford. 
Wm., 1599, d. 1606, to Priscilla, 1686 = i Snell, 2 Wright. 

Cleeve's, Westleton, Blything. 
a Benhall, Robt., 1292, to Sir Robt., about 1400. Benhall St. Roberts, 

Plomesgate. 

Bennet, Thos., 1764, to daus. Coddenham Hall, Boxford, Babergh. 
Bennett, Sir Hen., Lord Arlington, 1665 d. 1685, to dau. Isabella = 

Fitz Roy, D. of Graf ton. Euston, Blackbourn. 
a Phil., 1702, to son Philip. Rougham, Thedwestry. 
a Benstead, Edm. de, 1334, to Wm., 1471. Banstead, Tuddenham, 

Lackford. 
01 



298 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Berdewell, Ralph de, 1097, to Sir Wm., d. 1434. Bardwell and Wykes 

in Bardwell, Blackbourn. 
a .. Robt., i. Hen. VI., to Eliz. - Wotton, 1545. Tostock Hall, 

Thedwestry. 

Thomasin, d. 1599, to son Jas. King's Hall, South Elm- 
ham, Wangford. 
+ Sir Wm., d. 1434, through Harleston, Darcy, Savage, and 

Rivers, 1639. Norton, Blackbourn. 
to Margery = Harleston. Thorpe by 

Ixworth, Blackbourn. 

1397, and Wm., 1403. Ampton, Thedwestry. 

Berens. See Beauvoir. 

a Berkeley, Dorothy, 1710, to Finetta = Mattingley. Wixoe, Risbridge. 
John Sims, to dau. Eliz. = Somerset, 4th D. of Beaufort. 

Brandeston, Gt. Waldingfield, Babergh. 

Sir Thos., about 1635, to dau. Theophila = Coke. Hunting- 
field, Blything. 
Wm., Lord, 1478, to Wm., 1492, possibly to Hen., 1560. 

Kentford, Kedington, Risbridge. 

Berners, Chas., 1815, to now, C. H. Erwarton, Samford, and Chel- 
mondiston and Freston, and Harkstead and Brandeston 
in Harkstead and Holbeck, Samford, by reference. 
J., 1885, to now. Shotley Hall, Samford, by reference to 

Erwarton. 
Sir Ralph, d. 1279, to dau - = Knevitt, t. Hen. VIII. Ick- 

lingham, Lackford. 
Wm., 1773, to now. Woolverstone, Samford, by reference 

to Erwarton. 

Berney, Mich., 1376, to dau. Kath. = Fynden. Wiston, Babergh. 
Bernham, Walter, de, d. about 1231, to son Walter, 1266. Alpheton, 

Babergh. 
t. Edw. I., to son Robt. t. Edw. II. Sotherton, 

Blything. 
Betts, Rev. G., 1805, to K. H., 1907. Wortham Hall, Wortham, 

Hartismere. 

Wm., 1693, d. 1709, to Rebecca = Anguish, 1774. Clopton 
Hall, Clopton, C. and C., and Brend Hall, Rouse 
Hall, and Wascolies, all in Clopton, by reference 
thereto. 

,, 1706, d. 1709, to son Thos., 1736. Halesworth, Blythirg. 
Bigg, Chas., 1795, to Bateman. Gatisburies, Stansfield, Risbridge. 
Bigot, Robt., E. of Norf., 1307, to Margaret, 1362. Ramsholt, Wilford. 
a + Roger, t. Will. I., to 1303. Framlingham, Loes, and Peasen- 

hall, Blything, Earl Stonham, Kelsale, Hoxne; 
Hacheston, Hoo, and Earl Soham, Loes, Dun- 
ningworth, Plomesgate, Kennet in Kedington, 
Risbridge; Bungay, Wangford, and Hollesley, 
Wilford, all by reference to Framlingham. See 
too, Stoven, Blything, and Bromeswell and 
Shottisham Hall, Wilford. 

,. to Mary Countess of Nori. d. 1362: Candelent, Trim- 

ley St. Mary, C. and C., by reference to Fram- 
lingham. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 299 

Bigot, Roger, t. Will. I., to Thos. Howard, 3rd D. of Norf ., 1544. Walton, C. 

and C., by reference to Framlingham. 
,, to son, t. Hen. I. Darsham, Blything, and Offton 

Monks, B. and C. 

1200, to Sir Ralph, d. 1416. Theberton, Blything. 

d. 1220, to Roger, 1298. Wisset le Roos, Blything. 

d. 1270, to Roger. Cratfield, Blything. 

See too Felbrigge. 
Bird, Robt., 1837, to Trustees of Major Bird now. Blunt's Hall, Little 

Wratting, Risbridge. 
Bishop, Thos., 1655, to Thos., 1680. Hesteley Hall, Thorndon, 

Hartismere. See too Thistleden, Burgh, C. and C. 
Biskele, Sir Clement, 1318, to Reg., 1349. Gisleham Hall, Mutford. 

Robt. de, 1316, to Rich., 1349. Frostenden, Blything. 
Blackwell, Susannah, 1793, to Olivers, 1855. Oulton, Lothingland. 
a Blagge, Hen., to Thos. Horningsherth Parva, Thingoe. 

Blagrove, Thos., 1798, to Sir Wm. B. Proctor, Bart., 1838. Greeting 

St. Peter, Stow. 

Blake, Sir Pat., d. 1784, to Sir Pat. now. Bardwell, Blackbourn. 
a to grandson, Sir Hen. Chas., 4th Bart., 

1832. Langham, Blackbourn. 
a Blakenham, Bened., 1202, to Bened., 1298. Chelsworth, Cosford, and 

Lackford, Thingoe, by reference. 

a Blaunchard, Rich., 1317, to John (?) Rich., about 1400. Blaunchards, 

Heveningham, Blything. 

Blennerhassett, John, 1546, to John, 1597. Barsham, Wangford. 
Ralph, 1488, to Sam., t. Eliz. Lowdham, Wilford. 

1423, to Mary, 1587, = Colepepper. Tuddenham, 

Carlford. 

Bliss, Edw., 1828, to Baron Barreto now. Brandon, Lackford. 
Blois, Sir Chas., 1686, d. 1738, to now. South Cove, Covehithe, 

Blything, by reference to Blythburgh. 
Sir Edw., about 1376, to dau. Mary = Howard. Boyses, 

Flixton, Wangford. 

Wm., to son Chas. Debach, Burgh, Wilford. 
d. 1621, to Sir John, 4th Bart., 1771. Burgh Hall and 
Cleve's in Burgh, C. and C., by reference to Blythburgh. 
Sir Wm., 1660, to Sir John, 5th Bart. Abbot's Culpho and 

Grundisburgh Hall, C. and C., by reference to 
Blythburgh. 

to Jane, 1682. Thorpe Hall, Hasketon, C. 

and C., by reference to Blythburgh, and 
Shelton Hall, Stradbroke, and Wilby, Hoxne, 
by reference. 

a + to now, Sir R. B. M., gth Bart. Blythburgh, 

Blything, and Priory, Hinton and Westwood 
in Blythburgh, by reference thereto, and 
Brent Fen, Middleton, and Yoxford and 
Cockfield Hall, Murrill's and Stikingland in 
Yoxford, Blything, all by reference to Blyth- 
burgh. 



300 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Blomeville, Rich., 1478, to Jerome, 1571. Gunton, Lothingland. 
Sim., d. 1633, to grandson John, d. 1696. Wattisham, 

Cosford. 

a to Wm., 1671. Bridge Place, Coddenham, 

B. and C. 

a Blosse, Thos., d. 1580, to Cecilia, 1719. Little Belstead, Samford. See 
also Harrold's, Burstall, Samford. 

Blowers, Geoff., 1544, to Margaret, 1573. Bludhall, Debenham, 
Thredling . 

Blund, Gilb., t. Wm. I., to Wm. Westleton, Blything. 

Robt., t. Wm. I., to son Gilb. Sapiston Grange, Blackbourn. 
1087, to Sir Wm., 1264. Ixworth, Blackbourn, and 

Ashfield Magna, Brett's, Hepworth, and Langham, and 
Walsham, all in Blackbourn, by reference to Ixworth. 

Blundell, Sir Fran., d. 1702, to A. B. S. T. Hill, 3rd Marq. of Downshire. 
Somerton, Babergh. 

a Blundeston, Hen. de, /. Hen. III., to Osbert, 1368. Blundeston Hall, 
Lothingland. 

Blyant, John, d. 1523, to son Rich. Ringshall, B. and C., and Rings- 
field, Wangford. 
Sim.,todau-. Thornham Hall, Hartismere. S^ooWickham 

called Skeiths or Skeith Hall, Hartismere. 
1410, to John, 1486. Campines, Cotton Hempnal, 

Hartismere. 
to son John, Cotton Hempnal, Hartismere. 

Bocking, Edm., 1315, to daus. of Edm., d. 1585. Bocking's, Helm- 
ingham, B. and C., partly by reference to Ashbocking. 
John de, d. 1262, to Philip, d. 1375. Crowfield, B. and C. 
Sir Ralph, 1325, to grandson John. Bocking Hall, Crow- 
field, B. and C. 
1338, to Rich., 1392. Bocking Hall, Winston, 

Thredling. 

Ralph de, 1388, to Cath., 1585 = Bonham, and Frances = 
Hervey. Ashbocking, B. and C. 

Bogas, Roger, d. 1586, to grandson Robt., 1598. Braham Hall, 
Brantham, Samford. 

a Bohun, Edm., 1622, to J. F. B., 1806. Westhall Hall, Blything. 
d. 1638, to grandson Edm. Dale Hall, Whitton with 

Thurlston, B. and C. 
Francis, 1562, to J. F. B., 1806. Barrington, Westhall, 

Blything, by reference to main manor. 
John de 1316, to Joan, 1372. Elmsett, Cosford. 
1320, to 1728. Offton Castle, B. and C., by reference 

mainly to Elmsett and Somerton, B. and C., by 
reference to Offton Castle and Elmsett. 

Nich., 1533, to J. F. B.,i8o6. Empoles and Bavents, in 
Westhall, Blything, mainly by reference to main 
manor. 

Bokele, Alice, to John, 1538. Cleeve's, Westleton, Blything. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 301 

a Bokenham, Edm., 1619, to Tyrrell. Thornham Hall, Hartismere, and 
Swatshall Hall, Gislingham, and Stoke Hall, and Stoke 
Ash with Thorpe, Hartismere, by reference. 
Geo., 1497, to Dorothy, 1551. Furneaux, Whatfield, 

Cosford. 
a Sir Hen., 1609, d. 1648, to Katherine, d. 1743. Weston 

Market, Blackbourn. 
Hugh, 1385, to John, d. 1551. Great Livermere, Thed- 

westry, partly by reference to Thelnetham. 
1399, to Rich., 1721. Thelnetham, Blackbourn, and 

Cressy, Thelnetham, by reference. 
John, d. 1566, to Edm., 1599. Grey's, Great Cornard, 

Babergh. 

d. 1551, to sis. Dorothy. Worlingham, Wangford. 

Thos., d. 1632, to Thos., 1743. Gedding, Thedwestry. 

Wm., 1392, to John, 1447. Bokenham, Hawstead, 

Thingoe. 
Bokyll, John', to great-granddau. Maud, 1435 = Jenney. Buxlow, 

Blything. 

Boldero, Francis, 1582, to son Hen., 1586. Grange, Bury. 
Bole or Bulle, t. Edw. III., to John, 1335. Hesleby Hall, Thorndon, 

Hartismere, and Bull's Head, Yaxley, Hartismere. 
Bolebec, Walter, to granddaus. Gatisburies, Stansfield, Risbridge. 
Bonett, Thos., 1835, t J 853- Cransford, Plomesgate. 
Bonham, Wm., 1600, to Thos., 1676. Ashbocking, B. and C. 
Bordeshawe, Edm. de, t. Hen. III., to Robt, 1275. Boss Hall, 

Sproughton, Samford. 

Bosco or Boys, Arnold, 1275, to 1296. Assington, Babergh. 
Bald, de, t. Hen. II., to granddau. Mutford, in Mutford. 
Robt. de, d. about 1299, to Alice = Howard. Brokes, Ipswich. 
Boston, 3rd Lord, 1808, to 4th Baron, d. 1869. Gisleham Hall, Mut- 
ford, and Pyes in Gisleham, and Kirkley and Pakefield, 
Mutford, by reference. 
a Boteler or Butler, Edm., E. of Carrick, 1309, to 6th E. of Ormond. 

Cantilupes, Gt. Finborough, Stow, 
a Ralph, t. Hen. III., to Sir Philip, 1530. Boteler's, 

Newmarket, Lackford. 
1333, to Jas., E. of Wilts., 1461. Car- 

bonels, Gt. Waldingfield, Babergh. 
to Margery = Crane, about 1429. 

Chilton, Babergh. 

Botetourt, Sir John, 1283, to Joan, 1377. Mendlesham, Hartismere. 
Thos., 1322, to Joyce, 1359 = Burwell. Great Bradley, 

Risbridge. 

Botevilleyn, Sir Wm., 1316, to son Thos. Newton Hall, Babergh. 
a Bothe or Booth, Sir Philip, to dau. Audrey = Lytton. Denney's, 

Coddenham, B. and C. 
Thos., to granddau. Audrey = Lytton. Shrubland, 

Barham, B. and C. 
Wm., about 1450, to great-grandson Philip. Wey- 

lands, Bramford, B. and C. 

Boulers, Bald, de, t. Hen. I., to dau. = Urse. Badmondisfield, Wick- 
hambrook, Risbridge. 



302 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Boundes, Hen., d. 1479, to son Robt. Blundeston, Henstead, Bly- 
thing. 

Bourchier, Anne, d. 1520,10 grandson Andr. Sulyard. Norman's and 
Weylands, Bramford, B. and C. 

Archdeac. of Essex, 1341 only. Wratting Magna, Risbridge. 

Hen., ist E. of Essex, d. 1483, to wid. Isabel. Acton. 

Babergh. 
to grandson Hen., d. 1539. 

Carbonels and Morefes in Gt. 

Waldingfield, Babergh. 

Sir Hen., 1506, to son, Sir John. Cowling, Risbridge. 

Margery, d. 1506, to grandson, Sir John. Icklingham, 
Lackford. 

a+ Sir Wm., 1365, E. of Essex, to Anne =Parre. Hopton, 
Blackbourn, and (a) Bildeston, Cosford, by reference 
to Hopton and Drinkstone Hall, Thedwestry, by refer- 
ence to Bildeston. 

Bovile, John, /. Edw. I., to Sir John and to Carbonel. Dennington, 
Hoxne, by reference to Badingham. 

Wm., t. Wm. I., to - - 1397 = Carbonel. Greeting St. 

Peter's, Stow, by reference to Badingham. 
/. Wm. I. to Margery, 1378 = Wingfield. Thorpe Hall, 

Hasketon, C. and C. 

a about 1216, to John, about 1350. Letheringham, Loes, 

mainly by reference to Badingham and Thorpe Hall. 
about 1250, to Wm., 1309. Alderton and Boulge, 

Wilford. 

1252, to Sir Wm., 1313. Dallinghoo, Loes. 
1275, to Margery, 1324. Badingham Hall and Wilby, 

Hoxne. 
Bower, Robt., to G. H. and J. Wm. Berrard's, Whatfield, Cosford. 

Bowes or Bewett, Sir Wm., d. 1435, to dau. Eliz. = Dacre. Benacre 
and North Ales, Covehithe, Blything and Polfrey in 
Covehithe, and Burgh Hall, Burgh, C. and C., by reference 
to Benacre. 

Boycott, J. H. M., 1885, to F. A. M., 1896. Stapleton's, Kessingland, 
Mutford,andEclinghamand Kingston and Rothenhall in 
Kessingland, by reference. 

a Boyland, Sir Rich., 1284, to Joan, 1371. Bezillers, Stuston, Hartis- 

mere. 
1276 to Sir John. Wright's, Chediston, Blything. 

Boyton, Roger, t. Hen. III., co John, 1428. Netherhall, Old Newton, 
Stow. 

a Wm. de, t. Edw. I., to John, 1345. Boyton, Holton, Samford, 
and Boyton Hall, Gt. Finborough, Stow. 

Braddock, Robt., d. 1812, to great-neph. Little Haugh, Norton, 
Blackbourn. 

Bradfield, Robt. de, 1318, and Margaret his wife. Lee Hoo, Rougham, 
Thedwestry. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 303 

Bragrove, , 1764, to Thos., 1798. Greeting St. Peter's, Stow. 

Braham or Brame, John, ante 1640, to Deborah, 1757. Ash Campsey, 
Loes, and Hacheston, Loes, by reference. 

John, 1650, to Elizabeth, 1788, to Rivett. Valence, Blax- 
hall, Plomesgate, by reference to Ash in Campsey, Loes. 

Wm. de, t. Edw. I., to Eliz., 1478. Braham Hall, Brantham, 
Samford. 

Brampton, Sir Rich., 1299, to son Thos., 1310. Overbury, Leyham, 
Cosford. 

Brand or Brond, Ellis, about 1750, d. 1759, to great-grandson John, 
1803. Thistleden Hall, Burgh, C. and C. 

John, 1591, to Benj., 1627, and again to Ann M. H., 1814. 
Boweshouse, Boxford, Babergh. 

a + 1598, to Eliz., 1674 = Kemp. Edwardstone, Babergh. 
1598, d. 1610, to A. M. H., d. 1814. Polstead, Babergh. 
1611, to Benj., and to Cookes. Semer, Cosford. 
1624, to John, 1638. Cornard Magna, Babergh. 
Rich., to grandson John. Casteles and Newstead in Polstead, 
Babergh.* 

a Thos., 1764, to Vise. Hampden now. Gt. Bradley, Risbridge. 

Brandon, Chas., D. of Suffolk. See Abbot's, Darsham, Frostenden, 

Henham, Huntingfield, Leiston and Thorpe, Blything, 

and Greeting St. Olave, B. and C., and Abbot's Culpho, 

C. and C., and Harleston and Haughley, Stow. 

Eliz., d. 1497, to grandson, Wm. Burnavilles. Levington, 

C. and C. 

Sir Robt., d. 1524, to neph. Chas., D. of Suff. Gyfford's, 
Wattisfield, Blackbourn, Westhorpe Hall, Hartismere, 
and Orford and Markets, Saxmundham, Plomesgate, 
by reference. 

Sir Wm., 1473, to great-neph. Chas., D. of Suff. Craven's, 
Henham, Blything, and Stratton, Trimley St. Martin, 
C. and C. 

Bransby, Thos. or Robt., 1722, to Jas., 1736. Walsham Hall and 

Thorpe Hall, Mendham, Hoxne. 
Braybroke, Sir Roger, 1403, to Blyant. Cotton Hempnall, Cotton, 

Hartismere. 
to Joan, 1438 = Brooke. Harborpugh Hall 

cum Aspall, Debenham, Thredling. 
Bret, Adam le, about 1370, to Edm., 1428. Brett's, Hepworth, 

Blackbourn. 

Breton, Ralph, t. Hen. III., to Mabel, 1275. Cold Hall, Risby, Thingoe. 

+ Breton al. Brito, Robt., 1. Hen. II., to Wm., 1258. Oakenhill Hall, 

Badingham, Hoxne, and Mandeville, Sternfield, Plomesgate. 

a Wm., 1275, to Nich., 1380. Harkstead, Samford, See too 

Buckler's Bond, in Harkstead. 

Bretton, John, d. 1636, to grandson John. Giesning, Debenham, 
Thredling. 

* Correcting error in Vol. I. in the 30th line of p. 182, after the word " Boxford " the 
words " from whom it passed to his son and heir John," are omitted. 



304 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Brewse, Giles, about 1300, to Wm., d. 1489. Redhill, Witnesham, 

C. and C. 

John, 1541, to Alice, 1596. Wicks Ufford, Ipswich. 
+ Sir Rich., d. 1296, to Thomasine, 1489 = Hansard. Hasketon 

Hall, Hacheston, C. and C., and 
Whittingham Hall, Fressingfield, and 
Wingfield Old Hall, Hoxne, by refer- 
ence. 

to Amy, 1489 = Townsend. Akenham, 

B . and C . , partly by reference to Hasketon 
Hall and to Hemmingstone, B. and C. 

to Sir Thos., d. 1482. Rouse Hall, Aken- 

ham, B. and C., by reference to main 
manor. 
a+ Robt., 1486, to Col. John, 1785. Vaux, Gt. Wenham, 

Samford. 
1503, d. 1513^0 son Thos. Bridge Place, Coddenham, 

B. and C. 

to Robt., 1582. Stodhaugh, Wenham 

Parva, Samford, and Wenham Parva 
with a variation. 

Sir Thos. or Wm., 1489. Shardelowes, Little Barton, Lack- 
ford. 
Thos., 1514, to son John, d. 1584. Carlton Hall, Carlton 

Coholle, Mutford. 

to son Giles. Wakelin's, Fressingfield, Hoxne. 

Wm., to dau. Amy =. Townsend. Claydon, B. and C. 
a Brewster, Humph., 1575, to Humphrey, d. 1797. Wrentham, Blything, 
and Northall, Wrentham, by reference thereto. See too 
Henstead, Blything. 
Brian, Ralph Fitz, t. Wm. I., to great-granddau. =Peche. Gt. Bricett, 

B. and C. 

Bridges, Jas., to wid., Lady Jane, about 1760. Gt. Bealings, C. and C. 
Bridgman, , 1610, to granddaus. Eliz., M., and F. J. Coney 

Weston, Blackbourn. 

Wm., 1667, to Orlando, d. 1731. Combs, Stow. 
Bright, John, 1655, to granddau. Sarah = Dawtrey. Little Bricett, 

B. and C. 

a Robt., 1602, to Thos., 1736. Netherhall, Pakenham, Thed- 
westry. 

Brightyeve, John, 1474, to Robt., 1497. Sotherton, Blything. 
Brise, J. Ruggles, 1827, to Col. S. B. Ruggles B. 1855. Overhall, 

Cavendish, Babergh. 
Briseworth, Peter, 1367, to Maud = Dennys, 1414. Tannington, 

Hoxne. 

Wm., t. Edw. III., to dau. Thornham Hall, Hartismere. 
Bristol, Marq. of, Ickworth, Thingoe, and Playford, C. and C.,and 
Depden, Risbridge. See too Gatesburies, Stansfield, 
Risbridge, and Overhall with Netherhall, Shotley, Sam- 
ford, and Whelnetham Parva, Thedwestry, by reference 
to Rushbrook, Thedwestry. See also Hervey. 
Marchioness of, now. Smallbridge, Bures, Babergh. 
Brock, John, d. 1618, to bro. Wm. Old Newton, Stow. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 305 

Brocket, Sir John, 1586, to four daus. Denney's, Coddenham, B. and C. 
Brodie, Sir B. C., Bart., 1839, to son . Sir B. C. Preston Hall, Babergh, 

and Swift's, Preston, by reference. 
Brodock, Sim., d. 1560, to son Alex. Horham, Brodock, late Copledyke, 

Horham, Hoxne. 
Broke, Barth. J., 1610, to Wm., 1630. Southolt, Hoxne. 

Rev. Chas., 1820, to Edw., 1904. Brockley Hall, Thingoe. 

J. W., 18 , to J. K., 1907. Badingham Hall, Hoxne. 

Philip B., d. 1801, to now. Bonds, Freston, Samford, by 
reference to Broke Hall. 

Sir Rich., d. 1529, to son Robt. Culpho, Carlford, and Meer, 
Playford, and Rushmere, C. and C.,by reference 
to Broke Hall, and Bentley Fastolfs, and Langs ton, 
Burstall, Samford. 

,, through Middle tons to Lord De Samaurez. Broke 

Hall, Nacton, C. and C., but partly by reference to 
Lawshall, Babergh. 

d. 1613, through Middletons to Lord De Samaurez. 

Purdies, Nacton, C. and C.,by reference to Broke 
Hall and Lawshall. 

,, d. 1626, through Middletons, to Lord De Samaurez. 

Bucklesham and Kembroke, in Bucklesham, and 
Bixley, Rushmere, C. and C., by reference to 
Broke Hall. 

,, d. 1633, through Middletons to Lord De Samaurez. 

St. Peter's and Alnesbourn, in Nacton, C. and C., 
by reference to Broke Hall and Lawshall. 

,, d. 1639, to wid. and son, Sir Robt., 1643. Newbourn, 

C. and C. 

to Ralph, Bart., d. 1693. Greenwich, Ipswich, 

and then by reference to Broke Hall. 

1610, to Robt., 1626. Stowmarket, Stow. 

1602, d. 1646, to Marth. 1669. Brent Fen, Middle- 

ton, Ely thing, by reference to Aspal. 

Robt., 1568, to neph. Robt., &c. Tyrell's Hall, Bucklesham, 
C. and C. 

d. 1578, to Sir Robt., 1661. Braziers, Greeting St. 

Peter's, Stow, by reference to Nacton. 

,, d. 1606, to Robt. ,1714. Thorney Lizons and Thorney 

Mempliers, Stowmarket, Stow, by reference 
to Broke Hall. 

1626, to son Sir Rich., 1639. Bixley, Rushmere, 

C. andC. 

Sir Robt., d. 1600, to Martha, 1693 = Blois. Blythburgh, 
Blything, and Priory and Hinton and Westwood, 
in Blythburgh, and Westleton and Yoxford, and 
Cockfield Hall and Muriells and Stikingland in 
Yoxford, Blything. by reference to Blythburgh, and 
Creting All Saints and Darmston and Darmston 
Hall, Gosbeck ; Flede Hall in Mickfield, Stonham, 
Aspall and Broughton in Stonham Aspall, and 
Stonham Parva, all in B. and C., by reference. 

d. 1646, to sis. Martha = Blois. Brent Fen, 

Middle ton, Blything. 
Pi 



306 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

+ Broke, Sir Thos., 1438, to John, 1702. Aspall, Hartismere, and Har- 

borough Hall, Debenham, Thredling, by reference. 
Sir W. F. M., 1860, to Lord De Samaurez. Lawshall, 
Babergh, and Great and Little Livermere, Blything, and 
Shrubland in Barham, Baylham, Bramford, and 
Norman's, Trickett's, and Weylands, in Bramford, and 
Denney's and St. John of Jerusalem, in Coddenham, all 
in B. and C., by reference. 
Brokedish, Steph. de, d. about 1307, to wife Aubrey. Bredbury, 

Wilford. 

Brokesbourne, Sir John, d. 1383, to granddau. Eleanor = Raynforth. 
Alpheton, Babergh, and \Vhelnetham Magna, Thedwestry. 
Brokesley, Barth., 1407, to Thos., 7 Eliz. Gt. Bradley, Risbridge. 
Bromley, Warner, 1837, to now. Badmondisfield, \\ickhambrook, 

Risbridge. 
Brompton, Alex, de, /. Rich. I., to son (?) Edm. Hemingstone, B. 

and C. 

Brond, Emma, 1495, to Geo., 1536. Bardvvell, Blackbourn. 
Brond or Bronde. See Brand. 
Brooke, Barth., and John, 1610, to John's brother \\m. Southolt, 

Hoxne. 
a Rev. Chas., d. 1836, to Edw. now. Brockley Hall, Thingoe, 

and Telmage's, Brockley, by reference. 

John, early i8th cent., to Thos., 1772. Athelington, Hoxne. 
a Wm., d. 1881, to now. Badingham Hall, Hoxne. 

Brooks, John, 1837, to Wm., 1847. Leo's, Westley, Thingoe. 
Brotherton, Thos. de, d. 1338, to daurs. i Margt. - Manney, and 2 
Alice = Montague. Earl Stonham, B. and C., and 
Framlingham, Loes, and Walton, C. and C., by 
reference, and Bromewell and Hollesley, Wilford. See 
also Norfolk. 
Broughton, Anne, d. 1481, to son John. Talmage's, Brockley, 

Thingoe. 
John, 1464, to John. Broughton, Stonham Aspal, B. 

and C. 

+ John, 1479, to John, 1529. Denston Hall, Risbridge, and 

Athelington, Hoxne, by reference to Denston and 
Stonehall, in Denston, and Stanham, Rattlesden, 
Thedwestry, by reference. 

1517, to son, Sir John. Cowling, Risbridge, and 

Bavent's, Combs, Stow, and Clopton Hall, Rattles- 
den, Thedwestry, by reference to Stansfield. 
Robt., d. 1506,10 son John. Telemach, Acton, Babergh. 
to grandson John. Stansfield and Gates- 

buries and Prideton, in Stansfield, and 
Cockerell's, Straddishall, Risbridge, by 
reference. 
Brown, Arnold, 1680, to wid. Margaret. Benhall, St. Roberts, Plomes- 

gate. 

Geo., to Walter T., 1896. Tostock, Thedwestry. 
John, to son John, 1596. Burghard's, Spexhall, Blything. 
Thos., 1844, to Walter T., d. 1905. Brent Eleigh, Babergh, 
and Abbot's Hall, Brent Eleigh, by reference thereto, 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 307 

Browne, Hon. Cecil Aug., 1887, to father, Earl Kenmare, 1894. Hen- 
grave, Thingoe. 

Robt., 1557, d. 1578, to Robt., 1611. Leiston, Blything. 
Thos., d. 1532, to dau. Ann. Cratfield Le Roos, Blything. 
Brownrigg, Matth., 1621, to Eliz. = Beaumont, d. 1699. Tatting- 
stone, Samford. 

Robt., 1620, to Eliz. = Leake. Wattisham Hall, B. and C. 
Bruisyard, John, 1306, to Hen. 1334. Brosyard, Shadingfield, Wangford. 
Bryan, Sir Guy de, 1434, to dau. Eliz. = Lovell. Acton, Netherhall, 

in Bures, and Gt. Waldingfield, Babergh. 
Buckingham. See Stafford. 

a Bucton, Robt., d. 1408, to dau. Philippa. Oakley, Hartismere. 
Buk, Rich., 1342, to dau. Agnes. Woodhall, Rattlesden, Thedwestry. 
Bull, John, 1543, to Anth. 1570. Campsey and Campsey Priory, Loes. 
+ I 545 to Thos., 1613. Boss Hall, Sproughton, Samford. 
d. 1574, t son Anth. Langston, Burstall, Samford, and 

Glavering Hall, Hacheston, Loes. 

Matilda, 1577, to John, 1643. Earls Dallinghoo, Loes. 
(Bole) Wm., 1320, to son John, 1335. Bull's Hall, Yoxley, 

Hartismere. 
+ Bumbury, Sir Thos. C., Bart., to neph., Sir H. E. Wakelins, Fressing- 

field, Hoxne. 

a Sir Wm., 1746, to now. Mildenhall, Lackford, and Aspal's, 

Mildenhall, and Gt. Barton, Thedwestry, by 
reference to Mildenhall. 
to Sir Hen. Edw., 1836. Whitingham Hall, 

Fressingfield , Hoxne . 

+ Rev. Sir Wm., to Sir Hen. Edw. Fressingfield Hall, Hoxne. 

a Bumpstede, Robt., 1480, to son John. Willingham, Wangford. 

Burd, Wm., d. 1591, to son Wm. Denston Hall, Risbridge, and 

Beaumonds, Denston and Stonhall, in Denston, by reference. 

Bures, Sir And., 1335, to Sir Andr. 1357. Overbury, Leyham, Cosford. 

Hen., d. 1538, to daurs. Morefes, Gt. Waldingfield, Babergh. 

Robt., 1314, to 1361, Joan = Waldegrave. Gaynes Hall, 

Wickhambrook, Risbridge. 

to Sir Andrew, d. 1360. Bures in Milden, Babergh. 

Robt. de, d. 1331, to 1361. Alice = Bryan. Bures, Babergh. 

d. 1360, to Amicia = Butler, E. of O., d. 1457, and again 

1528. Acton, Babergh, and Raydon, and Mark's in 

Raydon, and Wherstead Hall in Samford, by reference. 

See also Netherhall, Bures, Babergh. 

a + Burgate, Robt., t. Hen. III., to Wm., d. 1409. Burgate, Hartismere. 
Burgh, Sir Edw. de, 2nd Baron, 1474, to Wm., 5th Baron, 1564. 

Falkenham Magna, Blackbourn. 
Sir Herbert, 1226, to Hawise = Greilly, 1283. Sotherton, 

Blything. 

Hubert, d. 1247, to son John. Westhall Hall, Blything. 
Hugh de, 1232, to grandson John, 1272. Nayland, Babergh. 
John de, 1314, to granddau. Eliz. = Plantagenet, D. of Clarence. 

Sudbury, Babergh. 
Thos., d. 1205, to Sir Thos.'s sis. about 1400 = Ingaldesthorp, 

Somerton, Babergh. 
Wm., 1558, to Wm., about 1617. Denston Hall, Risbridge. 



308 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

a Burghersh, Sir Barth., 1348, d. 1369, to dau. Eliz. - Despenser. Earl 
Stonham, B. and C., Carlton Hall, C. Colville, Mutford, 
Blaxhall, Plomesgate, Middleton, Blything, Henley 
and Brendhall and Rouse Hall in Clopton, C. and C., 
and Fenn Hall, Sutton, Wilford, by reference, and 
Swilland and Burwash, Witnesham, C. and C., by 
reference to Blaxhall. 
John de, 1361, to Eliz. = Despenser. Glemham Parva, 

Plomesgate. 
Burleigh, Wm., Lord Hill, 1616, to grandson Chas., Vise. Andover, 

Rede Hall, Thingoe, and Pickard's in Rede. 
Burler, Thos., 1609, to Thos. Swift's, Preston, Babergh. 
Burnaville, Wm., 1087, to Rich., 1. Edw. III. Ringshall, B. and C., 

and Burnaville, Levington, C. and C. 
a /. Hen. III., to Margaret = Weyland. Baylham, 

B. and C., and Darmsden, B. and C., by reference. 
Burnell, Sir Jef., 1619, to Mary = Walpole. Colston Hall, Badingham, 

Hoxne. 
Burton, Robt., 1726, to Wm., 1732, and Barton Phillipson, 1791. 

Herrings well, Lackford. 
+ Burwell, Edm., about 1550, to Mary, 1711 = Edgar. Fenn Hall, 

Sutton, Wilford. 
+ d. 1652, to Sir Jeff.'s dau. = E. of Oxford. Rougham, 

Thedwestry. 

Sir Hugh, 1359, to Joyce, 1407. Gt. Bradley, Risbridge. 
Wm., 1589, to Mary, 1711 = Edgar. Pistrie and Osmonds 
in Sutton, by reference to Fenn Hall. See too Ufford, 
Wilford. 
Bury, Feoffees of, 1572, to Guildhall Feoffees. Brett's, Hepworth, 

Blackbourn. 
Busch, Susan, 1314, to John, 1364. Busshes, Mendlesham, Hartis- 

mere. 

Butler, Ralph, 1333, to Margery = Crane. Botelers, Newton, Babergh. 
Butt, Robt., 1636. Burnavilles, Levington, C. and C. 
Butts. Acton, Babergh. 

Sir Wm., d. 1544, to Thos., 1592. Pannington Hall, Wher- 

stead, Samford. 

Buxhull, Sir Alan, 1383, to son, Sir Alan. Newton Hall, Babergh. 
Buxton, Rich., 1583, to son Robt. Gt. Glemham, Plomesgate. 
Byles, Nath., about 1855, to dau. = Cowell. Swilland, B. and C. 



Cadogan, Earl, now. Culford, Blackbourn, and East Hall in Culford, 
Ingham, West Stow, and Wordwell, Blackbourn, by 
reference. 

Caen, Walter de, /. Wm. I., to De Cheyney. Sibton, Blything. 
Cage, Edwin M., now. Minismere, Westleton, Blything. 
Caldebeck, Hen., 1442, to Badwell and Gedding. Gt. Thurlow, 

Risbridge. 
+ Caldecote, Hen., 1270, to John, 1331. Caldecot, Fritton, Lothingland, 

and Onehouse and Caldecot in Onehouse, Stow. 
Caleys, Thos., 1430, to Walter, 1507. Callis, Glemsford, Babergh. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 309 

Calthorpe, Christ., d. 1564, to Sir Jas. Sherlock's, Ilketshall, Wangford. 

a + Sir Hen. 1628, to G. W., 4th Baron. Ampton, Thedwestry. 

to Sir F. H. W. G., 5th Baron. Pakenham, 

Thedwestry, by reference to Ampton. 
a Hen. C. Holloway, 1896, and now. Wisset Le Roos, 

Blything. 

+ Sir Oliver, 1381, to Eliz., 1551. Broome Hall, Hartismere, 

and Erwarton and Thorington Hall, Wherstead, Sam- 
ford, by reference. 

Sir Philip, d. 1549, to Eliz., wid., and Hen. Parker. Thor- 
ington, Blything. 
Wm., t. Hen. III., to Wm., 1449. Calthorp, Burnham, 

Blackbourn. 

Wm., 1471, to Eliz., 1549. Wattisham Hall, Cosford. 
Sir Wm., d. 1494, to Sir Chas., i'57O. Weybread Hall, 

Hoxne. 

to Edm., about 1550. Riveshall, Hep- 

worth, Blackbourn. 

to son Philip. Lound, Lothingland. 

Calvert, W. J., 1885. Clopton Hall, C. and C. 

to Mrs., now. Preston Hall, Babergh, and Swift's in Preston, 

by reference. 
W. Sidney now. Offton Castle, B. and C., Illarius, East 

Bergholt, Samford. 

Cambridge, King's Coll. Gt. Bricett, B. and C. 
Campania, Odo de. See Almemarle. 
Cantelin, Emma de, t. Rich. I. CockerelTs Hall in Buxhall, and 

Cantilupes in Gt. Finborough, Stow. 
a Cantilupe, Wm. de, t. Hen. III. to Geo., d. 1273, to Hastings. Badmon- 

diston, Wickhambrook, Risbridge. 

Cantrell, Ralph, 1601, to son, Sir Ralph. Denney's, Coddenham, B. and C. 
Capel, Alberic de, 1316, to heir. Little Wratting, Risbridge. 

Sir Arthur, d. 1655, to Capel Lofts and Lofts. Stanton All 

Saints, Blackbourn. 
Edm., 1763, to Capel Lofts and Lofts. Troston, Blackbourn, 

by reference to Stanton All Saints. 
John, 1449, to Sir Wm., 1515. Capel, Stoke by Nayland, 

Babergh. 

a Sir Wm., E. of Essex, 1515, to Earl, 1754. Icklingham, All 

Saints, Lackford (from 1515 to 1650) by 
reference to Stonham Aspall. 
+ d. 1515, to Arthur, about 1650. Stonham 

Aspall, B. and C. 
Carbonel, Robt., 1277, to Alice, 1333 = Butler. Boteler's in Newton, 

and Carbonels, in Waldingfield, Babergh. 
Sir Robt., d. 1397, to grandson, Sir Rich., d. 1429. Walpole, 

Blything. 

to John, Studhagh, Laxfield, Hoxne. 

Wm., t. Hen. III., to Alice, 1333 = Boteler. Chilton, Babergh. 
Sir Wm., 1346, to John, 1431-2. Badingham Hall, Hoxne. 

to Sir Rich., 1429. Dallinghoo, Loes. 

Wm., about 1350, to John, about 1431-2. Creting St. Peter, 
Stow, by reference to Badingham. 



3io THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Cardinal!, Wm., 1582, to son Wm. Oldhall, East Bergholt, Samford, 
and Commander als. St. John, in East Bergholt, by 
reference thereto. 

Carewe, Sir Wm., d. 1501, to Thos., 1562. Sapiston, Blackbourn. 
Carey, Sir Hen., 1559, d - J 596> to granddau. Eliz., d. 1635 = Berkeley. 

Huntingfield, Blything. 
See Columbine Hall, Stowmarket, Stow. 

Carleton, Wm. de, d. 1305, to Geoffrey, d. 1320. Battisford, B. and C. 
Carnac, Henrietta, d. 1801, to dau., 1850 = Fenton. Brettenham, 

Cosford. 
Carthew, Thos., 1708, to wid. Eliz., 1742. North Ales, Covehithe, 

and Easton Bavent, Blything. 

a to Rev. Thos., d. 1791. Woodbridge, Loes. 

d. 1741, to son, 1743. Benacre, Blything. 

a Cartwright, John, 1792, to Robt. Norton now. Ixworth, Blackbourn, 

and see Kirton, C. and C. 
Caryll, John, d. 1563, to Furneaux, Whatfield, Cosford. 

1616, to son, 1630. Ixworth, Blackbourn. 

+ Thos., 1558, d. 1563, to Sir John, 1590. Thelnetham, Black- 
bourn and Great Livermere, Thedwestry, andCressyin 
Thelnetham, by reference. See too Norton, Blackbourn. 
Castello, Barth., 1289, to son, John, 1351. Throgton in Thorpe 

Morieux, Cosford. 
Castle, Wm., to son Wm., about 1750. Rougham, Thedwestry, and 

Launey's in Rougham, by reference. 
to granddau. Cath., 1788 = Bouverie. Hasketon Hall, 

C. and C. 
Castleton, Sir John, 2nd Bart., 1609, to Philip, 4th Bart. Hugh, 

Stuston, Hartismere. 

Catelyn, Rich., d. 1596, to son Philip. Woolverstone, Samford. 
a Thos., 1604, to Sir Nevil, 1704, and to Leman. Wingfield, 

Hoxne. 
Cause, Thos., 1478, to dau. Eliz. = Grey, 1533. Empoles, Westhall, 

Blything. 
Cavendish, Sir John, 1353, to Wm., 1569. Overhall, Cavendish, 

Babergh. 
John, about 1365, to Thos., 1592. Grimston Hall and 

Morston Hall, Trimley St. Martin, C. and C. 
to Rich., about 1500. Blowfield, Trimley St. Mary, 

C. and C. 
Sir John, 1376, d. 1381, to Wm., 1395. Fakenham Magna, 

Blackbourn. 

,, to grandson Wm. Impey. Kensings 

and Collingham Hall in Cavendish, 
Babergh. 

Rich., 1536, to Thos. Belton and Caxton Hall in Brad well, 
Lothingland and Stratton, Trimley St. Martin, C. and 
C., and Derneford Hall, Swiffling, Plomesgate, and 
Wenham Magna, Samford, by reference to Grimston 
Hall. 
Roger de, 1408, to dau. Margaret = Leveney. Stratton, 

Trimley St. Martin, C. and C. 
Thos., to Rich., /.Hen. VIII. Caldecote, Walton, C. and C. 



INDEX TO. HOLDERS OF MANORS. 311 

Caxton, Philip, d. 1432, to son Philip. Little Wratting, Risbridge. 
Cecil, Sir Edw., Baron Cecil, Vise. Wimbledon, 1618, to sis.-in-law, 
Countess of Exeter. Whepstead Hall, Thingoe, and 
Cage's in Whepstead, by reference thereto. 
Chamberleyne, Ralph, 1383, to Ralph, 1562. Naunton, Cosford, by 

reference to Gedding. 

a Sir Ralph, 1418, to Fitz Ralph, 1581. Gedding, 

Thedwestry, and Throston in Thorpe Morieux, 
Cosford, and Churchford Castel's and Rainbrow 
in Capel, Samford, by reference. 

Sir Robt., to grandson Edw., 1523. Casteles, Pole- 

stead, Babergh and Netherhall, Little Walding- 
field, Babergh. 
Sir Thos., 1275, to Ralph, about 1360, and prob. later. 

Chamberlain, Stoke by Nay land, Babergh. 
See also Rattlesden Castle, Thedwestry. 

a Champaigne, Rich., 1316, to Ralph, 1317. Campines, Cotton Hemp- 
nail, Hartismere. 

Champion, Wm., N. L., now. Hopton and Knettishall, Blackbourn. 
Chaplin, Edw., 1609, to son Edm., 1626. Lindsey, Cosford. 

Jos., 1701, to dau. = Hankey. Oldhall, East Bergholt, 

Samford. 
Chapman, Bened., and Chas., 1850-96. Occold, Hartismere. 

or Felton, d. 1498, to Felton, d. 1579. Overhall with 

Netherhall, Shotley, Samford. 
See also Wood. 
a Chappone or Chappyne, Francis, 1609, d. 1623, to Robt., 1642. Vesseys, 

Coddenham, B. and C. 

Charles, Thos., 1270, to Wm., 1339. Charles Hall, Ringshall, B. and C. 
a Sir Wm., 1265, to Thos., 1468. Kettleburgh, Loes and 

Easton, Loes by reference. 

Wm., 1292, to Sir Edw. Dodnach in Bentley, Samford. 
Charman, Rich., 1358, to sis., 1390. Charman, Risby, Thingoe. 
Charsley, to Exors. Cockfield, Babergh, and Earl's Hall in Cockfield. 
Chastelyn, Sir Gilb., d. 1294, to Joan, 1375 = Knyvet. Castelins, 

Groton, Babergh. 
Chaworth, Eliz., d. 1503, to grandson, Sir John Dunham, d. 1524. 

Aveley, Assington, Babergh. 

a Cheke, John, d. 1490, to Robt., 1544. Bludhall, Debenham, Thredling. 
Robt., d. 1548, to son John. Flude Hall, Stonham Parva, 

B. and C. 
to. great-grandson John, Giesting in Debenham, 

Thredling. 
Cheney, Wm., t. Hen. II., to dau. Marg. = Cressi. Blythburgh, 

Bly thing. 
Chenery, Edgar, 1840, to now. Southolt, Hoxne. 

Hen., 1837, to E., 1855. St. Peter's, Cretingham, Loes. 
Chestan, Wm., about 1425, to son Wm. Cleeve's, Westleton, Blything. 
a Chevallier, Temple, 1702, d. 1722, to now. Aspall, Hartismere, and 
Harborough Hall in Debenham, Thredling, by 
reference. 

See also Giesting in Debenham, and Fleming's, Beding- 
field, Hoxne. 



3 i2 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Chevere or Capra, t. Rich. I., to Wm., about 1300, and dau. Isabel = 

Sutton. Wixoe, Risbridge. 

Child, Wm., about 1500, to son Wm., 1507. Charman, Risby, Thingoe. 
Chinery, Geo., to wid. Netherhall, Pakenham, Thedwestry. 
a Chirche, Rich, del, 1380, to Mary, 1428. Swatshall Hall, Gisleham, 

Hartismere. 
Churchill, Wm., 1725, to neph. Wm. Castle, 1737. Hasketon Hall, 

C and C. 
Chyverston, Sir John de, 1351, to Sir John, 1570. Moulton, Risbridge. 

See too Waldingfield Parva, Babergh. 

a + Clare, t. Wm. I., to 4th Earl of Gloucester, d. 1314, and to Edw. IV. 
Sudbury, Babergh, and (a) Clare, and Denston Hall and 
Gazeley and Disney Hall in Gazeley, and Haverhill and 
Hersham in Haverhill, all in Risbridge, by reference to 
Sudbury. 
Rich, fitz Gilbert, t. Wm. I., to 1126, Isabel = E. of Pembroke. 

Westley Pembroke, Thingoe. 

Rich, de, t. Wm. I., to son Gilbert. Badley, B. and C. 
t. Hen. III., to 4th E. of Gloucester, d. 1314. Brellen- 

ham Hall, Cosford, and Undies Hall, Lakenheath, 
Lackford, by reference to Sudbury. 

to Audley and Stafford, 1521. Cavenham, Lackford. 

d. about 1263, to Eliz., d. 1366 - i de Burgh, 2 

Verdon. Southwold, Blything. See Gislebert. 
Clarence, Lionel, D. of, 1361, to Edw. IV. Sudbury, Babergh, and 

Hundon, Risbridge, by reference. 

Clark, John, 1544, to Edw., 1588. Leyham Hall, Cosford. 
Clarke, Rev. Sir Chas., Bart., d. 1889. Wathe, North Cove, Wangford, 

and Willingham and Worlingham, Wangford. 
a family. Lancaster, Mellis, Hartismere. 

Sir Robt., Bart., d. 1730, to Sir John, 1782, and to Barnardiston. 

Thorndon Parva, Hartismere. 
a Sir Sam., Bart., 1698, to Sir Robt., d. 1770. Freckenham, 

Lackford. 
Clavering, John, 1278, to dau. Eva - Nevil. Blythburgh, Blything. 

Rich. ,1444, to son John. Netherhall, Cavendish, Babergh. 
Claxton, Hugo, d. 1594, to Eliz., 1715 = Hall. Cratfield Le Roos, 

Blything. 

Clayton, John, d. 1798, to son John, d. 1819. Peasenhall, Blything, 
and Badingham Hall and Colston Hall in Badingham, 
Hoxne, by reference to Peasenhall. 
Robt., about 1650, to great-grandson Robt., 1704. Bull 

Hall, Bedfield, Hoxne. 
Wm., d. 1330, to granddau. Eleanor, 1350. Claydon's, 

Westleton, Blything. 
a Cleindon or Cleydon, Wm., t. Edw. II., to Eleanor, 1350 = Cordel. 

Claydon, Farnham, Plomesgate. 

Clement family, t. Edw. III., Rich. Clements, Stowmarket, Stow. 
Clench, Edm., about 1670, to Andrew and Rose, 1696. Monk Soham, 

Hoxne. 

+ Judge, d. 1607, to Edm., 1679. Gt. Bealings, C. and C. 
a + to Sir Robt., d. 1661. Holbrook, Samford, 

and Greeting All Saints, B. and C., by reference. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 3 i 3 

Clencher, 1589-1609. Harkstead, Samford. 
Clere, Sir Edw., 1560, to son, Sir Edw. Thetford, Lackford. 
Eliz., 1438, to son Robt. Blundeston, Henstead, Blything. 
John, son of Wm., 14, to John, 1529. Claydon, B. and C. 

See too Elvedon, Lackford. 
Clerebeck, Sir Hen., 1210, to Joan, 1530 = Partrick. Clerebeck, 

Acton, Babergh. 
Robt., 1296, to dau. Alice = Leyes. Rokewoodes, Acton, 

Babergh. 
Cleik, Walter, 1839, to son Walter T. C. Braham Hall in Brantham, 

Samford. 

Clerke, Waller, 1545, to Edw., 1554. Kettlebaston, Cosford. 
Clerlband, Roger de, /. Hen. III., to Thos. de Kettleburgh, 1346. 

Clubald's, Framlingham, Loes. 
Cleydon, Adam Aula de, d. 1274, to Aleanora, 1350 = Ardell. Cleydon, 

B. and C. 
Clef, Augustine del, 1316, to Edm.'s sis. = Chestan. Cleeve's, Westle- 

ton, Blything. 

Cliff, Robt. dil, 1328, to Augustine, 1411. Brampton, Blything. 
Clifton, Adam de, 1341, to Kath., 1364. Shelley Hall, Samford. 
Clopton, John, d. 1497, to Walter, 1625. Woolhouse, Long Melford, 

Babergh. 
I49 8 , to Francis, 1562. Blundeston, Henstead, 

Blything. 
I539> to son Wm., 1545. Shardelowes, Cowling, 

Risbridge. 
a Kath., 1379, to Wm., d. 1562. Kentwell, Long Melford, 

Babergh, partly by reference to Lutons. 
Sir Thos., 1380, to John, 1530. Luton's, Long Melford, 

Babergh. 
Wm., 1348, to Wm., 1428. Flowton, B. and C. 

Sir Wm., 1351, d. 1376, to Wm., 1470. Toppesfield, Had- 

leigh, Cosford. 
1377, to son, Sir Wm., 1393. Gifford's Hall, 

Wickhambrook, Risbridge. 
/. Hen. I., to Alice =Bendish, and Eliz. =Barwick. 

Clopton Hall in Wickhambrook. 

1377, to Sir Wm., 1505. Hawstead, Thingoe. 

1508, to Wm., about 1700. Castelyns, Groton, 

Babergh. 

Wm., 1545, to Wm., 1618. Monk Melford, Long Melford, 

Babergh. See too Coddenham Hall, Boxford, 

Babergh, and Sandesford's, Gt. Waldingfield, 

Babergh. 

Clough, Sam., d. 1712, to Cath. = Newcome. Strickeland Hall, Little 

Ashfield, Blackbourn. 
Cluxton or Claxton, t. Eliz., to John, 1613. Gt. Livermere, Thed- 

westry. 
a Clyatt, John, 1684, to Clyatt, 1727 = Wright. Butley, Loes, and 

Gedgrave, Plomesgate. 

Cobbold, Wm., 1731, devised 1746, to Jessup. Rumburgh, Blything. 
Cobham, Sir Thos., 1468, to dau. Anne, 1474 = Burgh, 2nd Baron. 
Fakenham Magna, Blackbourn. 



3 i4 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Cockerill, Sam., 1764, to grandsons, Mackenzie and Boston. Ash- 

bocking, B. and C. 

Cockek Robt., 1600, to son Robt. Stanes in Elvedon, Lackford. 
Cocket or Cockett, John, d. 1494, to Anth. 1541 and 1560. Hopton, 

Blackbourn, and Stanton in Knettishall, 
Blackbourn, and Timworth, Thedwestry. 

Cockett, John, d. 1516, to Anth., 1560. Livermere Parva, Blackbourn. 
a family. Ampton, Thedwestry. 
Cockfield, or Cokefield. Nesta. Priory in Kersey, and Lindsey Hall, 

Cosford. 
Lemmerus, to Nesta = De Burgh. Pepers, Cockfield, 

Babergh. 
Adam, to Nesta =i De Burgh, 2 Beauchamp, 3 Leyham. 

Groton, Babergh. 
a 1210, to Robt., d. 1297. Moulton, Risbridge. 

1267, to Joan, 1297 = Beauchamp. Waldingfield 

Parva, Babergh. 
Cocksedge, Thos., d. 1811, to grandson Thos. Martin C. Elde in 

Rougham, Thedwestry. 
Codd, Thos., d. 1558, to cousin Thos. Brendhall and Wascolies, both 

in Clopton, C. and C. 

a Coddington, Rich., .1538, to wid. Eliz. Strikeland Hall in Little 
Ashfield and Tiptoff's in Bardwall, and Hunston 
and Sapiston Grange, and Thorpe by Ixworth, all 
in Blackbourn, and Downham and Monks Hall in 
Downham, Lackford. 
Codeham, Thos. de, t. Hen. I., to grandson Thos. Coddenham Hall in 

Boxford, Babergh. 

a Coel family. Ampton, Thedwestry. 

a Coell, Thos., d. 1646, to Thos., d. 1698. Depden, Risbridge. 
a Coggeshall, Sir Hen., d. 1375, to John, 1388. Well Hall in Exning, 

Lackford. 
Sir John, d. 1362, to son, Sir Hen. Crowe Hall, Stutton, 

Samford. 

+ John, 1599, to son Geo. Fornham St. Geneve, Thed- 

westry, and Netherhall in Old Newton, Stow, by 
reference. 
Wm., d. 1428, to John, 1579. Purowe in Hundon, 

Risbridge. 

Coke, Sir Edw., 1609, to Thos., E. of Leicester, 1709 and 1759. Crat- 
field, Blything, and Aldham, Cosford, and Horham Comitis, 
Horham Jernegan,and Horham Brodedstall and Thorpe 
Hall in Horham, and Laxfield and Wotton's in Stradbroke 
in Hoxne, by reference. 

d. 1634, to Edw., 1679. Thorington, Blything, and 

Thorington Hall, and Sowters in Thorington, by 
reference. See too Sir Edw. Candlehurst in Trimley 
St. Mary, C. and C. 

Sir Robt., to Thos., E. of Leicester, 1752. Huntingfield, Bly- 
thing. 

Thos., 1616, to son Thos., 1634 and 1642. Haverhill and 
Hersham and Helyon in Haverhill, Risbridge. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 315 

Coke, Wm., 1609, to Arundell's dau., 1722 = Godbold. Livermere 

Parva, Blackbourn. See too Minsmere, Westleton, Blything. 

Cokefield, Sim. de, d. 1318, to grandson, Sir Rich. Cockfield Hall, 

Yoxford, Blything. 

Thos., 1314, and Rich, de, 1428. Whatfield Hall, Cosford. 
Colcestre, Adam, d. 1398, to Adam, d. 1425. Peper, Cockfield, Babergh. 
Coleman, Edw., d. 1599, to grandson John. Badley, Gt. Waldingfield, 

Babergh. 

Wm., 1663, to Wm., 1673. Dallinghoo, Loes. 
a John, and Wm., 1618. Weybread Rectory, Hoxne. 

Colevill, Robt., t. Hen. I., to Roger, 1297. Coldham, Frostenden, 

Blything. 
a Collett, Anth., 1640, to Margaret, 1790. Westerfield, B. and C. 

Cath., about 1830, to son Rev. Anthony, d. 1838. Rendham, 

Plomesgate. 

Collins, Sam., 1855, to Mrs. Collins Okenhill Hall in Badingham, Hoxne. 
Collinson, Mich., d. 1795, to grandson Chas. R, J., 1836. Mells, 

Blything. 

Colman, Edw., 1594, to Edw., 1698. Abbot's Hall, Brent Eleigh, 
Babergh, and Fen Hall in Brent Eleigh and Milden, 
Babergh, by reference. 

John, 1626, to Wm., 1618 (?). Weybread Rectory, Hoxne. 
Sam., to son. Brent Eleigh, Babergh. 

a Colt,Thos. ,d. 1474, to John Dutton.about 1658. De Grey 'sin Cavendish, 
Babergh, and Newhall, Kensings, Peytons, and Peche's 
in Cavendish, by reference. 

Columbers, Philip, /. Hen. II., to Sir Philip, about 1300. Bedingham 

in Occolt, Hartismere and Battisford, B. andC. 
Colvile, Gilb., t. Wm. I., and from Sir Robt., 1227, to Geoff. 1312. 

Carlton Hall in Carlton Col ville, Mutford. 
a Rich., d. 1784, to Sir Chas. Hen., 1799. Hemmingstone, 

B. and C. 
Comyn, David E.,of Bademach, 1253, to Euphemia =Beche, and Mary 

=Pakenham. Fakenham Magna, Blackbourn. 
Coningsby, Rich., about 1580, to granddau. Dorothy = Cox. Hark- 

stead, Samford. 
a + Conway, Thos., ist E. of Hertford, to 4th Marq. Chillesford, Plomes- 

fate, and Russell's in Chillesford, and Gedgrave, and 
ken, and Sudbourn, Plomesgate, by reference. 

Conyers, Nich., 1375, to Ela = Cotton, 1536. North Hall and Brett's 
in Hepworth, Blackbourn, and Necton Hall in Gt. Barton, 
Thedwestry, by reference to Finningham. 
a Robt., 1239, to Ela = Cotton, 1535. Finningham Hall, 

Hartismere. 

Cook John, 1759, to grandson Robt. Freeman, 1826. Vaux in Wen- 
ham Parva, Samford. 
a Cooke, Thos., d. 1749, to L. B. now. Bildeston, Cosford, by reference 

to Polstead. 
Rev. Thos., 1764, to Chas. Russel, 1892, and eld. Semer, 

Cosford. 

Thos. Wm., d. 1825, to wid. = Tyrell. Boweshouse, Boxford, 

Babergh. 

toE.B., i896,andeld. Polstead, Babergh. 
Wm., d. 1710, to dau. Mary -Moseley. Tostock, Thedwestry. 



316 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

a -i-Cooper, Sir Grey, Bart., 1799, to Sir F. G., 6th Bart., 1836. Worling- 

ton, Lack ford. 
Isaac, to dau. Judith = Eachard. Ilketshall, Seckford, 

Wangford. 

Rev. R. R., about 1822. Roos Hall in Beccles, Wangford. 
Wm., 1792, to dau. Eliz., 1834. Tannington, Hoxne. 
Coote, Christ., 1541, d. 1563, to grandson Nich., 1586. Culford, 

Blackbourn. 

John, about 1430, to Nich., 1586. East Hall in Culford. 
Philip, 1346, to Rich., d. 1495. Horninghearth Parva, 

Thingoe. 
Copinger, Gregory, 1710, to granddau Sarah = Moyle, 1745, 

Cockerell's Hall in Buxhall, Stow. 
a John, d. 1428, to W. A. now. Buxhall, Stow. 

Walter A. now. Cockerell's Hall and Liffey in Buxhall, Stow. 
a Copledike, John, 1428, to John, 1541. Horham, Brodockshall in 

Horham, Hoxne. 
Copley, Edw., d. 1609, to son Edw. More Hall in Cavendish, Babergh, 

and Somerton, Babergh. 

Coppedok, Robt., 1286, to Rich., 1316. Copdock, Samford. 
Coppinge, Geo., d. 1627, to grandson Wm. Saxies in Stanningfield, 

Thedwestry. 
Corbet, Guy, 1426, d: 1433, to Rich., 1555. Series in Little Cornard, 

Babergh. 

Sir Rich., d. 1524, to son Rich. Bures, Babergh. 
Roger, 1296, to Rich, or Myles, 1555. Assington, Babergh, 
and Lovenya Strattons, and Shimplingford in Assington, 
by reference. 

Corbett, Sir Rich., d. 1524, to son Rich. Dounes in Stoke by Nay- 
land and Sudbury, Babergh. 

Thos., 1789, to trustees of Thos. Geo., 1876. Thorpe Hall 

in Hasketon, C. and C., and Shelton Hall in Stradbrook, 

Hoxne, and Bast. Struttings, Debach, Wilford, by 

reference. 

Cordebeoff, John de, ,t. John, to John, 1319. Cordeboef's in Mendlesham, 

Hartismere. 

John de, d. 1250, to John, d. 1300. Buxlow, Blything. 
Cordell, Sir Robt., 1679, to Margaret, about 1706 = Firebrace. Long 

Melford, Babergh. 

Thos., 1591, d. 1612, to son Thos. Fakenham Magna, 
Blackbourn and Ringmere in Gt. Fakenham, by 
reference. 

a Sir Wm., 1545, to Edw., d. 1594. Long Melford, Babergh. 
Cordy, Jas., to John, d. 1878. Southolt, Hoxne. 
Cometh, Rich, de, t. Edw. I., to Thos. Cometh Hall in Bures, 

Babergh. 

Rich., 1398, to Rich. ,1425. Kensing's in Cavendish, Babergh. 
Cornerthe, Sir Rich., to dau. Alice =Grey. Cawston, Little Cornard, 

Babergh. 
Serlo de, t. Hen. II., to Alice = Grey, 1304. Great Cornard, 

Babergh. 
Cornwall, John, to son Thos. Welsey Hall in Little Wratting, Risbridge. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 317 

Cornwallis, Chas., Marq., d. 1805, to son Chas., 2nd Marq. Eye, 
Thelnetham, Blackbourn, and West Stow, and Word- 
well, Blackbourn. 
Edw., d. 1510, to bro. Wm. Yaxley, Hartismere, and 

Brantham Hall, Samford. 

Sir Fred, 1627, to Chas., 2nd Marq., 1816 and 1824. 

Ingham, Blackbourn, and Culford, 
Blackbourn, by reference thereto, and 
East Hall in Culford, by reference to 
Culford. 
to Kerrison and Lady Bateman. Eye, 

Hartismere. 
+ John, 1426, to Thos., 1604. Ling's Hall and Broome Hall 

in Broome, Hartismere. 
+ 1581, to Fred., 1660. Okenhill Hall in Badingham, 

Hoxne. 
d. 1615, to Eliz. = Corderoy, about 1644. Earl 

Soham, Loes. 
Rich., t. Eliz., to Mary = Rabbit, 1701. Kettlebars in 

Crettingham, Loes. 

Sir Thos., 1550, to Lord Cornwallis, 1662. Broome Hall 
and Palgrave and Facon's and Bezillers in Stuston, 
Hartismere, and on to 2nd Marq. Culford and Ingham, 
Blackbourn, and Oakley, and Beauchamp's in Oakley 
in Hartismere, and Fenhouse in Palgrave, and 
Thrandeston, and Mavison's and Ampner's in 
Thrandeston, and Stradbrooke, Hoxne, and Tim- 
worth, Thedwestry, by reference. 

Corrance, Clement, 1708, d. 1724 (? 3), to Cath. = Bouverie, 1788. 

Wykes in Bardwell, Blackbourn, and Rougham, and 

Lawney's in Rougham, Thedwestry, by reference to 

Parham. 

Fred, to Fred. S. C., now. Clubald's in Framlingham, Loes, 

by reference to Parham. 
a John, /.Chas. II., to son John. Colvile's, Rendlesham, Loes, 

and Bavent's in Rendlesham, by reference. 

+ d. 1704, to F. S. C. now. Parham, Plomesgate, and 

Hickling Hall in Parham, by reference. See too 
Rendham, Plomesgate. 

a Cotton, Alice, d. 1525, to Thos., 1602. Langham, Blackbourn. 
a + Edm., 15, to Robt., 1660. Finningham Hall, Hartismere. 
to Eliz. = Keeble, and Kath. = Wingfield. North Hall, 

Hepworth, Blackbourn. 

Sir John, 1553, to son, Sir John, 1593. Lidgate, Risbridge. 
1625, to son Allan. Earl Soham, Loes. 

1536, to Edm., 1595. Necton Hall, Gt. Barton, 

Thedwestry, by reference to Finningham Hall. 
+ John, 1642, to Fred., 1744. Harolds, Cretingham, Loes. 
+ Walter, 1445, to Sir Wm., 1846. Exning, Laxford. 
Courntenay, Eliz., d. 1762, to daus. i , = Poyntz, and Ann. Leiston, 

Bly thing. 

Courtenai, Robt. de, to son Wm. de. Badmondesfield, Wickhambrook, 
Risbridge. 



3i8 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Courthois, John, 1663, to 2 dans. Gertr. and Barb. St. Bartholomew, 

Tuddenham, C. and C. 

Cousens, J. T., 1880. Piper's, Cockfield, Babergh. 
Cove, John de, 1307, to Wm., 1428. South Cove, Covehithe, Blything. 
Cowper, Robt., 1539, d. 1558, to daus. Margt. = Harte, and Joan = 

Caringdale, Wiston, Babergh. 

Cox, Dorothy, 1623, to Peter, 1697. Harkstead, Samford. 
Crabtree, J., 1855, to Misses, 1888. Barnes, Rendham, Plomesgate. 
Craderode, Bridget, 1601, to son Matth. Overhall and Netherhall in 

Cavendish, Babergh. 
Crane, Robt., 1429, to Robt., 1435. Sackville's in Debenham, 

Thredling. 

1438, to Susan, wid. of Sir Robt., d. 1642. Flude Hall 

in Stonham Parva, B. and C., by reference to Chilton. 

d. 1447, to Hen. 1591. Gislingham and Heigham's in 

Gislingham, Hartismere, and Flede Hall in Men- 

dlesham, Hartismere. 

1560, to Sir Robt.'s 4 daus., 1652. Greeting St. Clare, 
B. and C., and Minoth in Higham, Samford, by 
reference to Chilton. 
d. 1580, to Robt., 1587. Carbonels in Gt. Waldingfield, 

Babergh. 

Sir Robt., 1609 to 1642, to dau. Mary = Hare. Wood Hall in 
Sudbury, Babergh. 

a + Wm., about 1429, to Sir Robt., 1643. Chilton, Babergh, and 

Boteler's in Newton. Babergh. 

Cranley, John, 1280, to Robert. Cranley in Eye Hartismere. 
Cranworth, Lord, now. Abbot's Culpho and Grundisburgh Hall, 

C. and C. 
Craven, Thos., t. Hen. III., to Alice, 1329 = Berry. Craven's, Henham, 

Blything. 

Crawford, Wm., d. 1835, to son Rev. W. H., d. 1868. Haughley, Stow. 
Crawley, or Crowley, Ambrose, d. 1754, to sis. Eliz. = E. of Ash- 
burnham and Combs and Columbine Hall in Stowmarket, 
Stow. 

a John, d. 1727, to dau. Eliz., 1755 = Ashburton. Badley, B. and 
C., and Barking Hall and Darmsden, B. and C., by 
reference. 

a Crek or Creke, Earth., t. John, to Sarah, d. 1292 = Roger Fitz Peter 

Fitz Osbert. Helmingham Hall, B. and C., 
and Bocking's in Helmingham, and Flixton, 
Lothingland. 

t. Hen. III., to Robt., 1258. Flixton, Wang- 

ford. 
Jas., 1257, to Joan, wid. of son John. Yoxford, 

Blything. 
John, to Wm., 1288. Burgh Hall, Burgh, C. 

and C. 
Sir Robt., 1206, to John, about 1256. Combs, 

Stow. 
Creppinge, Wm. de, 1275, to Walter. Creping Hall, Stutton, Samford. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 319 

a Cressener, John de, 1315, to John, 1540. Cressener's in Hawkedon, 

Risbridge. 

R., 1327, to Wm., 1454, Netherhall in Otley, C. and C. 
Robt., d. 1415, to John, d. 1556. Mortimer's in Preston, 

Babergh. 
a Walter, Robt., and Alex., 1428, to 1589. Picard in Rede, 

Thingoe. 
Cressi, Hugh de, about 1180, to Hen. or Hugh, 1263. Blythburgh and 

Ray don, Blything. 

Cressy, Hugh de, 1251, to Stephen, 1262. Cressy, Thelnetham, Black- 
bourn. 

Roger de, to Hugh, d. 1263. Rughagh in Cookley, Blything. 
Creting, Sir Adam, d. 1295, to Sir Edm., 1356. Felton in Barrow, 

Thingoe. 

Criketot, Ralph, t. Hen. II., to Simon's wid. Blythford, Blything. 
Wm., t. Hen. II., to Wm., d. 1354. Owsden, Risbridge. 
a Sir Wm., d. 1299, to Wm., I. Edw. III. Ixworth and 

Langham, Blackbourn. 
to Joan, 1371 = Pakenham. Ashfield 

Magna, Blackbourn. 
Crikett, Wm., d. 1298, to Wm., 1354. Levenheys in Stoke by Nayland, 

Babergh. 
Crispe, Edw., d. 1709, to son Edw., d. 1746. King's Hall in Rougham, 

Thedwestry. 
Croftes, John, t. Edw. I., to Edw., 1558. Jenney's in West Stow, 

Blackbourn. 

+ Sir John, 1551, to Chas., 1785. Little Saxham, Thingoe, 

partly by reference to West Stow, and Toppesfield, 
Geddyng and Large's in Little Saxham, by 
reference. 
1548, d. 1557, to Sir Hen. Calthorp. Barnham, 

Blackbourn. 
to grandson Thos. Loose Hall in 

Hitcham, Cosford. 

to Margaret, 1563. Wangford, 

Lackford, and Hakbeck, and 
Crepping and Flemmings in Wang- 
ford, Lackford, by reference, 
a -f to Sir John, 1664. West Stow, Blackbourn. 

to Bridget, 1672 = Read. Wykes in Bardwell, 

Blackbourn. 

to Thos., 1595. Livermere Parva, Blackbourn. 

Thos., 1423, d. 1453, to granddau. Eliz. 1478 = Cause. 

Empoles in Westhall, Blything. 
,. 1474 to dau. Margaret =Brightyeve. Sotherton, 

Blything. 

d. 1595, to Bridget, 1672 = Read. Thorpe by Ixworth, 

Blackbourn, by reference to Wykes in Bardwell. 
d. 1612, to grandson, Sir Hen. Barnham, Black- 

bourn, and Baggotts in Barnham. 
See too Ellis and Stratton in Ilketshall, Wangford. 
Cromwell, Sir Rich., d. 1546, to son, Sir Oliver, 1600. Freckenham, 
Lackford. 



320 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

a +Cropley, Wm., 1609, to Wm. ( 1659. Rockylls in Shelland, Stow. 

Wm., 1662. Shelland, Stow. 
Grossman, Rev. Hen., 1767, to dau. Eliz. = Green, 1798. Swift's in 

Preston , Babergh . 
Crowley. See Crawley. 
Crulle, John, 1361, to dau. Joan = Conyers. North Hall in Hepworth, 

Blackbourn. 
Cuddon, Jas., 1839, d. 1851, to Jas. and F. T., 1853. Cockfield, 

Babergh, and Earl's Hall in Cockfield, by reference. 
Jas., 1847, to Jas. and Thos., 1855. Elmset, Cosford. 
a Robt., 1432, to Ebenezer, about 1730. Francis in Shading- 
field, Wang ford. 
Cudworth, John, 1668. Bentley, Samford. 

1690, to Lord Masham, 1763. Southolt, Hoxne. 

a + Cullum, Sir Thos., 1656, to now. Hawstead, Thingoe, and Bokenham 

in Hawstead, by reference. 
John, 1650, to Rev. Thos. G., 8th Bart. The Grange of 

Hencote, Bury, by reference to Hawstead. 
Rev. Sir Thos. G., 8th Bart., 1855, to E. E. M. G. now. 

Little Blakenham, B. and C. 
Culpeper, Sir Thos., 1405, to son Thos. Cornerston Hall in Bures, 

Babergh. 

a Curson, G. A. Wm.,- d. 1805, to present Earl Howe. Rokewodes in 
Acton, Babergh, and De Grey's, Newhall, Kensings, 
Peyton's and Peche's in Cavendish, Babergh, by reference. 
a Sir John, 1388, to John, 1538. Felton in Barrow, Thingoe. 
Philip, to Wm., d. 1485. Brightwell, C. and C. 
Wm., d. 1476, to dau. = Tey. Stutton Hall, Samford. 
Curtis, Edw., 1597, to dau., 1607. Peacock's Hall in Little Cornard, 

Babergh. 
a Cutler, Nich., 1557, to Chas., 1581. Occold and Beddingham in 

Occold, Hartismere. 

Thos, 1640, to Alice, d. 1693. Swefling Campsey in Swefling, 
Plomesgate. 

D. 

a Dacre, Sir Thos., 1434, to Greg., loth lord, 1593. Benacre, Blything, 

and Thorington, Blything, partly by reference 
to Benacre, and Great Bradley, Risbridge. 

to Lord Norris, 1577. North Ales in Covehithe, 

Blything, and Polfrey in Covehithe, by reference, 

and Burgh Hall in Burgh in C. and C., mainly 

by reference to Benacre. 

to great-granddau. Margaret = Williams. Henstead, 

Blything. 
Lord, d. 1486, to Greg., loth lord, 1570. Wrentham, Blything, 

by reference to Benacre. 

Dagworth, John, 1234, to Sir John, 1356. Brandeston, Hartismere. 
a + Walter, t. John, to Sir Nicholas, 1401. Dagworth, Stow. 

Dakeny, Roger, about 1240, to John, about 1280. Spencer's in East 

Bergholt, Samford. 

a Dale, Bald, de la, 1271 (? Manor), to Jane, d. 1542 = Wollascot. Dale 
Hall, Whitton with Thurlston, B. and C. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 321 

a Balling, Sir W., Bart., 1810. Ilketshall Bardolph's, Wangford. 
Sir W. W., 1847. Bungay, Wangford. 

Dameron, John, about 1600, to son Thos., 1602. Bixley in Rushmere, 
C. and C. 

Wm., 1552, d. 1558, to Edm., 1630. Henley, B. and C. 

to Joan = Collett, 1596. Westerfield, B. and C. 

Dandy, Thos., d. 1607, to son Edm. Wattisham, Cosford. 

,, to grandson Thos., 1667. Combs, Stow. 

Daniel, Rev. Edw., 1855, to Rev. Rich., about 1860. Toppesfield in 
Hadleigh, Cosford. 

a Thos., d. 1566, to John, 1658. Clerbeck and Rookwood in 
Acton, Babergh. 

Daniell, Edm., about 1550, to John, 1592. Grey's in Gt. Cornard, 
Babergh. 

Danmartin, Mansey, t. Hen. I., to Galyena, 1226. Mendlesham, Hartis- 

mere. See Little Haugh in Norton, Blackbourn. 
Darby, John, 1820, to W. W., 1896. Shottisham Hall, Wilford. 
W. W. now. Talvies in Shottisham, Wilford. 

Darcy, Roger, d. 1507, to son Thos. Causer's in Stoke by Nayland, 

Babergh, and Shardelowe's in Cavenham, 
Lackford. 
to John, 2nd Lord Darcy. Chadacre, Shimpling, 

Babergh. 
Sir Thos., 1459, to Thos., 3rd Lord and Earl Rivers, d. 1639. 

Norton, Blackbourn. 

1483, d. 1486, to Sir Roger, 1504. Bardwell, 

Blackbourn, and Saxham Parva Hall, Thingoe, 
and Large's in Little Saxham, Thingoe, by 
reference. 

1536, to grandson Thos., Lord Darcy, 1590. Elms- 

well, Blackbourn. 

Earl Rivers, 1628, to dau. Penelope = Gage. Hen- 

grave, Thingoe, and Risby and Charman and 
Coldhall in Risby, and Westley, Thingoe, by 
reference to Hengrave. 
See too Fornham St. Genevieve and St. Martin, 

Thedwestry. 

Dashwood, Capt. G. A. C., d. 1863, to C. E., now. Little Belstead 
and Wherstead Hall, Samford, and Pannington Hall, 
Bourn, and Thorough Hall in Wherstead, by reference. 
1721. See Peyton. 

Davers, Sir Robt., 1688, to son, Sir Robt., Bart. Rougham Hall, 

Thedwestry. 

a. d. 1722, 3rd Bart., to Chas., 5th Bart., d. 1806. 

Rushbrook, Thedwestry, and Nowton, Thin- 
goe, by reference to Rushbrook. 

to trustees of Rev. Robt. Bradfield St. Clare, 

and St. George, Thedwestry, partly by refer- 
ence to Rushbrook. 
R I 



322 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

a + Davillers, Barth., t. Hen. III., to Barth., 1330. Erwarton, Samford, 

and Broom Hall, Hartismere, and Bradwell Hall, 
Lothingland, and Thorington Hall in Wherstead, 
Samford, by reference. 
Barth., t. Edw. I., to Isabella, 1330 = Bacon. Davillers 

in Pettistree, \Yilford, by reference to Erwarton. 
Davy, Eleazer, 1751, to neph., David E., 1827. Middleton, Blything, 

and Chickering in Middleton, by reference. 
Davy de Ashfield. See Ashfield. 
Dawson, Rev. G. A., about 1830, to C. P., 1867. Castelin's in Groton, 

Babergh. 
John, 1885, to Squire, 1896. Higham Hall in Higham, 

Samford. 
Thos., 1794, to Chas.'s sis. 1853 = Shepherd. Edwardstone, 

Babergh. 

Dawtrey, Thos., 1707, to dau. Sarah = Luther. Little Bricett, B. and C. 
Day, Rev. Jere., 1822, to Rich. J. now. Blythford, Blything. See too 

Wenhaston, Blything. 
a + Deane, Sir Anth., 1696, to now. Monk Soham and Blomvile in same, 

Hoxne. 
Wm., d. 1585, to Sir Drue, 1615. Onehouse, Stow, and Calde- 

cot in Onehouse, by reference thereto. 
d. 181.8, to now. Stratford St. Mary, Samford, and 

Spanbies in Stafford, by reference thereto. 
See too Alton Hall in Stutton, Samford. 
Debenham, Gilb., 1391, to Eliz., 1503 = Brewse. Bridge Place in 

Coddenham, B. and C. 

1477, to son Gilb., 1493. Tattingstone, Samford. 

1481, to son Sir Gilb. Gosbeck, B. and C., and 

Boyses in Flixton, Wangford. 
a + Sir Gilb., 1432, to Sir Gilb., 1489. Vaux in Little Wenham, 

Samford, and Little Wenham, by reference. 
a De Caux, YVm. now. Whittingham Hall, Fressingfield, Hoxne. 
a De Dreux, E. of Richmond, 1334, to 1341. Gorleston and Lowestoft, 

Lothingland, and Lothingland by reference. 
Deligne, Sir Dan., 1658, to Dan., 1700. \\ eybread Hall, Hoxne. 
Dendy, Thos., 1602, to Edm., 1607. Wattisham, Cosford. 
a Deneys, Roger, about 1350, to gt.-gt.-granddau. Anne = Playters. 

Denney's in Coddenham, B. and C. 

about 1414, to granddau. Anne = Playters. Tanning- 

ton, Hoxne. 

Denham, John de, 1333, to John, 1428. Denham, Hoxne. 
a Denney, Thos., 1541, to Honora, 1630 = Hay. Ilketshall, Wangford. 
Denny, Sir Anth., d. 1549, to son Hen., 1563. Bramfield, Mellisand 
Sibton, Blything, and Mettingham and Shipmeadow, 
Wangford. 

Sir Thos., 1541, to Hen., 1563. Wenhaston, Blything. 
Derehaugh, Edw., 1570, to Jas., 1573. Burton Haugh in Hevening- 

ham, Blything. 
Robt., 1541, to Anne = Cardinal, 1656. Gedgrave, 

Plomesgate. 

Thos., 1539, to Eliz. = Burwell. Colston Hall in 

Badingham, Hoxne. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 323 

Despenser, Le, Sir Edw., 1369, to Isabel, 1426 = Beauchamp. 

Middleton, Ely thing and Blaxhall 
Hall, Plomesgate, and Swilland, 

B. and C. ; Burwash in Witnesham, 

C. and C., by reference to Blaxhall 
Hall, and Whelnetham Parva, 
Thedwestry, by reference. 

., ., d. 1375, to Rich., d. 1414. Carlton Hall 

in Carlton Colville, Mutford, 
and Brendhall in Clopton, 
C. and C., by reference. 
to son Thos., d. 1400. Fennhall 

in Sutton, Wilford. 

Hugh, 1299, to Hugh, 1326. Kersey, Cosford. 

Philip, d. 1424, to dau. Margery = Wentworth. Nettle- 

stead, B. and C. 

Despotin, Jasper, M.D., d. 1650, to dau. Cath. Nedging, Cosford. 
Dethick, Edm., 1518. Framsden, Thredling. 

D'Eureux, E. of Salisbury, t. Hen. II. to Alice de Lacy = Le Strange, 
t. Edw. II. Cowling, Risbridge. 

a + Devereux, Leicester, 6th Vise. Hereford, to Price, loth Vise. Earl 

Soham, Loes. 

+ to now, A. H. E. Wood. Chil- 

lesford, Gedgrave, and Sud- 
bourn, Plomesgate, early 
part, by reference to Earl 
Soham. 
a + Walter, E. of Essex, 1572, to son Robt., 1601. Shelland, 

Stow. 

to dau. Eliz. = Clyatt. Butley, Loes. 

to Robt., 3rd E. of Essex. 1609. 

Drinkstone Hall, Thedwestry. 

,, 5th Vise., to Leic., 6th Vise. Marlesford, Loes. 

See also Bildeston, Cosford, and Christ Church, Ipswich. 

D'Ewes, Paul, about 1625, to son, Sir Symonds. Abbot's Hall in 

Brent Eleigh, Babergh. 

d. 1630, to Sir Jermyn, 1720. Lavenham, Babergh, 

Stowlangtoft, Blackbourn, and Newhall in 
Pakenham, Thedwestry, by reference. 
to Sir Willoughby, 1650, Milden, Babergh. 

Sir Symonds, to dau. Cecilia = Darcy. Monks Melford, 
Babergh. 

a Dickens, Francis, 1747, to grandson, Franc. Cowling, Risbridge. 
See Little Bradley, Risbridge. 

+ Digby, Simon, 1497, to gt. -grandson Geo., 1575. Finborough Magna, 

Stow, and Cantelowes in Fjnborough, by reference. 
Dillingham, Brampton Gurdon, 1771, to son, Theoph. Thorn. Gurdon. 

Burgh Hall, in Burgh, C. and C. 

Discipline, Thos., 1736, to daus. Pakenham, Thedwestry. 
Dordys, John, 1556, to dau. Ann = Barwick. Grange, Livermere 
Magna, Thedwestry. 



324 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Doughty, Rev. Chas. M., d. 1850, to Hen. Montagu now. Middleton, 

Ely thing, and Chickering in Middleton, by reference. 
Geo., 1758, d. 1798, to grandson Thos. Goodwin, d. 1830. 
Martlesham Hall, C. and C., by reference to Theberton. 
1778, to now Hen. Montague. Theberton and 

Sowters in Thorington, Ely thing. 

Dove, Simon, 1677, to Rev. Fynes, d. 1770. Marlesford, Loes. 
Dowayne, John de la, to sis. = Hanken. Doures, Gt. Waldingfield, 

Babergh. 
Downes, Robt., d. 1547, to son Francis. Campsey Priory, Loes, and 

Thorney Campsey in Stowmarket, Stow. 
Dowvys, John, d. 1577, to dau. Anne = Barwick. Wangford, Lackford, 

and Grange, Gt. Livermere, Thedwestry. 
D'Oyly, Edm., d. 1534, to Sir \Vm., 1677. Toppesneld and Cosford 

Hall in Hadleigh, Cosford. 
Edw., about 1391, to Sir Edm., 4th Bart., 1763. Pond Hall 

in Hadleigh, Cosford. 

T., 1555, to Chas., 1814. Overbury in Leyham, Cosford. 
, to Peregrine, 1764. Kersey, Cosford. 
1640, to Chas., 1814. Leyham, Cosford. 
Drake, Rach. = 3rd Baron Boston, to 4th Lord Boston. Gisleham 

Hall, Mutford. 

Dresser, John, d. 1822, to neph. Day. Blythford and Thorington 
Hall, B'lything. 

See loo Wenhaston Grange, Ely thing. 
Dring, T., 1885, to Thos. Walker D., now. Veales in Fressingfield, 

Hoxne. 
Driver, John, to wid. Capel in Trimley St. Martin, C. and C. 

Thos., 1745, to dau. Mary = Moore. Earl Stonham, B. and C. 
Drury, from Conq., to John, 1556. Weston Market, Blackbourn. 
from 1550, to Seckford Drury, d. 1634. Rougham, Thed- 
westry. 

Sir Drue, d. 1632, to grandson Sir Robt., 3rd Bart., d. 1712. 
Knettishall, Blackbourn, and Stanton and Salthouse 
in Knettishall, by reference. 
Hen., 1438, to dau. Jane - Hervey. Ickworth, Thingoe, and 

Sapiston and Wordwell, Blackbourn. 
I 577, to son Hen. \Yelnetham, Thedwestry, and 

Sicklemere in Welnetham. 

John, 1545, to Seckford, d. 1634. Rougham Hall, Thedwestry. 

d. 1556, to 3 daus. of Robt., about 1650. Sudburycs in 

Rougham, Thedwestry, by reference to Rougham 

Hall. 

Nicholas, 1428, to Sir Robt., 1594. Hores in Somerton, 

Babergh. 
Robt., 1505, to Sir Robt., d. 1615, to 3 sis. Chedbury Hall 

and Risbridge and Hawstead, Thingoe. 
1610, to wid. Eliz., and heirs at Hawstead. Hardwick, 

Fornham All Saints, Thingoe. 

1521, to Drugo, 1564. Rockyll's in Shelland, Stow. 

d. 1534, to Sir Robt., 1617. Brockley Hall, Thingoe, 

and Talmage's in Brockley, by reference thereto. 
to son, Sir Win. Talemach in Acton, Babergh. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 325 

Drury, Robt., d. about 1575, to Sir Drue, Bart., 1632. Hopton, 

Blackbourn. 
Sir Robt., 1615, through sis. Diana. Whepstead Hall, 

Thingoe, by reference. 

Sir Roger, d. 1418, to John, d. 1556. Chavent's in Rougham, 

Thedwestry, by reference to Weston Market. 

,, to John, d. 1498. Sudburyes in Rougham, 

Thedwestry, by reference to Weston 
Market. 

to Thos., 1566. Weston Market, Black- 

bourn. 
Roger, d. 1426, to Thos., 1566. Hopton and Weston Market, 

Blackbourn. 
1463, to Sir Robt., d. 1615. Bokenham in Hawstead, 

Thingoe, by reference thereto. 

d. 1499, to Sir Robt., 1615. Rede Hall, Thingoe. 

,, t. Hen. VII., to Sir Wm., 1580. Onehouse, Stow. 

Thos., 1487, to John, 1498. Thurston, Thedwestry. 
,, Sir Wm., 1422, to John, 1499. Cowling, Risbridge. 
d. about 1450, to Seckford, 1634. Lawney's in 

Rougham, Thedwestry, by reference to main 
manor. 

1538, d. 1589, to son, Sir Robt., d. 1615. Picard in 

Rede, Thingoe, and Whepstead Hall, Thingoe, 
and Cage's in Whepstead, by reference thereto. 
1553, to now. Grange of Hencote, Bury, by refe- 

rence to Hawstead. 
d. 1557, to Sir Wm. Caldecot in Onehouse, Stow, 

by reference to Onehouse. 
about 1570, to Sir Robt., d. 1615. Bredfield, 

Wilford. 

See too Netherhall in Rougham, and Netherhall in Thurs- 
ton, Thedwestry, and also Lawshall, Babergh. 

a+ Duke, Ambrose, 1610, to Edw., 3rd Bart., 1732. Benhall, Plomesgate. 
Edw., 1690, to Talmach, 1713. St. Margaret in Crettingham, 

Loes. 
Geo., /. Hen. VIII., to son Edw. St. Andrew in Ilketshall, 

\Vangford. 

Sir John, 1700, to son, Sir Edw. Redisham Hall, Wangford. 
Robt., t. Hen. VI., to Edw., 3rd Bart., d. 1732. Hales in 

Brampton, Bry thing. 

t. Edw. VI., to John, d. 1649. Worlingham, Wangford. 
Thos., 1476, to 1598. Ellis Stratton in Ilketshall, Wangford, 

by reference to Benhall. 
+ Walter, 1378, to Sir Edw., 2nd Bart. Brosyard in Shadingfield, 

Wangford, partly by reference to Benhall. 
Dunham, Sir John, d. 1524, to son, Sir John. Aveley in Assington, 

Babergh. 
a Dunston, Edw., 1657, to dau. Eliz. = Drury. Bull Hall in Bedneld, 

Hoxne. 

Dysart. See Tallemache. 
Dyster, John and Thos., 1487. Higham Hall in Higham, Samford. 



326 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 



Eade, Robt., 1653, t Robt., 1704. Herringswell, Lackford. 
Echingham, Lady Mary, about 1450, to Sir Edm., 1645. Itchingham 

in Kessingland, Mutford. 
Rich., d. 1461, to wid. Eliz. Blaunchards in Hevening- 

ham, Blything. 
+ Sir Thos., 1426, to daus. of Sir Ed., d. 1534 = Hopton and 

Blennerhasset. Barsham, Wangford. 
Eden, Hen., to daus. Barningham, Blackbourn, and Netherhall in 

Barningham, by reference. 
Edgar, Devereux, d. 1739, to Mileson, 1750. Clopton Hall in Wick- 

hambrook, Risbridge. 
Miles, d. 1676, to Susan, d. 1730 = Yaxlee. Capel in Trimley 

St. Martin, C. and C. 
to granddau., 1705 = Britiffe. Cranley in Eye, 

Hartismere. 
to granddau. Mary = Gibson. Busshes in 

Mendlesham, Hartismere. 

Mileson, 1756, to Exors. 1773. Peasenhall, Blything. 
1770, to 2nd son John, 1837. Occold, Hartismere, by 

reference to Burwash. 
a + d. 1830, to now. Westerfield, B. and C. 

Thos., 1650, d. 1692, to Mileson, 1770. Burwash in 

Witnesham, C. and C. 

to now. Curdon's in Witnesham, C. and 

C., partly by reference to Burwash 
and partly to Westerfield. 

1657, to Mileson, 1792. Derneford in 

Swefling, Plomesgate, by reference 
to Burwash. 

Edgar, Wm., 1545, to Thos., 1606. Gt. Glemham, Plomesgate. 
Edge, Rev. Wm., 1822, to Exors. of Rev. C. F., 1885. Nedging, 

Cosford. 
Edmund, Matth., t. John, to gt-gt. -grandson Roger, /. Edw. II. Dar- 

sham, Blything. 
Edwards, Burwell, 1791. Fenn Hall, in Sutton, Wilford. 

John Proyers Herb., d. 1758, to granddau. Eliz. 1775 = 

Rushbrooke. 
Egleton, Sir Chas., 1743, to son Chas., assumed name of Kent. Forn- 

ham St. Gene vie ve, Thedwestry. 

1766, to Sir Wm. Chas., 1854. Lackford, Thingoe. 

Eld, Rev. F. J., now. Polstead, Babergh, and Semer, Cosford. 
a Eldred, John, 1597, to John, 1740. Saxham Magna, Thingoe. 

1654, to Anne, 1738. Great Cornard, Babergh. 

Ellis, Wm., 1695, to Frances = Gage, 1739. Woodhall in Stoke Ash, 

Hartismere. 

Ellison, John, 1717, to - , 1744. Bradwell Hall, Lothingland. 
Elmham, Sir Wm., 1388, to Eliz., 1419. Westhorpe Hall, Hartismere. 
a Elwes, Sir Gervase, d. 1706, to now. Stoke by Clare, Risbridge, and 
Erbury in Stoke by Clare, and Clare and Wixoe, Risbridge, 
by reference. 

Elwin, Eliz., d. 1732, to 3 aunts. Wissett Le Roos, Blything. 
Ely, Bp. of, Glemsford and Hartest, Babergh. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 327 

Empole, Wm., to Thos., about 1400. Empole's in Westhall, Blything. 
Engayne, Vitalis, 1225, to Hen. 1253. Hoo Hall, in Hoo, Loes. 
a Essington, Thos., 1662, to son John. Brightwell, Foxhall, Kesgrave, 
and Waldringfield, C. and C., and Rivershall in Waldring- 
field, by reference. 
Esturmy, Sir Wm., 1225, to Wm., 1363. Buxhall, Stow, and Iken, 

Plomesgate, by reference. 
Eton College, Prov. and Pel. of. Gt. Blakenham and Greeting St. Mary, 

B. and C. 
Eustace, Earl of Blois. Cockerells Hall in Buxhall, Stow. 

Thos. Fitz., 1361, to Christine, 1384. Ousden, Risbridge. 
Evans, Thos. B., d. 1796, to son Thos. Undley Hall in Lakingheath, 

Lackford. 

a Everard, John, t. Eliz., to aunt, 1676 = Paston. Linstead, Blything. 
Ralph, d. 1547, to son Hen. Bavent's in Chediston, 

Blything. 
Rich., 1551, to son Ambrose, 1676. Thurstanton in 

Hawkedon, Risbridge. 
Ewen. See Gedding, Thedwestry. 

Exeter, Eliz., Countess of, d. 1654, to grandson Thos., Lord Grey. 
Whepstead Hall, Thingoe, and Cage's in Whepstead, by 
reference thereto. 



Falsham, Sir Nich., 1286, to son Philip. Falesham Hall in Peasenhall, 

Blything. 
Farcere or Fartere, Rowland, to Rowland, 1330. Hemingstone, 

B. and C. 

a + Farmer, Sam., and W. F. S., 1847, to now. Denham, Risbridge, 
Desning Hall and other manors in Gazeley, Risbridge, 
by reference. 

a Farr, Thos., 1809, to Rev. Thos., 1855. Weston, Wangford. 
Fastolf. Alex., 1350, to Geo., 1506. Bradwell, Lothingland. 

Hugh, 1378, to Geo., 1510. Kirkley, Mutford. 
to Thos., 1477. Fastolfs in Oulton, Lothing- 

land. 
Sir Hugh, 1417, to Geo., 1510. Langston in Burstall, Samford, 

partly by reference to Kirkley. 

Sir John, 1375, to son, Sir Hugh. Bucklesham, C. and C. 
" 1390, to Sir John, 1460. Caldecot in Fritton, 

Lothingland. 

d. 1406, to John, 1419. Holbrook, Samford. 
a + to Geo., 1514. Brakes Hall in Nacton, 

C. and C., and Sholond in Nacton, and 
Greenwich in Ipswich, and Tyrell's Hall in 
Bucklesham, and Foxhall and Meer Hall 
in Playford, C. and C., by reference to 
Brakes Hall. 

John, d. 1405, to John, about 1580. Old Hall, Bentley, 
Samford, and Bentley Fastolfs, Samford, by reference ; 
also Colvile's, Rendlesham, Loes, by reference to Brakes 
Hall. 



328 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Fastolf, John, 1546, to son Thos. Cowling, Risbridge. 

Nich., 1344, to John, 1548. Okenhill Hall in Badingham, 

Hoxne. 
+ Thos., 1490, to Thos., 1655. Pettaugh Hall, Thredling. 

See also Akethorp in Lowestoft, Lothingland. 
Felaw, Rich., 1428, to dau. Agnes = Fastolf. Creating All Saints, 

B. and C. 

Felbrigg, Sir Geo., 1367, d. 1400, to Margery, 1423 = Sampson. 

Playford and Rushmere, C. and C., Wortham 
Hall, Hartismere, and Sproughton and Dange- 
vile, and Necton's in Sproughton, Samford, 
by reference. 

1406, to granddau. Margery = Sampson. Buckles- 

ham, C. and C. 
Fellows, Jas., d. 1538, to son John. Curdon's in Witnesham, C. and C., 

and Colombine Hall in Stowmarket, Stow. 
Felton, Sir Anth., to Eliz., 1709 = Hervey, ist Marq. of Bristol. 

Meer in Playford, C. and C., by reference. 
Edm., 1565, to Thos., 1593. Peacock's Hall, Little Cornard, 

Babergh. 
John, to dau. Eliz. = Playters. Worlingham, Wangford. 

d. 1498, to Eliz. = Hervey, ist Marq. of Bristol. 
Overhall with Netherhall in Shotley, Samford, 
by reference to Playford. 

Sir Thos., 1356, to dau. = Curson. Felton in Barrow, Thingoe. 
+ Thos., d. 1533, to Eliz., 1709 = Hervey, ist E. of Bristol. 

Playford, C. and C., and Lees in Playford, and 
Rushmere, C. and C., and Sproughton and Dange- 
vile and Necton's in Sproughton, Samford, by 
reference. 

Sir Thos., 1546, to Sir Hen., 2nd Bart. Bucklesham and 

Kirkton, C. and C., Brettenham and Rushmere, 

Cosford, and Wortham Hall, Hartismere, all by 

reference to Playford. 

1534, to Sir Anth., 1613. Northwood in Sproughton, 

Samford, by reference. 
Wm., t. Hen. VII., to Geo., 1587. Troketts in Boxstead, 

Babergh. 
d. 1493, to son Edm. Roughtownes in Troston, 

Blackbourn. 

a+ 1493, to Geo., 1543. Palmers in Kedington, Risbridge. 
Ferneley, Miles, d. 1661, to son Wm. Shottisham Hall, Wilford. 
Wm., 1541, to Wm., 1661. Talvies, in Shottisham, Wilford, 
and Sutton Hall and Stokeland and Woodhall in 
Sutton, Wilford, by reference. 

a + Wm., t. Eliz., to John, about 1650. Creting St. Peters, Stow. 

Ferrers, Joan, d. 1375, to son, Sir Robt. Witlesham Hall, B. and C. 
Fienes. See Thorington and Wrentham, Blything, and Dacre. 
Filyoll, Sir Rich., 1387, to granddau. Joan, 1390 = House. Ashfield 

Magna, Blackbourn. 

Fincham, Ela, d. 1540, to son Thos. Bridge Place in Coddenham, 
B. and C. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 



329 



a Firebrace, Sir Chas., d. 1727, to Bridget, d. 1782. Long Melford, 

Babergh. 
Fisher, John, Bp. of Exeter, to dau. Dorothea = Pike-Scrivener. 

Sibton, Blything. 
Sir Mich., 1530, to granddau. Agnes == St. John. Peacock's 

Hall in Little Cornard, Babergh. 

Fiske, John, 1710, to Jas. Westleton Grange, Blything. 
a Wm., 1616, to Sam., 1684. Clopton Hall in Rattlesden, 

Thedwestry. 

1648, to son John. Harding in Norton, Blackbourn. 
Fison, Cornell Hen., 1885, d. 1895, to Rev. Chas. Fred. now. Barning- 
ham, Blackbourn, and Netherhall in Barningham, by 
reference. 

J. Oliver, now. Stutton Hall, Samford. 
M. W. M., now. Burgh Castle, Lothingknd. 
Fitz-Eustace, Thos., 1222, to John, 1353. Hawstead, Thingoe. 

See too Coddenham in Boxford, Babergh. 

Fitzgerald, John, about 1790, to Purcell, 1885. Boulge, Wilford. 
Fitz-Osbert, Cath., to Robt., t. John. Herringfleet, Lothingknd. 

Sir Pet., 1239, to Rg er > J 3O2. Somerleyton, Lothing- 

land. 
Fitz-Ralph, John, 1417, to dau. Eliz. = Chamberlain. Churchford 

Hall in Capel, Samford. 
Wm., 1316, to Sir John, 1388. Boyton Hall in Capel 

St. Mary, Samford. 
Fitz-Richard, Robt., to dau. Matilda = Albini Brito. Cratfield, 

Blything. 

to Robt. fitz Walter, 2nd Baron, d. 1328. Crat- 
field, Blything. 

Sim., 1253, to Rich., about 1346. Rede Hall, Thingoe. 

Fitz Roger, Robt., about 1200, to Eva, t. Edw. II. Blythburgh, 

Blything. 
Fitz Walter, Sir Robt. and Sir Walter, 1363, to Walter, 1422. Thur- 

stanton, Hawkedon, Risbridge. 

a Fleetwood, Chas., 1678, to son Smyth, 1697. Burgh Castle, Lothing- 
land. 
1639, to granddau. Eliz., d. 1732 = Elwin. Wisset 

Le Rpos, Blything. 

1652, to Eliz., 1727. North Glemham, Plomesgate. 

Geo., about 1688, to Gustavus, 1701. Bavent's in 

Chediston, Blything. 
d. 1696, to wid. Sarah. Cookley Grange and Dame 

Margery's in Halesworth, Blything. 
a Fleijs, Rev. Chas., 1782, to Chas., 1781. Swatshall Hall in Gislingham, 

Hartismere. 
a Foderingey, Gerald, 1435, d. 1459, to dau. of Thos., d. 1490. Brockley 

Hall, Thingoe. 
Folkes, Simon, 1641, to neph. Simon. Burtons in Freckenham, 

Lackford. 

a Thos., 1704, to dau. Eliz. = Hanmer. Great Barton, Thed- 
westry. 

Fones, Thos., d. 1629, to son Sam. Newstead in Polstead, Babergh. 
a Fonnereau, Chas., 1735, to Wm. Neale F., 1894. Christ Church, 
Ipswich. 

si 



330 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Forsett, Rich., to wid. Margaret = Massey. Milden, Babergh. 
Forster, Win., t. Q. Eliz., to gt.-grandson Hen. Copdock Hall, 

Samford. 
Forth, Wm., 1504, to grandson Wm. Coddenham Hall in Boxford, 

Babergh. 
Forthe, Wm., 1544, to Win., d. 1643. Butley, Loes, and Boyton, 

Wilford, by reference. 
a Fortibus, Wm., E. of Albemarle, 1189, to Aveline, 1256 = Plantagenet. 

Clopton Hall, C, and C. 
Foster, Ebenezer Bird, 1885-96. Little Bradley, Risbridge, and 

Netherhall in Little Bradley, by reference. 
John, about 1822, to John Nathaniel, about 1876. Stanstead 

in Brettenham, Cosford. 

Fowke, Francis, 1752, to neph. Edwards. West Stow, Blackbourn. 
Fowler, Thos., 1802, to now. Gunton, Lothingland. 
Framlingham, Francis, d. 1544, to Sir Chas., d. 1595. Mandeville in 

Sternfield, Plomesgate, and Ashfield and 
Debenham Priory, Thredling. 
a John, 1397, to Sir Chas., d. 1595. Crow's Hall in 

Debenham, Thredling. 

d. 1498, to Sir Chas., 1595. Scotnetts in Deben- 

ham, Thredling, by reference to Crow's Hall. 
a Francis, Sir Hugh, 1428, to dau. Isabel =Heigham. Gifford's Hall in 

Wickhambrook, Risbridge. 
a Francis, John, 1316, to dau. Eliz. = Cuddon. Frances in Shadingfield, 

Wangford. 
a Frauncys, Sir Adam, 1362, to dau. Maud = I Aubrey, 2 Buxhull, 3 

Montacute. Newton Hall, Babergh. 
Freak, Ann, 1730, to dau. Mary, 1751. Middleton, Blything, and 

Checkering in Middleton, by reference. 
Freman, Robt., 1750, to dau. Mary = Cook. Vaux in Wenham Parva, 

Samford. 

Fremoult, Joel, to son Robt. Riverhall in Hepworth, Blackbourn. 
French, W., 1714, d. 1738, to son of niece, Wm. Sheldon, 1794. 

Edwardstone, Babergh. 

Freney, Wm., 1203, to grandson, Wm. Rushmere, C. and C. 
Frere, Guy, 1293, to 1323. Benhall, Plomesgate. 

a+ John, 1660, to J. Tudor T. Finningham, Hartismere, and 
Goldingham Hall in Gislingham, and Welholme's in 
Thrandeston, Hartismere, by reference. 
Fressingfield, Walter de, 1286, to Sir John, 1321. Cookley and Rug- 

hagh in Cookley, Blything. 
+ Freston, Sir Rich., 1542, to Eliz., 1634 = Bacon. Wickham Skeith, 

Hartismere. 

Thos., 1275, to John, 1319. Alton Hall in Stutton, Samford. 
+ 1622, to Thos., d. 1647, and to daus. Derneford 

Hall in Swifting, Plomesgate. 
to Margaret, 1458 = Wolferston. Freston, 

Samford. 
Rev. Thos., 1751, to granddau. Dorothy - Fisher. Sibton, 

Blything. 

a Freville, John de, d. 1212, to John, 18 Edw. II. Netherhall, Tudden- 
ham, Lackford. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 331 

a Frost, Roger, 1550, to John, 1702. Doveton Hall in Whepstead, 

Thingoe. 
Thos., d. 1642, to granddau. Judith, d. 1719 = Meadows. 

Hunston, Blackbourn. 

,, ,, ,, to son Edm. Langham, Blackbourn. 

Frowyke, Thos. de, d. 1448, to Eliz., 1520 = Spelman. Little Cornard, 

Blything. 
to Margaret = Fisher. Peacock's Hall in Little 

Cornard, Babergh. 
Fuller, John, 1704, to dau. Hannah, 1799 = Bradley. Theberton, 

Blything, and Nettlestead, B. and C. 
Lawrence, 1598, to Thos., 1609. Holden's in Barningham, 

Blackbourn. 

Robt., 1801, to Robt., 1854. Leffey Hall in Buxhall, Stow. 
Sam., 1710, to Rich. Fritton, Lothingland. 

a Fulmerston, Sir Rich., d. 1567, to dau. Frances = Clere, 1579. Elvedon 
and Thetford, Lackford Stanes in Elvedon, by reference. 
Fulthorp, Thos., d. 1428. Creping Hall, Stutton, Samford. 
a Furneaux, Robt. de, d. 1313, to son, Sir John, d. 1349. Furneaux in 

WTiatfield, Cosford, and Eyke, Loes. 

Furnival, Thomasin, Lady, d. 1382, to granddau. Joan = Pole. Dag- 
worth, Stow. 
Fynden, Sir Wm., d. 1515, to Thos., d. 1524. Wiston, Babergh. 



Gage, Eliz., 1752, to R. Gage Rookwood, 1805. Mortimer's in 

Preston, Babergh. 

Sir John, 1644, to Sir Thos., 1836. Hengrave, Thingoe, and 
Flempton, Fornham All Saints, Hargrave (to 1826), 
and Risby and Charman and Cold Hall in Risby, 
all in Thingoe, by reference to Hengrave. 

to Sir Wm., 1717. Fornham St. Martin, Thedwestry, by refe- 
rence to Hengrave, and Lackford in Thingoe. 

John, d. 1728, to Sir Edw. gih Bart., 1867. Stanningfield, 
Thedwestry, and Fylets in Hawstead, Thingoe, by 
reference to Stanningfield. 
Penelope, d. about 1661, to R. J. Rokewood. Harleston, 

Stow, by reference to Hengrave. 

to son John. Stonham Parva, B. and C. 

to grandson Francis, 1693. Westley in Pembroke, 

Thingoe. 

See too Fresel's in Westley, Thingoe. 

Gant, Gilb. de, to grandson, Hugh de Montfort. Stanstead, Babergh. 
-i- Garden, John, 1808, to 1903. Redisham Hall, Wangford, and Rings- 
field, Wangford, by reference. 
1808, to son John. Ellis and Stratton in Ilketshall, 

Wangford. 

Gardiner, Francis, about 1700, to son Steph. Mendham Priory, Hoxne. 
John, 1559. Columbine Hall in Stowmarket, Stow. 
J. D., 1876, to A. D., 1904. Denston Hall, Risbridge. 
a + Sir Robt., d. 1619, to neph. Gard. Webbe. Elmswell, 

Blackbourn, and Woolpit, Thedwestry. 
Wm., 1275, to Thos., 1416. Gardener's in Exning, Lackford. 



332 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

Garneys, Chas., about 1700, to grandson Chas., d. 1808. Kirkley. 

Mutford, and Pakefield, Mutford, by reference 
to Gisleham Hall. 
to Richmond, d. 1762. Richel in Gisleham, 

Mutford. 
John, 1515, to John, d. 1706. Hammond's in Mickfield, 

B. and C. 
1560, to Nich., 1628. Netherhall in Eye, Hartismere, 

by reference to Kenton. 
1770, to wid. Eliz., 1800. Cleeve's in Westleton, 

Blything. 

a+ Peter, d. 1451, to Wentworth J. Garneys, 1661. Kenton, 

Loes, and Sudden Hall, in Kenton, by refe- 
rence. 
+ Rich., 1515, to Rich., 1586. Winchester and Cordeboeuf 

in Mendiesham, Hartismere. 
Robt., 1394, to Frances and Eliz., 1700. Redisham Hall, 

Wangford, partly by reference to Kenton. 
1411, to Michael, 1548. Roos Hall, in Beccles, 

Wangford. 
1530, to grandson Thos., d. 1567. Cransford, Plomes- 

gate. 

1544, to grandson Nich., d. 1628. Banyard's in Spex- 

hall, Blything, and Copdock in Whelnet- 
ham Magna, Thedwestry. 

Thos., 1567, to brp. Nich. Good's in Wilby, Hoxne. 
+ Wm., 1420, to Nich., 1595. Weston, Wangford. 

Garrod, Hen. Edwin, 1896, and now. Cleeve's in W^estleton, Blything. 
a Gascoigne, Rev. Jos., d. 1721, to dau. Theodosia = Crowley. Barking, 

B. andC. 
Gatesbury, Rich, de, 1319, to John, 1420. Gatesburies and Priditon 

in Stansfield, Risbridge. 
Gawdy, Sir Bassingb., 1567, to Sir Wm., ist Bart., 1655. Limbourne, 

in Homersfield, Wangford. 

a -f Framlingham, 1595, d. 1654-5, to Mary == Pitt, 1661. Crows 

Hall in Debenham, Thredling, and Ashfield 
and Debenham Priory and Scotnells in 
Debenham, and Abbot's Hall in Pettaugh, 
all in Thredling, by reference to Crow's Hall. 
to bro., Sir Chas., d. 1529. Woodward's in 

Pettaugh, Thredling. 
+ to Bassingbourne, 3rd Bart., d. 1724. Mande- 

ville in Sternfield, Plomesgate. 

Sir Thos., d. 1588, to Hen. Weybread Hall, Hoxne, and 
Benhall St. Robert's, Plomesgate, and Bond's in Freston, 
Tattingstone, and Woolverstone, in Samford. 

a + Gedding, Adam de, to Edm., 1317. Gedding in Little Saxham, Thingoe. 
a + to Edw., 1327. Gedding, Thedwestry. 

Jas. de, to son John, 1293. Lee Hoo in Rougham, Thed- 
westry. 

Wm., 1365, to Wm., 1499. Little Bradley, Risbridge. 
+ about 1406, to Margaret, 1495 = Lucas. West Stow, 

Blackbourn, and Gt. Thurlow, Risbridge, 
and Lackford, Thingoe. 



INDEX TO HOLDERS OF MANORS. 333 

Geddyng, Robt., d. 1493, to dau. Margaret. Studagh in Laxfield, 

Hoxne. 
Genevyle, Wm. de, 1350, to daus. Eliz. = Andrew, and Beatrice = 

Wegge. Netherhall in Cavendish, Babergh. 
Gerard, Thos., t. Rich. II., to Wm., 1408. Gerrard's in Darsham, 

Bly thing. 
a Gerardvile, Thos., about 1250, to Sir John. Woodhall in Stoke Ash, 

Hartismere. 

Gernun, Wm., t. Rich. I., to son Thos. Battisford, B. and C. 
Gerveys. See Jerveys. 

a Gibson, Jas., 1691, d. 1701, to - . Woitham Hall, Hartismere. 
Giffard, Thos., 1281, to Robt., 1353. Gifford's Hall in Stoke by 

Nayland, Babergh. 
Sir Wm., 1341, to dau. Cecily = Cokerel, 1359. Pond Hall 

in Hadleigh, Cosford, and Boxstead Hall, Babergh. 
Gifford, Rev. Rich., to Miss, 1855. Elmswell, Blackbourn. 

Sir Wm., 1287, to Sir Wm., 1349. Gyfford's in Wattisham, 

Blackbourn. 

Gilbert, Hen., 1575, to son, Sir John. Finborough Magna and Nether- 
hall in Old Newton, Stow, and Cantelowes in Finborough, 
by reference. 
Gilby, Wm., 1728, to Wm., 1788. Thurstanton in Hawkedon, 

Risbridge. 
Gilstrap, Sir Wm., 1862, to G. E. J. Manners, 1904. Fornham St. 

Genevieve and St. Martin, Thedwestry. 
a + Gipps, Geo., d. 1617, to Rich., 1721. Fornham St. Genevieve, 

Thedwestry. 
+ John, 1660, to Sir Rich., 1708. Brockley Hall, Thingoe, and 

Talmage's in Brockley, Thingoe, by reference. 
1673, to son Rich. Rede Hall, Thingoe. 

Sir Rich., d. 1681, to son Rich. Horningshearth Parva, 

Thingoe, and Badley, B. and C. 

Girling, Thos., d. 1516, to Wm., 1629. Hyllys in Stradbrooke, Hoxne. 

Gislebert, Rich., son of Eail, 1087, to Gilb. de Clare, 1262. Bures and 

Sudbury, Babergh , Floxton and Archer's in Thornton, 

B. and C. ; Undley Hall in Lakenhead, Lackford, and 

Wratting Magna and Parva, and Blunt's Hall and Wilsey 

Hall in Little Wratting, Risbridge, by reference. See 

too Blunt's in Herringswell, Lackford, and Denham in 

Risbridge, and Woodhall in Sudbury, Babergh, by 

reference. 

a Gislingham, Wm., 1255, to John, 1347. Swatshall Hall and Rushes 

in Gisleham, Hartismere. 

Glanville, Gilb., 1266, to Eleanor = Wingfield, 1335. Virles in Stern- 
field, Plomesgate. 

Ran. de, 1180, to dau. Amabel = Arderne, Harleston, Stow. 
to Maud --= Auberville. Benhall, Plomesgate. 

to 3 daurs. Bawdsey, Wilford, and Arden's 

in Finborough Magna, Stow. 
to gt.-gt.-granddau. Maud = Vescy, 1326. 

Aldringham, Bly thing. 
Rich., 1316, to Alianore = Wingfield. Sutton Hall, Wilford. 



334 THE MANORS OF SUFFOLK. 

+ Glanville, Rev. Rich., 1649, to R. Gideon G., 1737. Elmsett, Cosford, 
and Offton Castle and Offton Monks, and Somersham, 
B. and C., by reference. 
Wm., Earl, 1113, to sisters of Geoffrey, 1. Hen. III. Alderton, 

Wilford. 
a t. Rich. I., to Isabel = Bovile. Dallinghoo, Loes, and 

see Lotheringham, Loes. 

See too Leiston, Blything, and Shottisham Hall, Wilford. 
Glemesford, Thos., 1356, to Hugh, d. 1437. Peverells in Glemsford, 

Babergh. 

Glemham, Sir Christ., d. 1549, to Thos., 1640. Glemham Parva, 
Plomesgate, by reference to Fornham and Over 
Pistrie in Glemham Parva, by reference. 

Edw., d. 1571, to Edw., 1584. Virles in Sternfield, Plomes- 
gate. 
Sir Hen., 1606, to Thos., 1704. Gt. Glemham, Plomesgate, 

by reference to Fornham. 
Sir John, about 1550, to gt.-gt. -grandson, Sir Thos., 1631-2. 

Banyards in Spexhall, Blything. 

d. 1537, to son Christ. Kettleburgh, Loes, 

and Cransford, Plomesgate, and 
Wright's in Chediston, Blything. 

a + to Thos., about 1640. Fornham, 

Plomesgate, and Clay don in Forn- 
ham, and Beversham in Glemham 
Parva, Stratford, and Griston and 
Armiger's in Stratford, and Bay- 
nard's in Tunstall, all in Plomes- 
gate, by reference, 
a Glonville, Wm., about 1304, to Joan = Harling. Gunville's in Blun- 

deston, Lothingland. 

Glover family. Morehall in Campsey, Loes. 
a John, d. 1573, to Isa., wid. of Wm., 1791 = Daniel. Frosten- 

den, Blything. 

Goat